Is It That Easy?

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Xnihilo's Comment
member avatar

Hi Gang, I've been going over the High Road CDL training recently (masterful, I might add. Very thorough!), and I did a few of the California practice tests that I found online. What I notice is that the online practice tests (which are supposedly just like the actual test), seem very easy; almost too easy. Can someone confirm that the real DOT test is actually three multiple-choice answers per question? Brett's training really makes you think and reason with the question/ answers. The practice tests that I've taken elsewhere seem rather simple with the obvious answer and two 'you must be an idiot if you pick one of these' choices.

Any insight much appreciated!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Ted P.'s Comment
member avatar

.......... Taking the written test is a 2 part test, ( in Wisconsin) some states DO differ a little depending the major concern for the state, Cali has mountains type "hills" west on 80... first part is multiple choice, and the second is a sign test, don't think you can get those wrong though, and NO they aren't hard, but the written test that is multiple choice are off the DOT booklet, and it reads like "stereo instructions too"...LOL

IF you taking these "practice tests" and getting the answers right, no worries , you got this, just remember the questions are similar but not identical to the practice questions... AND once you get the Lic. the techno-garbo goes out the window, cause there are few facts in that book that people really do... sad but true... sorry

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
J.D.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I lived in CA most of my life, but don't know about how their permit test differs, nor have I compared what I remember of what I took in AZ to the "High Road", now that I've learned most of that stuff, but hope to eventually. (Did Brett mainly do that on his own?!)

If it's much like the AZ exam at all, and if your brain's good at multiple-choice logic, and you did your studying, well, mine at least was an easier pie to get through than I expected. Things get progressively more challenging as they get more "real world" as we go along this career path... That first big step was not such a biggie after all, especially since you know you get more than one shot at it if you need it...right?

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

The important part is to READ THE QUESTION THOROUGHLY.

Where they screw you up is to REVERSE what they're looking for in the answer. "Which if these is" versus "Which of these is not".

Most wrong answers aren't because you DIDN'T KNOW THE ANSWER - but because you were breezing through and DIDN'T READ THE QUESTION (correctly). And if you've studied properly, and READ THE QUESTION THOROUGHLY - usually the first answer that looks right - IS RIGHT. Typically - in multiple choice tests - 2 of the answers are PLAINLY WRONG - and two are CLOSE. If you studied - TRUST YOUR GUT.

For whatever reason - I always ripped through multiple choice (guess) testing. School, military - I was always the first one done, and by a huge amount of time. I did the (old school) Novell Certified Network Engineer testing, SO FAST - that they asked me how I cheated - because I didn't take the courses at the testing center, and did zero studying - yet I finished all 5 modules in under a 1/2 hour. Because I was working on the stuff in the field for years.

The most difficult of all the CDL tests is the HM test. There's a lot of stuff I had on my last one (FL), that doesn't show up in any of the study guides. And a lot of the stuff is unnecessary -as the shipper is responsible for making sure the load is correct and legal. Which doesn't mean you don't verify the shipping papers ANYWAYS - but it's THEIR BUTT if they load you illegally. Passed it by one question last renewal (but a pass is a pass). Since I'm not driving, I'm probably not going to renew that one next year - wasted time & $$.

The TT online study, is probably the BEST OUT THERE - and it's free (FREEEEEEEEE). I still run through it once a year - just to stay sharp.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

No they’re not hard but sometimes the can word them different just be real thorough when you study for them and remember your allowed to pass on a question and come back to it it helps at least in az you could I passed all my test on the 1st go round when you get driving!!! Make sure u get in trainers head and ask a lot of questions and make sure u get a lot of backing! Qaulcom! And time mngmt/trip planning good luck

Hi Gang, I've been going over the High Road CDL training recently (masterful, I might add. Very thorough!), and I did a few of the California practice tests that I found online. What I notice is that the online practice tests (which are supposedly just like the actual test), seem very easy; almost too easy. Can someone confirm that the real DOT test is actually three multiple-choice answers per question? Brett's training really makes you think and reason with the question/ answers. The practice tests that I've taken elsewhere seem rather simple with the obvious answer and two 'you must be an idiot if you pick one of these' choices.

Any insight much appreciated!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Xnihilo's Comment
member avatar

Hi all, thanks for your answers. Rick and Jammer, you are right about taking the time and READ EACH QUESTION SLOWLY! If anything, I found where I screwed up on practice tests were assuming the easy answer only to find out I got it wrong because of a word or phrase that was switched around. Confidence is one thing, but carelessness will cost you.

