Fifth Time Is The Charm

Topic 29410 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Uncle Rake's Comment
member avatar

Fifth Time Is the Charm

The first time I went through Snoqualmie pass (on I-90 in WA) was just after I started TNT training. It was snowing, and my trainer was asleep in the sleeper. I used the engine brake to control my speed. At one point I felt the truck slip a little so I quickly disengaged the brake. That was the only time I noticed a problem, and I did continue to use the engine brake. The second time I went through the pass, my trainer was sleeping, it was snowing, and I went through it again.

On our third attempt through the area, my trainer was scheduled to drive and we had been under a chain order. We were wondering whether or not to go ahead and chain up when someone came through and told us they had lifted the chain requirement. We checked the Washington DOT website, and sure enough chains were not required for Snoqualmie. So we took off across the interstate again and as soon as we got under one of those LED warning signs, it said chains were required. We wondered about the discrepancy but decided to go ahead and take our chances. We made it through the area without any problems without chains.

The fourth time we encountered Snoqualmie, my trainer woke me at 0100 on January 12, 2021. He said we were approaching the area and chains were required. He had never used chains and I certainly had not. We were pretty fast learners I would say. I think we had our six chains on in about 40 minutes. That included moving a lot of things to get to them. (I will just leave that statement as it is.) As we eased out on the highway the ride was so rough we wondered if we had done something wrong. Eventually we got up closer to our 30 mph limit and the ride was much smoother. We made it through the area without any problems. When we got to the worst area, it was not difficult to tell why chains were required. And then, when we got to the chain removal area, behold, all six chains were still on the tires!

Following the completion of our last load in the northwest, I needed less than 1500 miles to complete my TNT training. I figured they would route us toward Springfield so I could get my miles done and to be ready for an upgrade. Instead, we are picking up two loads in Washington and taking them to Connecticut, a total trip of over 3,000 miles. By the time I do manage to get back to Springfield, I may be closer to 60,000 miles. But that's okay.

When I checked the weather for Snoqualmie last night, just in case we headed that way, which according to our history would seem likely, it showed that no restrictions were required. Sure enough, that is exactly the route we took, and thankfully, the roads were indeed clear. So if you have to go through Snoqualmie, and conditions are less than favorable, keep trying and eventually it will get better. That’s not to say the entire trip was easy this morning. I experienced times when I thought I was in a snow globe. But the temperature stayed in the middle 30s at least so conditions never got really bad.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm assuming (from TNT), that you are with Prime?

I thought they had a policy - if you have to "throw iron" - go park?

I guess there are some places you can't avoid it - "Donner Party, table for two" (old Robin Williams joke - R.I.P), or be STUCK LIKE CHUCK for the entire winter.

I know it ain't FUN - we did it in school - in nice balmy south florida - just so we could see how it was done. Not sure I would want to be out in the freezing damp - and it's just as messy (or messier) getting then of and stowed.

DO NOT ENVY YOU...

Rick

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

I learned how to chain up right there to my friend

Fifth Time Is the Charm

The first time I went through Snoqualmie pass (on I-90 in WA) was just after I started TNT training. It was snowing, and my trainer was asleep in the sleeper. I used the engine brake to control my speed. At one point I felt the truck slip a little so I quickly disengaged the brake. That was the only time I noticed a problem, and I did continue to use the engine brake. The second time I went through the pass, my trainer was sleeping, it was snowing, and I went through it again.

On our third attempt through the area, my trainer was scheduled to drive and we had been under a chain order. We were wondering whether or not to go ahead and chain up when someone came through and told us they had lifted the chain requirement. We checked the Washington DOT website, and sure enough chains were not required for Snoqualmie. So we took off across the interstate again and as soon as we got under one of those LED warning signs, it said chains were required. We wondered about the discrepancy but decided to go ahead and take our chances. We made it through the area without any problems without chains.

The fourth time we encountered Snoqualmie, my trainer woke me at 0100 on January 12, 2021. He said we were approaching the area and chains were required. He had never used chains and I certainly had not. We were pretty fast learners I would say. I think we had our six chains on in about 40 minutes. That included moving a lot of things to get to them. (I will just leave that statement as it is.) As we eased out on the highway the ride was so rough we wondered if we had done something wrong. Eventually we got up closer to our 30 mph limit and the ride was much smoother. We made it through the area without any problems. When we got to the worst area, it was not difficult to tell why chains were required. And then, when we got to the chain removal area, behold, all six chains were still on the tires!

Following the completion of our last load in the northwest, I needed less than 1500 miles to complete my TNT training. I figured they would route us toward Springfield so I could get my miles done and to be ready for an upgrade. Instead, we are picking up two loads in Washington and taking them to Connecticut, a total trip of over 3,000 miles. By the time I do manage to get back to Springfield, I may be closer to 60,000 miles. But that's okay.

When I checked the weather for Snoqualmie last night, just in case we headed that way, which according to our history would seem likely, it showed that no restrictions were required. Sure enough, that is exactly the route we took, and thankfully, the roads were indeed clear. So if you have to go through Snoqualmie, and conditions are less than favorable, keep trying and eventually it will get better. That’s not to say the entire trip was easy this morning. I experienced times when I thought I was in a snow globe. But the temperature stayed in the middle 30s at least so conditions never got really bad.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

No where to park right there there’s a ta farther up the pass but you still gotta chain up to get there

I'm assuming (from TNT), that you are with Prime?

I thought they had a policy - if you have to "throw iron" - go park?

I guess there are some places you can't avoid it - "Donner Party, table for two" (old Robin Williams joke - R.I.P), or be STUCK LIKE CHUCK for the entire winter.

I know it ain't FUN - we did it in school - in nice balmy south florida - just so we could see how it was done. Not sure I would want to be out in the freezing damp - and it's just as messy (or messier) getting then of and stowed.

DO NOT ENVY YOU...

Rick

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Uncle Rake's Comment
member avatar

Rick, yes I am driving for Prime. The only thing I have heard about their policy in relation to adverse driving conditions is that if you think it is too unsafe to drive, you are free to park it and wait. If I understand correctly, the only time my trainer felt the need to do that was in a blizzard in Maine where he could not move. He has also shut down when mandated by law enforcement. Normally, he attempts to continue as long as possible, even in adverse conditions. This time the need to put on chains was suddenly mandated by conditions around us. I guess we could have parked there and waited, but we chose the other option. As it turned out, despite installation in very hard snowfall and removal in hard rain, the experience was not that difficult.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Uncle Rake is your trainer by chance a lease op? I've noticed they tend to push on more frequently than company drivers. Often times if you're able to sit out for a couple hours you'll find the roads in much better condition when you finally get moving. Thats not always the case depending on the size and severity of the storm. Even as a local driver I've pushed my start time back a few hours to give the plows time to work. Instead of driving on snow and ice doing maybe 30 mph im now able to do atleast 60 on wet roads. Less stress and safer, plus if you're paid by the mile you're earning roughly double what you would have for the hours off your 70.

The most important thing is listen to your gut feeling, and to keep dispatch informed to avoid a service failure (late). Only you know where your comfort level is. I'd rather have somebody park their truck than feel pressured into driving and cause an accident resulting in a preventable or even worse injuries and/or fatality.

Driving in inclement weather is required in this job TO A POINT. Driving in whiteout conditions or freezing rain is not. I can guarantee any reputable company will not hold it against you unless you abuse it. If you park it anytime there's flurries or just an inch of snow thats when you may receive some flack for it. Unfortunately those individuals who abuse it are the ones who post negative reviews about how they were forced to drive.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More