Ohh The Nerves

Topic 30616 | Page 1

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Christopher L.'s Comment
member avatar

I have decided to do the company sponsored CDL training at Schneider. I plan on applying tonight, but I'm getting really really nervous. It's a big change. The other job (local) I could get will not be until next year, and with that time I could already get a local opportunity with an established major company (this job security).

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I started with Schneider. Did two years before switching to a Southeast Regional company.

Schneider was great to me and it was a terrific experience.

Good luck!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Christopher L.'s Comment
member avatar

So I applied tonight. It it around 9:30pm not to wait on them to call me.

Christopher L.'s Comment
member avatar

After speaking with a recruiter, who was a total sweetheart and very understanding, I have decided to go to a local CDL school and then I could apply for a home daily job through Schneider that way I can go to church on Wednesdays and Sundays and still persue my dream of being a truck driver.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hopefully it works out for you Christopher. It is not the way we would recommend, but you have very limited options. I'll just tell you right up front that the success rate of your plan is extremely low.

Most people do not understand how hard it is to start this career without making a few minor mistakes. One of the most common rookie mistakes is bumping into something while trying to back that monstrous truck into some incredibly tight places. It happens. I dare say it happens way more than you would ever imagine. Over the road trucking companies expect a few mistakes from their rookie drivers. They are self insured and are prepared for the consequences. Most local jobs are in a more precarious position with their insurance underwriters. Most of the time they are forced to get rid of a driver once they’ve had an accident.

What happens to the driver in this unenviable position? It’s as though they’ve ended up in some mysterious trucking purgatory. Nobody will hire them. They are caught in a dilemma from which they can’t escape. The other local companies can’t hire them because of the accident, and the large carriers can’t take them because they are considered as inexperienced drivers with a stale CDL. Nobody counts their local driving as experience, and they are typically too far past their graduation date from trucking school to be considered as viable candidates.

You would be in good hands with Schneider, that's for sure. Their training, though concise, is well done. What you do while driving will determine if they can keep you at it or not.

You already know you can't serve two masters, so focus on who is going to be your master and let the chips fall where they will. You may discover that you can manage both of these jobs well. I hope you can. There's nothing wrong with being a pastor and a laborer. Paul was a great tent maker while being an excellent apostle. You have to earn a living, and if the church can't support you properly, then you need a career to help with that for a while.

Please, keep us posted on your progress.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Christopher L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hopefully it works out for you Christopher. It is not the way we would recommend, but you have very limited options. I'll just tell you right up front that the success rate of your plan is extremely low.

Most people do not understand how hard it is to start this career without making a few minor mistakes. One of the most common rookie mistakes is bumping into something while trying to back that monstrous truck into some incredibly tight places. It happens. I dare say it happens way more than you would ever imagine. Over the road trucking companies expect a few mistakes from their rookie drivers. They are self insured and are prepared for the consequences. Most local jobs are in a more precarious position with their insurance underwriters. Most of the time they are forced to get rid of a driver once they’ve had an accident.

What happens to the driver in this unenviable position? It’s as though they’ve ended up in some mysterious trucking purgatory. Nobody will hire them. They are caught in a dilemma from which they can’t escape. The other local companies can’t hire them because of the accident, and the large carriers can’t take them because they are considered as inexperienced drivers with a stale CDL. Nobody counts their local driving as experience, and they are typically too far past their graduation date from trucking school to be considered as viable candidates.

You would be in good hands with Schneider, that's for sure. Their training, though concise, is well done. What you do while driving will determine if they can keep you at it or not.

You already know you can't serve two masters, so focus on who is going to be your master and let the chips fall where they will. You may discover that you can manage both of these jobs well. I hope you can. There's nothing wrong with being a pastor and a laborer. Paul was a great tent maker while being an excellent apostle. You have to earn a living, and if the church can't support you properly, then you need a career to help with that for a while.

Please, keep us posted on your progress.

Are you telling me I should take the regional job to start with, and then transfer to local? Their home daily routes available are a J.C. Penny account, and there is an intermodal account? The regional account would get me home Saturday morning and I would leave Monday at 7am, but I would be forced to go to NYC as it is in the account they listed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Chris, Old School mentioned Schneider as a good choice. I agree, Schneider does a great job training and is big in Ohio. I believe they have at least two, maybe 3 operation centers in Ohio.

Oh, BTW, you'll need some blue collar work clothes. I've never seen a driver wearing a suit! Hehe

Christopher L.'s Comment
member avatar

Chris, Old School mentioned Schneider as a good choice. I agree, Schneider does a great job training and is big in Ohio. I believe they have at least two, maybe 3 operation centers in Ohio.

Oh, BTW, you'll need some blue collar work clothes. I've never seen a driver wearing a suit! Hehe

Lol that was from a recent wedding I was in, and I said it is the last time I will wear a 3 piece, I usually rock cargo pants and a polo

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Are you telling me I should take the regional job to start with, and then transfer to local? Their home daily routes available are a J.C. Penny account, and there is an intermodal account?

No, I may have rambled on too much about local driving jobs not being the best to start with. Normally that holds true, and I believe it still holds true for you also. There is more risk involved and it is oftentimes a small local company doing those type jobs. You have a unique situation that requires you to be home Wednesday nights and Sundays. Schneider is a great company and doesn't have the same insurance concerns that a small local company deals with. I would never recommend you to take a regional job that dispatches to NYC. That is just not good advice for a greenhorn rookie. Stick with a home daily route. It is what you need. Do your best and trust the Almighty to help you deal with the additional risks involved.

I can't advise on which one of those home daily jobs would be better. I honestly don't have a clue. Go with what they are really needing most or use your own gut feeling. I know which one I would choose, but it would only be because I don't see much of a future for the J.C. Penney company. Of course I swore up and down that Elon Musk would never make it like he has either. You can never count on my advice for investments. I like to think I know what I'm talking about, but the markets prove me wrong more than I like! Based on my history of picking winners and losers in business, you probably should shun the intermodal account and go with J.C. Penney.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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