PSD/Orientation With Prime Inc., Springfield MO

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Mark M.'s Comment
member avatar

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Well not much to say about TNT other then you drive. Try to sleep on the bumpy roads, which is rough.

Learning macros, paperwork, real world backing. How to accept loads and talk to shippers and recievers

Pretty good stuff. So far picking up what I need to know.

Feeling good and still loving the job.

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Thank you for the updates Mark! Could you clarify, are you doing TNT pulling a flatbed? I haven’t heard you talk about securement or other flatbed specific details. I am about a week away from testing for my CDL in Salt Lake City (they are incredibly backed up here!) and it sounds like I will be doing TNT on a reefer , then return to do bootcamp and some additional flatbed specific drive time after that. hearing all of the same talk about shortage of trainers that I am working on this thread. What is true? Who knows!

CDL test was pretty easy, dont sweat that!

No im reefer, decided to do this first and see what's what. Never have driven anything bigger then a humvee so I wanted my first timenti be easy.

And yeah they are short on trainers, that being said only took a week to get mine. And I got paid for that week.

Good luck man! Hope to see you out there!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Moose's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-end.png

CDL test was pretty easy, dont sweat that!

No im reefer , decided to do this first and see what's what. Never have driven anything bigger then a humvee so I wanted my first timenti be easy.

And yeah they are short on trainers, that being said only took a week to get mine. And I got paid for that week.

Good luck man! Hope to see you out there!

Thanks Mark! Safe travels over the winter!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Mark M.'s Comment
member avatar

Update.

Stopped at Pittston yard and got a shower, our load didn't deliver till Sunday evening and it was Saturday morning.

I went to the driver's lounge with my laptop so he could sleep. When it was my turn I was like hey let me get sleep. He was like cool. Then an hour later came to truck and turned in the heat.

Half hour later it was over 90 degrees in tip bunk and I could sleep. I finally just grabbed my stuff at 1145pm and went back to driver lounge.

Fast forward to today and I'm driving, he opens curtain and is like "change effing lanes!" I I'd as told. Middle lane was just as bad. Mind you I've had maybe 6 hours sleep in days. Then I get to fueling location and he tells me to park he can't sleep because of the bumps.

Now I'm sitting in the subway wasting 5 amd a half hours of driveline.

I hate this. I just want to get these miles out of the way. Not sure why this guy wanted to be a trainer.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Not sure why this guy wanted to be a trainer.

Money. That's why most of them become trainers, ESPECIALLY the Fleece Drivers.

Why else would someone volunteer for the extra stress and frustration, sacrifice miles driven, and surrender their space and privacy to a different stranger every few months? "Love of the industry"? Doubtful.

Hang in there! Eventually you'll be a solo driver. Just think of this as paying those dues.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

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Not sure why this guy wanted to be a trainer.

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Money. That's why most of them become trainers, ESPECIALLY the Fleece Drivers.

Why else would someone volunteer for the extra stress and frustration, sacrifice miles driven, and surrender their space and privacy to a different stranger every few months? "Love of the industry"? Doubtful.

Hang in there! Eventually you'll be a solo driver. Just think of this as paying those dues.

Maybe some like the company? It does get lonely at times, right?

dancing-dog.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Update.

Stopped at Pittston yard and got a shower, our load didn't deliver till Sunday evening and it was Saturday morning.

I went to the driver's lounge with my laptop so he could sleep. When it was my turn I was like hey let me get sleep. He was like cool. Then an hour later came to truck and turned in the heat.

Half hour later it was over 90 degrees in tip bunk and I could sleep. I finally just grabbed my stuff at 1145pm and went back to driver lounge.

Fast forward to today and I'm driving, he opens curtain and is like "change effing lanes!" I I'd as told. Middle lane was just as bad. Mind you I've had maybe 6 hours sleep in days. Then I get to fueling location and he tells me to park he can't sleep because of the bumps.

Now I'm sitting in the subway wasting 5 amd a half hours of driveline.

I hate this. I just want to get these miles out of the way. Not sure why this guy wanted to be a trainer.

Mark,

I think of you (and your plight) often. A friend of mine (whom I met on here) had a similar situation with Kerry's current company. It didn't end well. Email is in my profile, if desired.

His lack of sleep, similar to yours, will probably prohibit this candidate from ever driving a semi again. It's all good, things worked all for the better, but still. He's now a handyman . . . running his own business with a dear friend of HIS on board; all's well that ends 'WELL.' (Or.. shall we say, ends 'okay?') I'm just really concerned. I've been with a 'sleep deprived' guy ... in his early days; and there would be times he had a 34, and I would literally send our young kids to the NEIGHBORS' homes, so he could SLEEP. Yep. To this day, HIS sleep is paramount. The rest of us'll work it out.

https://csa.fmcsa.dot.gov/SafetyPlanner/MyFiles/SubSections.aspx?ch=21&sec=59&sub=109

Sorry, it's not clickable .. .no clue why.

