At-fault Accident In Personal Vehicle Grounds For Disqualification?

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Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

At orientation for Prime today I took the honest route and put on my paper application that I recently (in the past year) had an at-fault accident in my personal vehicle. This is the only accident I've ever had in 12 years of having a license, but it happened when I had my class A. I feel like I might have just screwed myself and I'm really bummed... but I just figured I should be honest- based off things I've heard of recruits being sent home for not being honest about their driving record. Does anybody know what Prime's specific policy regarding similar situations is? Am I going to be sent home?Apologies if the info is already on the site somewhere, but I have yet to find it after much searching.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

If you are just now putting it on your paper application in orientation and didn't put it on your online application, you will probably be sent home, because you lied on your online application.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Am I going to be sent home?

Garrett, it sounds like they already invited you to orientation and you are there now. Is this the first time you are revealing this information? If so, why hadn't you told them before? If you get sent home it won't be because you were honest. It is quite the opposite. You should have revealed this on your application.

Can you give us some clarity on why this is now bothering you? They should have already been aware of this. If it was something they had a policy against they would not have invited you for orientation. They do not like it when you come up with additional information after you get there.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

At orientation for Prime today I took the honest route and put on my paper application that I recently (in the past year) had an at-fault accident in my personal vehicle. This is the only accident I've ever had in 12 years of having a license, but it happened when I had my class A. I feel like I might have just screwed myself and I'm really bummed... but I just figured I should be honest- based off things I've heard of recruits being sent home for not being honest about their driving record. Does anybody know what Prime's specific policy regarding similar situations is? Am I going to be sent home?Apologies if the info is already on the site somewhere, but I have yet to find it after much searching.

Dang, Garrett~~!!!!

SOOOO MANY people have reached out to you, with you, and for you. I seriously doubt Prime would have invited you in, had they known this prior. I just hope this doesn't show as a 'termination' now, on your record.

Anyone in the know, guys?

Sheesh..auugh.. Should've stuck with Western; they 'might' have put you through.

Best wishes, AGAIN!

~ Anne ~

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

I just got sent home. It was inevitable, I screwed up in several ways. Basically set myself up for failure. Oh well, live and learn.

I could still get on board with Western Express. I have 8 days to decide. Spoke to my recruiter and he said starting cpm is 51 for dry van and 54 for flatbed. I find that hard to believe though- there must be a catch.

Im considering putting this whole truck driving thing on the back-burner for the moment though and re-evaluating things once I'm in a better place.

Thank you all so much for the support and help over the past few months. I would've been very lost, aimless and discouraged without all the help and insights with something so new and unfamiliar to me.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I just got sent home. It was inevitable, I screwed up in several ways. Basically set myself up for failure. Oh well, live and learn.

I could still get on board with Western Express. I have 8 days to decide. Spoke to my recruiter and he said starting cpm is 51 for dry van and 54 for flatbed. I find that hard to believe though- there must be a catch.

Im considering putting this whole truck driving thing on the back-burner for the moment though and re-evaluating things once I'm in a better place.

Thank you all so much for the support and help over the past few months. I would've been very lost, aimless and discouraged without all the help and insights with something so new and unfamiliar to me.

Haya, Garrett;

Did you go ahead & decide to go with Western this week?

Still wishing you well~

~ Anne ~

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Anne,

My application with them actually expired, but all I gotta do is submit another one. Its no issue. My recruiter is still desperately trying to reel me in.

I am heavily debating Schneider and Knight though. Only issue with them is I may not pass the hair drug test... I just got a hair test on my own accord to see if I'd pass. Schneider said if I fail the hair test they report it to the ol drug n alcohol clearinghouse.

I know..Im terrible.

I appreciate you still being interested in my progress though. Ill keep you updated. I feel I should just suck it up and go with Western though. One thing that worries me about them is that their website is literally nothing but a job advertisement though.

Prime actually sent me home because I failed their virtual driving evaluation of all things...

double-quotes-start.png

I just got sent home. It was inevitable, I screwed up in several ways. Basically set myself up for failure. Oh well, live and learn.

I could still get on board with Western Express. I have 8 days to decide. Spoke to my recruiter and he said starting cpm is 51 for dry van and 54 for flatbed. I find that hard to believe though- there must be a catch.

Im considering putting this whole truck driving thing on the back-burner for the moment though and re-evaluating things once I'm in a better place.

Thank you all so much for the support and help over the past few months. I would've been very lost, aimless and discouraged without all the help and insights with something so new and unfamiliar to me.

double-quotes-end.png

Haya, Garrett;

Did you go ahead & decide to go with Western this week?

Still wishing you well~

~ Anne ~

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Hey Anne,

My application with them actually expired, but all I gotta do is submit another one. Its no issue. My recruiter is still desperately trying to reel me in.

I am heavily debating Schneider and Knight though. Only issue with them is I may not pass the hair drug test... I just got a hair test on my own accord to see if I'd pass. Schneider said if I fail the hair test they report it to the ol drug n alcohol clearinghouse.

I know..Im terrible.

I appreciate you still being interested in my progress though. Ill keep you updated. I feel I should just suck it up and go with Western though. One thing that worries me about them is that their website is literally nothing but a job advertisement though.

Prime actually sent me home because I failed their virtual driving evaluation of all things...

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I just got sent home. It was inevitable, I screwed up in several ways. Basically set myself up for failure. Oh well, live and learn.

I could still get on board with Western Express. I have 8 days to decide. Spoke to my recruiter and he said starting cpm is 51 for dry van and 54 for flatbed. I find that hard to believe though- there must be a catch.

Im considering putting this whole truck driving thing on the back-burner for the moment though and re-evaluating things once I'm in a better place.

