HOS Scenario

Topic 29320 | Page 2

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Rubber Duck's Comment
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That’s right. I forgot he drove 4 hours to get there. So he’d have 7 hours to drive with 9:20 on his workday. Right?

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I don’t know about butch but here’s what I’d probably do. At 0340 I’d go OFF DUTY. My clock would show I burnt up 4 hours and 40 minutes. I’d have 9 hours and 20 minutes to run when I got empty at 0830.

I wouldn’t need a ten I’d just run. With the new rules your clock pauses after being off for 2 hours straight.

For example You have 10 hours left on your 14 and you go off. In 6 hours you still got 10 hours to run.

Throw some sleeper into the mix and your running like an outlaw from back in the paper log days.

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Actually - only the 14 clock pauses. He still ran 4:40 on his 11 drive clock - so even if he paused his 14 - he still only has 6:20 left on his DRIVE CLOCK. You have to COMPLETE THE SPLIT TO RESET THE DRIVE CLOCK.

This is the reason a lot of companies don't like using the split sleeper rule - even with ELD's it can get confusing. Which is why most folks only use it (under the new rules) to pause the 14 hour clock - and still take a 10 to reset both.

Rick

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

That’s right. I forgot he drove 4 hours to get there. So he’d have 7 hours to drive with 9:20 on his workday. Right?

Assuming he went 100% legal - didn't go OF DUTY until he bumped the dock - he has 6:20 to drive in 9:20 worth of remaining 14 hour clock.

So could either:

PC to the truckstop for another 5:00 and complete a 10 hour break (semi-legal - break completes @ 13:40) - OR - use the remaining 6:20 to get closer to his next stop.

I'd do the latter - you don't make $$ when you're shut down - and if you have 6 hours left to drive - might as well use them and make the $$ (and get in position for your next pickup/delivery). He didn't say his stop was a multi-stop, or if he had a pre-plan for his next load. Since he dropped at a DC, he might have a load going out of that same DC (in which case, depending on appt time - going to the TS and completing the break would be the smarter move).

What he does NEXT - depends greatly on WHAT HE'S DOING NEXT (and he left that part out). I'd be hauling my ass to the next stop, and not wasting a day sitting at a TS to finish the break.

The change in split sleeper, made it less confusing by giving you a 7/3 or 8/2 option and pausing the 14. Versus re-calculating - which made it all the more confusing for people - even some ELD's freak out a little trying to do splits UNTIL YOU FINISH THE SPLIT.

Rick

Uncle Rake's Comment
member avatar

Butch is very thankful for all of your responses. He is still trying to understand the best way to do things, and hopes within a week or so to be making decisions on his own so that he does not end up in these challenging predicaments.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

According to.the FMCSA website it is NOT a violation to use PC after getting LOADED in order to park at a reasonable distance with adequate parking. It specifically says in #3. "After loading or unloading" this was part of the 2019 change. It also does not specifically say you must be out of hours.... Just relieved from duty. Which if you are going to park, would be true. Then the argument would be that you were doing work during the BOL check out and closing doors, macros and sliding tandems.

Now what FMCSA allows and what your company allows would be 2 different things. Some people would argue the 5 hour in the dock then driving then parking for 10 hours is a waste of 5 hours. I can do 300+ miles in 5 hours..... Close to $175. We all know people who do this.

I was questioned about PC once during an inspection. A truck next to me hit another at a truck stop. It was easier for me to move and get out of the way. He saw I didn't go far, it was only a couple minutes in a truck stop. In this type of situation putting "repositioning vehicle" in the remarks can be helpful.

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Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Barry H.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Rake for bringing this topic up for discussion, much good feedback and things to ponder. 🤔🤔 I need to study the new HOS updates to expand my knowledge it appears, I'm not up to speed on the use of PC and it's requirements .. Safe Travels Sir 👍

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Rake for bringing this topic up for discussion, much good feedback and things to ponder. 🤔🤔 I need to study the new HOS updates to expand my knowledge it appears, I'm not up to speed on the use of PC and it's requirements .. Safe Travels Sir 👍

Splits are probably the most confusing part of HOS (next to RECAPS).

Fairly decent explanation of the new rule. There's a video explanation on that link too.

It doesn't have to be a 7/3 - it can be a 7.5/2.5 - as long as the total = 10 hours. It's still a little confusing - but slightly less so than the previous one - and the addition of the 7/3 makes it a little more flexible. You can do the SHORTER PERIOD as plain old "Off Duty" - the LONGER ONE MUST BE IN SLEEPER BERTH.

I would think most companies should (that allow the split) "should" have their ELD's programmed for it...

Rick

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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