On an unrelated note, I spoke with a TMC recruiter yesterday about starting training in June after I retire from teaching here in Kalifornia. Since they don't hire in my area, I will have to claim residency at my parents' house in Florida in order to qualify. I failed to ask, but can anyone tell me if I should take the CDL in Cali, Florida, or wait and do it in S. Carolina at their training facility? I'm kinda in a strange place, because my wife will have to remain in Cali for my training and getting established on the road for a few months. Eventually, we want to move to Tennessee which is well within TMC's running area.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Joseph L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Gang, I've been going over the High Road CDL training recently (masterful, I might add. Very thorough!), and I did a few of the California practice tests that I found online. What I notice is that the online practice tests (which are supposedly just like the actual test), seem very easy; almost too easy. Can someone confirm that the real DOT test is actually three multiple-choice answers per question? Brett's training really makes you think and reason with the question/ answers. The practice tests that I've taken elsewhere seem rather simple with the obvious answer and two 'you must be an idiot if you pick one of these' choices.

Any insight much appreciated!

Having just passed my permit I can say for the most part it is that easy.

Only issue I had was my Tanker section, several of the questions where not from the Tanker section of the Highroad or my states book.

I used several online pretest that had same/similar question to those I ran into on the test to study and passed with no wrong answer.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

It don’t matter where you get your cdl I got mine in az it’s good everywhere I drive study up I passed my cdl and was able to get doubles and triples tanker haz mat in the same week

Hi all, thanks for your answers. Rick and Jammer, you are right about taking the time and READ EACH QUESTION SLOWLY! If anything, I found where I screwed up on practice tests were assuming the easy answer only to find out I got it wrong because of a word or phrase that was switched around. Confidence is one thing, but carelessness will cost you.

On an unrelated note, I spoke with a TMC recruiter yesterday about starting training in June after I retire from teaching here in Kalifornia. Since they don't hire in my area, I will have to claim residency at my parents' house in Florida in order to qualify. I failed to ask, but can anyone tell me if I should take the CDL in Cali, Florida, or wait and do it in S. Carolina at their training facility? I'm kinda in a strange place, because my wife will have to remain in Cali for my training and getting established on the road for a few months. Eventually, we want to move to Tennessee which is well within TMC's running area.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi all, thanks for your answers. Rick and Jammer, you are right about taking the time and READ EACH QUESTION SLOWLY! If anything, I found where I screwed up on practice tests were assuming the easy answer only to find out I got it wrong because of a word or phrase that was switched around. Confidence is one thing, but carelessness will cost you.

On an unrelated note, I spoke with a TMC recruiter yesterday about starting training in June after I retire from teaching here in Kalifornia. Since they don't hire in my area, I will have to claim residency at my parents' house in Florida in order to qualify. I failed to ask, but can anyone tell me if I should take the CDL in Cali, Florida, or wait and do it in S. Carolina at their training facility? I'm kinda in a strange place, because my wife will have to remain in Cali for my training and getting established on the road for a few months. Eventually, we want to move to Tennessee which is well within TMC's running area.

You are going to need to have a REGULAR DRIVERS LICENSE from wherever you "claim residency".

In many cases (depending on the company), you will trade your "regular license" for a CLP in the state the company operates their training out of - then get your CDL in THAT STATE - then go to your HOME STATE and transfer your CDL back into that state.

And this VARIES FROM COMPANY TO COMPANY - so make your decision when you get a little closer to your sign-on date (and obviously have decided on a company - or, THEY have decided on you).

Use some caution - ESPECIALLY WITH FLORIDA ADDRESSES. Most companies don't hire south of the I-4 region - and many, not south of the I-10 region.

VERY LITTLE FREIGHT comes out of SoFla - so the rates suck, and companies still have to get you home once in awhile - so they just don't hire from this area (like Fort Lauderdale - where I live).

Most of the tests have enough "generic questions", and the only state that has additional stuff is TEXAS. So even if you blow a "state specific" question - there are still enough you will get right - to pass the test.

Since you aren't planning to jump UNTIL JUNE - you have a bunch of time to figure out which way you want to go with this - and THINGS MAY CHANGE between now and June - with a new administration coming in - and how/where we are at with this PanicDemic.

Plus - with the new admins promises about DACA and other immigration policy - you may find yourself competing with 20 million NEWLY MINTED LEGAL ALIENS - who will now be able to work legally.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Banks's Comment
member avatar
On an unrelated note, I spoke with a TMC recruiter yesterday about starting training in June after I retire from teaching here in Kalifornia. Since they don't hire in my area, I will have to claim residency at my parents' house in Florida in order to qualify. I failed to ask, but can anyone tell me if I should take the CDL in Cali, Florida, or wait and do it in S. Carolina at their training facility? I'm kinda in a strange place, because my wife will have to remain in Cali for my training and getting established on the road for a few months. Eventually, we want to move to Tennessee which is well within TMC's running area.

I would get hired with a company that hires in your area if you're wife is going to remain in California for the time being. The reason TMC doesn't hire in your area is because they don't have any freight going to or coming out of that area, meaning you're not going to be able to get home to your wife during training or when you're solo. TMC will pair with a trainer that lives relatively close to you, which means your home time during training will be at your parents house.

I'd advise waiting until you're in Tennessee before going to TMC. They aren't going anywhere and you don't what the future holds. Your plans to go to Tennessee may have to be put on hold until later date for unforeseen reasons, then when will you get home to your wife?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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