Night Or Weekends Schools?

Topic 30210 | Page 1

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Spunkybubbles5 's Comment
member avatar

Ok, so y’all convinced me that company sponsored training is the way to go, however so far all the one’s I’ve seen would require me to go to another state to train for several weeks and be on the road for several weeks right off the bat. I’m not in a position where I can do that just yet. I would like to keep my full time job as I’m trying to obtain my CDL. All the local trucking schools only offer day time classes Mon-Fri so that wouldn’t work for me. I found one incredibly sketchy “school” in a nearby town that would do nights and weekends, but it really looked horrible from the reviews and the way the owner talked on their Facebook page. So not sure I’m that desperate yet. Anyway, are there reputable night/weekend schools? What about private trainers? Is that an option?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I understand your concerns. First off you will need a 160 hour training certificate. That lets out private training pretty much. Nights/weekends will take you along time to complete.

Going to another state to train and spend 3 weeks full time, your done. It is fast paced so be prepared.

Roehl has a great training program and as I inderstand it they pay you from day 1 these days. Several locations also.

Everyone has different wants and needs. You have to figure out what works for your situation.

Just my .02 cents

Wish you well in your decision.

John's Comment
member avatar

I understand where you are coming from. It is part of what has held me back from taking the plunge too. But, I know that in order for me to take the next step - I have to stop working my current job (which means officially closing my business), and put 100% into getting my CDL and getting on the road. Even if you found a place to go to school during the week in the evenings, or on the weekends...you will be unable to dedicate/focus solely on getting that CDL...distracted by your day job, fatigue, etc. Not saying you can't do it - just going to make it more difficult than it already is.

Wanting to keep your job -- while training, is it a security blanket for you? In the event you fail, you have something to fall back on? I understand - that is part of what delayed me, the fear of failure. If it is financial, trust me, I understand that too. I waited toooo long to take the plunge. A couple of months ago, I would have been in better shape than I am now -- but now, it has gotten to a now or never situation (I stopped promoting my business months ago, and just servicing my regulars at the moment - and I lost a large chunk of customers/big accounts at the beginning of COVID - and never regained).

I won't pretend to know your situation completely, only you know it. But your best bet, is to leave your current job, on good terms...and take the next step. Yes, it will require you to be away for some time - how long varies on what company you choose. Now, some companies do contract through local schools...so you may possibly be able to go to school locally - go home every night.

For example, I was expecting to go to Phoenix. But I visited my local Knight terminal , and they were promoting the idea of going through a local school that shares the yard. Being a vet, I was planning on taking advantage of their scholarship for vets - which would require me to go to Phoenix...whereas, staying local would require me to reimburse Knight for the expense of the school through weekly deductions. I haven't made the decision yet.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I understand your position, I would suggest trying to leave your job with an option to come back if you hate trucking. Trucking is a lifestyle, that for at least your first year will require you to be on the road for 6 to 8 weeks at a time. Company sponsored training is very fast.

With CFI, from the time one is accepted into their program, to the time they are solo can be right weeks or less. It is best to jump in with both feet.

Yes, people have done the part time schooling, it takes longer and their is a higher learning curve. Company sponsored training is like a boot camp.

Hope this helps.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Uh no, company sponsored training is not like boot camp other than the fact that you get up early each day, you are around a bunch of strangers, and are learning lots of new things.

It is nothing like any of the three boot camps I attended.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

John's Comment
member avatar

I think that is what he meant lol

I know if an instructor gets within a half inch my nose and starts yelling, we gonna have a problem lol...

Considering the last three years I was in the USAF, I was the one in the faces lol.

I can see it being like boot camp, in the way that you have to focus so much of your attention on one goal...and the information/sensory overload.

Uh no, company sponsored training is not like boot camp other than the fact that you get up early each day, you are around a bunch of strangers, and are learning lots of new things.

It is nothing like any of the three boot camps I attended.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Spunkybubbles5 's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for sharing what you’re going through as far as making decisions in your journey.

Wanting to keep your job -- while training, is it a security blanket for you?

Honestly, that’s exactly it. It all comes down to me being scared. I’m afraid I won’t be able how to learn how to drive those big trucks and will get kicked out of the program, then I’ll be stuck without a job.

For example, I was expecting to go to Phoenix. But I visited my local Knight terminal , and they were promoting the idea of going through a local school that shares the yard.

That would be neat if I could find one like that here. I’m gonna keep looking and work on gathering the courage to just go for it! Lol

Thanks

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
John's Comment
member avatar

OK, so what it comes down to is your confidence level. As you said, you are afraid that IF you fail, you won't have a job when you return. One thing you can do, is make sure you leave on good terms, to increase the chances of returning, should the need arise. Of course, there is no guarantee, but, your odds are better.

But, the current job aside. I am willing that almost everyone fears failure prior to actually taking the dive. I know I worry about it. Those that say they didn't, or don't, are either lying, or they are over-confident, and are usually humbled upon sitting in the seat. So that, is natural - it is a new path in life - and you perceive it as a risk - and in some ways it is. But most things in life come with risk, am I right? I am willing to bet that after you sit your butt in the drivers seat and successfully make a few maneuvers, that fear will diminish. Yes, you will fail, as will I, to do every maneuver correctly 100% of the time. But when you get that first successful maneuver, you will know, you CAN do it. It is a matter of repeating it - and getting it right more times than you do wrong...and you will get there. You will have plenty of practice - as I have read in the diaries.

I decided this was the path I was going to go, months ago. I have some issues that held me back, personally, which I won't dive into here now, as I have briefly mentioned them in past posts. But I decided a couple of weeks ago, that I have procrastinated long enough, and it is now it is time to do or die. Now, I am not diving in...I am just taking the steps. For example, I had a heart attack at 42, 5 years ago...no, that wasn't my first step. But it required additional steps before getting my DOT physical. The clinic that does DOT physicals, told me I would need either an echocardiogram, or a stress test, and a form from my cardiologist clearing me. I got my echocardiogram - it cost me about $1200 after insurance. I could have chosen the stress test, which would have been significantly less - but, as someone who doesn't exercise regularly, I dreaded it. Wouldn't you know it, after my echocardiogram, my cardiologist called and wanted me to do a stress test...so I got stuck doing both! Well, I did it - and it wasn't nearly as bad as what I was expecting (I am really not in bad shape - I just hate running lol). I am getting off-track talking about myself lol. Long story short, I got my echo, my stress test, and now a letter and form from my cardiologist that cleared me (I have a 97% chance at surviving the next 5 years without a major cardiac event, yay me!) So my next step is my DOT physical - which I was going to do tomorrow - but have decided to hold off just a little longer until I am ready to go get my CDL permit - as I have to wait on some paperwork to return from the Social Security office (lost my SS card, which I need, and they also have possession of other forms of ID I need to take to get my CDL and they wouldn't allow copies....grrr).

OK, now that you made it through that monstrous paragraph you ask what is my point? The point is, you don't have to dive all at one time. If you haven't already, start studying for your CDL Permit. While doing that, go get your DOT Physical. Then get your permit, when you feel you are ready to test. Once you have possession of the DOT Card and Permit, the next step is to commit. I already have contacts with Knight, and I will likely apply elsewhere once I get close to my permit...just to solidify my choices - so I can make that commitment.

You can start applying now, you can wait until you get things in order...but you have to commit to it. You can do it.

High Road CDL Training Program

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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