Left Prime

Topic 29917 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
John B.'s Comment
member avatar

I know there are a lot of happy prime drivers here this is only my experience. I flew home yesterday, after the disaster with my first tnt trainer I was given a second one. Was told he was their best. Maybe at one time but not anymore. Truck was filthy with rotting food and smells that I haven’t encountered since I left the family farm. When I brought this to their attention my fleet manager Steve Benz and the training manager Steve Tassin both berated me saying I wasn’t cut out to drive. That I needed to lower my expectations and health and sanitary conditions. Mr Low should be ashamed of what his company is becoming. Do not choose prime they have turned into cr England, they are now a cdl mill. Only let me post one picture I have more.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

So John, what is next?

You are starting to create a pattern here. First you asked us in another thread, "Am I a wimp?" Now you are painting a picture of Prime with a very broad brush, based on your experience with two trainers who didn't meet up to your standards. You have obviously been all over the internet seeking advice or information. That's why you compared Prime to C. R. England (a company which you obviously don't have any experience with) and then you threw in there a common super trucker phrase by calling Prime a "CDL Mill." Give us a break John! What has happened to you?

Why did you just quit without seeking some advice here? We could have given you guidance and you could still be on your way to being a truck driver. You have made a big blunder. In fact, if I were you I would get right on the phone with Stan and tell them you realize you made a hasty and foolish decision. I am pretty sure you won't do that, but that is my best advice at this time. You could have handled this situation much differently. You could have sent them some pictures of your trainer's truck and told them this just isn't working for you. Ask them to route you to a terminal so the truck could be inspected and ask them what can be done - don't demand something. The way you describe their response tells me there is something missing from this story. I don't know what it is, but it sounds like they have determined that you are too demanding for them to deal with all your issues.

We have a tendency to teach rookies why it is important that they "don't rock the boat." We certainly don't condone getting walked over, but there is a fine line there that a new driver must walk. You are not in charge yet. You are just another newbie who is likely to quit at the least little bit of a problem, and so you did. These companies trust their productive long time drivers, even if they are slobs. You don't have to live with a slob, but by quitting and blaming the whole company for one guy being a slob is way out of line. I know you don't see it that way or you wouldn't be home trying to figure out what to do next.

I am sorry it came to this. It didn't have to. You are the reason you are at home. You quit. It is not Prime's fault. It is not even your slob of a trainer's fault. You made a hasty decision. You failed to ask the very people who could have helped and guided you. In trucking, hasty decisions are usually regretted. I think you will see that soon enough.

I recommend you get on the phone and see if you can get this turned around. I trained with an absolute idiot. I honestly think I taught him more than he taught me. It could have been described as a ridiculous situation. Guess what? I became a very successful driver simply because I knew it was a short term situation. I kept the big picture in focus.I didn't need to be pampered and coddled. I wanted it bad enough to endure a brief time of being uncomfortable. If it had been unbearable I would have worked it out somehow. My motto was "Never Give Up!" I just wish you had some of that spirit in you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

John B.'s Comment
member avatar

I will tell you what old school, you are the problem. For 20 years I worked for the same company climbing poles as a line man. Cleanliness and grooming standards were a must, men died not following the rules. I have buried 6 friends that got hit when 100k volts. To throw the fact that I will not work on filth is bull****. This company is bringing in over 100 people a week and throwing the **** against the wall to see why stick. I am not some millianial cry baby wanting a free ride. I am a 50 year old man that demands minimal osha standards. So if you got a problem with me calling out a cdl mill for there bull****...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately I had to wake up in the middle of the night to do a small bit of editing to John's last post which included physical threats against me. It is unfortunate that a 50 year old man still behaves like a high school teenager, but we already knew there was more to this story than he was sharing with us.

For the record, I agreed he had a slob for a trainer. There are no OSHA standards for the cleanliness of your truck's interior. I merely suggested that there was a better way for him to handle his unfortunate situation. If he tried to handle it anything like he tried to handle me, it is no wonder he is no longer at Prime. They are extremely selective over there.

John, I am very sorry to hear about your friends who lost their lives. I too am a licensed master electrician in Texas. I know the dangers, and have been at those funerals myself.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

It appears that by Johns own description, he did not stick.

On to the next wannabe

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

You will find sympathy in the dictionary somewhere between sh*t and syphilis . Not here.

Good luck.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Wow! What is it this week with two folks losing their minds with trivial stuff when the goal line is within sight?

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More