I literally showed up at a hearing (or 2) for said person citing the FMCSA 4.1.4 continuum . . . memorize this; please. ML didn't.

Best wishes always, good sir!~ KNOW YOUR RIGHTS, man!

~ Anne ~

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Mark M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Update.

Stopped at Pittston yard and got a shower, our load didn't deliver till Sunday evening and it was Saturday morning.

I went to the driver's lounge with my laptop so he could sleep. When it was my turn I was like hey let me get sleep. He was like cool. Then an hour later came to truck and turned in the heat.

Half hour later it was over 90 degrees in tip bunk and I could sleep. I finally just grabbed my stuff at 1145pm and went back to driver lounge.

Fast forward to today and I'm driving, he opens curtain and is like "change effing lanes!" I I'd as told. Middle lane was just as bad. Mind you I've had maybe 6 hours sleep in days. Then I get to fueling location and he tells me to park he can't sleep because of the bumps.

Now I'm sitting in the subway wasting 5 amd a half hours of driveline.

I hate this. I just want to get these miles out of the way. Not sure why this guy wanted to be a trainer.

double-quotes-end.png

Mark,

I think of you (and your plight) often. A friend of mine (whom I met on here) had a similar situation with Kerry's current company. It didn't end well. Email is in my profile, if desired.

His lack of sleep, similar to yours, will probably prohibit this candidate from ever driving a semi again. It's all good, things worked all for the better, but still. He's now a handyman . . . running his own business with a dear friend of HIS on board; all's well that ends 'WELL.' (Or.. shall we say, ends 'okay?') I'm just really concerned. I've been with a 'sleep deprived' guy ... in his early days; and there would be times he had a 34, and I would literally send our young kids to the NEIGHBORS' homes, so he could SLEEP. Yep. To this day, HIS sleep is paramount. The rest of us'll work it out.

https://csa.fmcsa.dot.gov/SafetyPlanner/MyFiles/SubSections.aspx?ch=21&sec=59&sub=109

Sorry, it's not clickable .. .no clue why.

I literally showed up at a hearing (or 2) for said person citing the FMCSA 4.1.4 continuum . . . memorize this; please. ML didn't.

Best wishes always, good sir!~ KNOW YOUR RIGHTS, man!

~ Anne ~

I'm not worried about a critical incident, or ticket. I've spent a long time in the military and other environments with training that I can stay alert.

What bothers me his seemingly complete lack of care whether I get sleep or not. Its his lease truck, his business.

I'm over halfway through I think so I should nake it. Trust me when I say if I can't do it, I'll stop the truck and sleep.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Mark M.'s Comment
member avatar

Quick update. 22.5k miles in.

Now stuck in Texas. Dispatch gave ys a load that picked up on Sunday amd delivers Thursday midnight.

Only 2400 miles away. We got there Tuesday at 1pm. They did they had no room. So we sit here doing nothing until Thursday at midnight.

I'm pretty ****ed. Trainer is all "waaahhhh I won't get this on this pay period!". I'm like your still getting paid for it though, while my training progress is stopped.

Anyway, have found that when I take my 30 minute break to take a nap. This has reset me each day, given me a second wind.

Thanks for reading, will update soon.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Quick update. 22.5k miles in.

Now stuck in Texas. Dispatch gave ys a load that picked up on Sunday amd delivers Thursday midnight.

Only 2400 miles away. We got there Tuesday at 1pm. They did they had no room. So we sit here doing nothing until Thursday at midnight.

I'm pretty ****ed. Trainer is all "waaahhhh I won't get this on this pay period!". I'm like your still getting paid for it though, while my training progress is stopped.

Anyway, have found that when I take my 30 minute break to take a nap. This has reset me each day, given me a second wind.

Thanks for reading, will update soon.

I'm still following, Mark!

Glad that 30 powernap has managed to help ya; a 20 minute does that for my guy, too!

Well dang about being stuck in TX, better than being stuck in, let's say ... Cali, or Iowa right now, tho! :)

Best wishes; almost there!

~ Anne ~

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mark M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Quick update. 22.5k miles in.

Now stuck in Texas. Dispatch gave ys a load that picked up on Sunday amd delivers Thursday midnight.

Only 2400 miles away. We got there Tuesday at 1pm. They did they had no room. So we sit here doing nothing until Thursday at midnight.

I'm pretty ****ed. Trainer is all "waaahhhh I won't get this on this pay period!". I'm like your still getting paid for it though, while my training progress is stopped.

Anyway, have found that when I take my 30 minute break to take a nap. This has reset me each day, given me a second wind.

Thanks for reading, will update soon.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm still following, Mark!

Glad that 30 powernap has managed to help ya; a 20 minute does that for my guy, too!

Well dang about being stuck in TX, better than being stuck in, let's say ... Cali, or Iowa right now, tho! :)

Best wishes; almost there!

~ Anne ~

Haha already told my dispatch I HATE Cali!!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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