Im Giving Trucking Another Chance

Topic 29472 | Page 3

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Banks's Comment
member avatar

Macros and qualcomms isn't something I deal with, so I can't help you with that. I'm sure somebody that can will be along shortly.

I've begged to get 1 of this off this truck, I've told them over and over this situation isn't good and my co driver has tried too.

Idk how it works over at WE, but can you request a new DM? Scratch begging, that gets you nowhere. You have to let them know that it's a hostile work environment and that it's dangerous to the both of you and the motoring public. Tell them that you've explained this to them multiple times and they refuse to listen. Inform them that the call is being recorded or send them an email because email always has a paper trail.

If that doesn't work, I'd look into getting training elsewhere. It's something never recommend, but you're in a dangerous position to you and the public driving tired and hungry.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm also not used to having to make so many decisions myself, from the Military to the oilfields to construction I've always had somebody telling me what to do and how to get it done so I feel like I'm lacking a very valuable skill needed out here

You are indeed in a tough spot, I read somewhere recently that people that have only ever had someone telling them what to do and how to do it have a hard time in trucking. This is one job where you are pretty much on your own. The valuable skill you're missing is critical. The ability to think on your own is harder than some people think. To look at a situation someone else is in is different than looking at a situation you yourself are in as it is happening. It can be learned however and once you get it it will serve you well. This is gonna sound cheesy but here are some ways to develop critical thinking skills.

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The main thing however is to remain calm at all times while the bad stuff is happening. When we get angry, scared, frustrated, stressed out and generally worked up the decisions we start making are rarely the best decisions. Slow down and really ask yourself if it is really worth the stress and if there is another way of handling the situation, a better way. This job is indeed stressful and initially quite difficult for those that aren't used to making your own decisions but you eventually gain enough confidence in the decisions you make that you settle into the job. Stop worrying about if you're gonna be fired. Don't cuss your DM , don't get into a physical altercation with anyone, don't threaten anyone and don't have a serious wreck and your job is safe. Western Express is very forgiving, especially for new drivers.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

As long as you've done everything you've posted on here and still had mostly no help or communication from your direct supervisor, this is what I would do:

As long as you and your teammate are in total agreement on each wanting to be solo drivers, and that you have it in writing that you would start as a solo driver, I would park the truck. Inform management on the Qualcomm prior to doing this, though. Send in a brief outline of what you've posted here. Tell them the truck is not moving until they figure out how you will be on your own truck as a solo driver. Get this solution sent to you on the Qualcomm, and insist it is signed electronically by a manager or your dispatcher.

The only reason I suggest this is going by the assumption that what you've posted here is 100% legitimate.

good-luck.gif

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

I’ve been following along and not said anything because everyone has covered what my thoughts were.

I am getting the feeling from things that Zach has said and some he hasn’t that he was not prepared for this career. He is another example of someone that thought it was an easy job just driving and jumped in. Based on his photo he appears very young. He states he has never really had to think for himself.

Zach my best advice is you have seen the hard side of this career. It is a career and not just a job. If you have the drive and determination then you will find a way to make it work for you. It is going to take a tremendous amount of work, determination and you learning things and a strong committment.

You have already been told by a couple drivers within your company how to handle the situation. They can’t do it for you. You have to have a proffessional discussion with your DM and tell him factually that you didn’t sign up for this and your not doing it. It sounds like you talked to him but you were not clear in your communication so he double talked you and you let him do it. You have to stand up for yourself. I’m not sure how your DM’s get paid, but I bet he gets a small commission off every load, that is why he pushed teaming. In reality you will still make close to the same solo or team, but he will make more because the truck generates more revenue.

I wish you the best of luck. Let us know how it turns out.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Zach 's Comment
member avatar

I’ve been following along and not said anything because everyone has covered what my thoughts were.

I am getting the feeling from things that Zach has said and some he hasn’t that he was not prepared for this career. He is another example of someone that thought it was an easy job just driving and jumped in

Never assumed that, I knew this was going to be hard, I just never imagined I was going to be a chronic **** up the moment I got in to a seat

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Zach what are you basing your last comment on. How have you been a screwup since you got in the seat. Maybe I missed something but I don’t recall you hitting anything or intentionally damaging any equipment.

In the beginning we all felt inadequate about things. Its a brand new experience from start to finish. We all deal with issues everyday. Like has been said you need to mature in the industry and take things in stride. You can choose to be part of any problem, or part of the solution to the problem.

There are several ways to approach communication with others. You can make or break any communication by your approach. Many times we are out own worst enemy in this area. Espically when upset.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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