Thank you all so much for the support and help over the past few months. I would've been very lost, aimless and discouraged without all the help and insights with something so new and unfamiliar to me.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Haya, Garrett;

Did you go ahead & decide to go with Western this week?

Still wishing you well~

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-end.png

Garrett, I'm just me. I know 'some' of the peeps on here, the wise ones .... I'm just me. I care. No holds barred.

SERIOUSLY?!?!? I WOULD GO WITH WESTERN. Hands the HECK **** DOWN!

Riddle me this; are you on Facebook? (I am . . . not asking you to friend me; jus asking...if so: >.) Go to Western, click message. Say something like, "Hi, Abby, Annemarie A. said to say hi!"

Then, CARRY ON with all your questions, concerns, countertop trash, and indeed reviews. Ask her. She's a gem!! I don't 'endorse' a company, until 'I' like what I see.

Personally, I would go with W/E in a heartbeat. Old School's start & story there ALONE, had ME from hello. Every.Dang.Door.Opened.

I'm telling you.. (as I have 'before!' ) I'm old(er) and wiser . . . and I'm pretty familiar with the industry . . . from here & there & my hubby & .. stuff!

Go. With. Western. Risk free. Haven't you been burnt by taking a 'Vegas gamble' already?!?!?

Just, IMHO, man. Might be a few less CHA'ching in the 1st month or three, MIGHT NOT! ...GO TO THEIR WEBSITE, they are increasing ACROSS THE BOARD as WELL!

Man, I really hope you heed this. Some of the peeps on here have been 'silent' lately, but...... I'm almost betting Dollars to Donuts, they'd back THAT UP~~~!!!!!

Best wishes, always!

~ Anne ~

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Garrett, I did start my career at Western Express. My choices ended up being limited. There came a critical realization during the beginning of my trucking career where I determined it wasn't so important who I chose to start with. What became important was that whoever I chose reciprocated with my choice. Western Express did just that - they chose me. I got a great start to my career and I learned a great deal while working for them.

Truck drivers determine their own destiny. This career is completely performance based. The name of the company has no effect on what you can accomplish. That part is on you. Take your responsibility seriously and execute your tasks diligently. There’s not a company name out there that can do those things for you. Make your own mark out here. Don’t rely on names or reputations. None of it will matter when you are out here on your own.

Most people worry themselves excessively over what they think is their critical decision concerning which company to start with. It really is not a very important decision. Far more important is the decision of how you will conduct yourself as a rookie. You can build your own foundation for a great career at just about any trucking company that hires rookies. It would be far better for people to ignore all the chatter online concerning these companies that hire rookies. Most rookies that post those ridiculous online reviews and comments about "starter companies" don't have a clue about what makes for success at this career. They look for the company to be responsible for their success. You simply cannot do that in this business. You will be the only one who is accountable for your success or failure.

I am proud of the time I spent at Western Express. I learned a great deal about how to succeed at trucking. None of that was taught to me by them, but rather by the way I approached the career. Every time there was an issue, I worked on finding a solution. I never reacted with the knee-jerk reaction that says my company was a bad place to start. That is the current train of thought, and it is as bogus as it is irresponsible. It only leads people to jump from one company to the other without ever learning how to be successful at trucking. Get started somewhere that will take you and then prove to yourself and to them that you are capable of handling this job like a professional. That is the best way to get started. The company name is irrelevant.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Garrett, I did start my career at Western Express. My choices ended up being limited. There came a critical realization during the beginning of my trucking career where I determined it wasn't so important who I chose to start with. What became important was that whoever I chose reciprocated with my choice. Western Express did just that - they chose me. I got a great start to my career and I learned a great deal while working for them.

Truck drivers determine their own destiny. This career is completely performance based. The name of the company has no effect on what you can accomplish. That part is on you. Take your responsibility seriously and execute your tasks diligently. There’s not a company name out there that can do those things for you. Make your own mark out here. Don’t rely on names or reputations. None of it will matter when you are out here on your own.

Most people worry themselves excessively over what they think is their critical decision concerning which company to start with. It really is not a very important decision. Far more important is the decision of how you will conduct yourself as a rookie. You can build your own foundation for a great career at just about any trucking company that hires rookies. It would be far better for people to ignore all the chatter online concerning these companies that hire rookies. Most rookies that post those ridiculous online reviews and comments about "starter companies" don't have a clue about what makes for success at this career. They look for the company to be responsible for their success. You simply cannot do that in this business. You will be the only one who is accountable for your success or failure.

I am proud of the time I spent at Western Express. I learned a great deal about how to succeed at trucking. None of that was taught to me by them, but rather by the way I approached the career. Every time there was an issue, I worked on finding a solution. I never reacted with the knee-jerk reaction that says my company was a bad place to start. That is the current train of thought, and it is as bogus as it is irresponsible. It only leads people to jump from one company to the other without ever learning how to be successful at trucking. Get started somewhere that will take you and then prove to yourself and to them that you are capable of handling this job like a professional. That is the best way to get started. The company name is irrelevant.

Very wise words...

I was starting to suspect a lot of the truths you mentioned there. Thank you for confirming my suspicions.

Got orientation with WE on Monday...wish me luck!

My only concern is that I want to do OTR flatbed but my recruiter said I'll be starting in dry van for a few weeks then they'll route me Nashville to do their securement training and switch to flatbed. Just hoping I can really take his word on that...cuz flatbed is probably the biggest draw WE has for me. Also I hope I'll be busy enough/be getting enough loads doing flatbed here in Southern California... It seems most, if not all of their flatbed business is East of the Mississippi. I just hope my location doesn't turn out to be detrimental to having a steady work flow.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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