Having Difficulty Starting A Driving Career. Need Advice Please

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TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Hello Drivers. Just want to share the situation I went through before my question.

I have been dealing with a recruiter from CRST for 2 weeks. The first day seemed normal with gathering my information and talking about available positions. Called me back 3 days later and asked if I had my CDL or if I needed training. We discussed that 3 days ago so I was confused on why she asked. She told me about a dedicated regional position for dry van , again we already talked about that and I agreed it sounded good. Told me they would do a background check and call me back within 2 days. A week goes by without any updates so I called her and her response was "oh yea, everything came back fine." Asked again if I had my CDL. Told her yes. Then set up a drug testing at a facility about 30min from where I live. Did the drug testing, hair and urine, and called to say it was completed. Got a call 3 days later which is today and said everything is fine except my driving history from the past 6 months was incomplete. Then tells me the position is for drivers with 6+ months of experience smh.... I was also talking with a recruiter from Knight but put him on hold for now because he couldn't give me an answer about home time, CPM , sign on bonus, layover or detention pay. All he told me was a flatbed and dry van opening that averages 2500 miles a week. 2 day orientation, 4-6 weeks training $800 a week. The TMC recruiter that had me come in gave me more information about their company than any other recruiter I spoke with so far... things just didn't work out for me there....

My question... Is it normal for recruiters not to know anything or give me exact information about the company? Should I blindly just go with Knight and the little info he gave me?? Seems like I'm having bad luck trying to start this driving career. Any suggestions on how I should pursue this career will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for reading. Stay safe out there!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Have you tried CFI? We are mostly dry van with a growing temp controlled division and growing regional and dedicated openings. If you have a CDL fresh from school, they will send you out with a trainer for about 21 days. I don't know if orientation is two or three days. I think they are only offering hiring bonuses to experienced drivers.

They cover all transportation and hotels.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

I haven't called CFI. Thanks. I will put them on the list with Schneider, Swift, Roehl, May, Prime, Dollar general, and Western Express. At this point I will work for whoever calls me first lol.

Brian S.'s Comment
member avatar

Over the last few months I’ve talked to recruiters from Roehl, Prime, and Schneider and they were very professional and on top of their game.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Drivers. Just want to share the situation I went through before my question.

I have been dealing with a recruiter from CRST for 2 weeks. The first day seemed normal with gathering my information and talking about available positions. Called me back 3 days later and asked if I had my CDL or if I needed training. We discussed that 3 days ago so I was confused on why she asked. She told me about a dedicated regional position for dry van , again we already talked about that and I agreed it sounded good. Told me they would do a background check and call me back within 2 days. A week goes by without any updates so I called her and her response was "oh yea, everything came back fine." Asked again if I had my CDL. Told her yes. Then set up a drug testing at a facility about 30min from where I live. Did the drug testing, hair and urine, and called to say it was completed. Got a call 3 days later which is today and said everything is fine except my driving history from the past 6 months was incomplete. Then tells me the position is for drivers with 6+ months of experience smh.... I was also talking with a recruiter from Knight but put him on hold for now because he couldn't give me an answer about home time, CPM , sign on bonus, layover or detention pay. All he told me was a flatbed and dry van opening that averages 2500 miles a week. 2 day orientation, 4-6 weeks training $800 a week. The TMC recruiter that had me come in gave me more information about their company than any other recruiter I spoke with so far... things just didn't work out for me there....

My question... Is it normal for recruiters not to know anything or give me exact information about the company? Should I blindly just go with Knight and the little info he gave me?? Seems like I'm having bad luck trying to start this driving career. Any suggestions on how I should pursue this career will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for reading. Stay safe out there!

Howdy again, TwoSides !!!

I'm not a driver, but the wife of one for 20 years. I do some 'freelance' work within the trucking industry, and I feel your pain. The 'driver shortage' scare . . . and the hub bub at the ports, has many companies chasing their tails at times; and recruiters' right hands not knowing what the lefties are doing.

Werner emails us (for my guy) about 1x a week (along w/ other carriers) and depending upon WHOM the email is from, it's different information. The only constant is that it's a 'local' WalMart account. (Hey, cool for THEM, getting a piece of that pie!)

That's ODD that CRST wanted 6 months' experience .. was it a dedicated account, then?!?!? Maybe WM?!? Hmmm...

Re: Knight; There are posts within this forum, about their wait times; for school AND trainers; look them up by Knight in the keyword search, and PLEASE read Davy's comments regarding such. That should help some.

Did you fill out the app provided on TT ?? Did you hear from Wilson Logistics at all?? << They'd be high on my list. Read Vicki M's (and other peeps!) diaries. I'd go after that one, personally.

Had you applied here? You should: Apply For Paid CDL Training

I've got a few training companies I can bounce you names to, or you could look at the list that Kerry (username) has running right now, and maybe look into some of those?

It's just a bit of a 'rate' and 'supply/demand' (almost in reverse, it seems) going on out there right now. Brett will vouch for that. It's hard to make heads & tails of this industry most times, but especially here as of late.

I hope this helps 'a bit' ..... please let me know!

Best to ya, always ~

~ Anne ~

Over the last few months I’ve talked to recruiters from Roehl, Prime, and Schneider and they were very professional and on top of their game.

Brian:

Are you following up with THOSE guys, then?? Who'd YOU decide on. . . or did I miss it elsewhere?!?!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I haven't called CFI. Thanks. I will put them on the list with Schneider, Swift, Roehl, May, Prime, Dollar general, and Western Express. At this point I will work for whoever calls me first lol.

AND ... YES, I did see you used this site's app.. I now remember the TMC hubbub.

Apologies.

A few other training companies: DML (Dutch Maid Logistics) here in Ohio, MAST trucking, (Ohio, as well,) Witte Brothers (they don't advertise, but they sure do train, in a manual!,) and Raider Express. Maybe Covenant, too. Don't know much about them.

Heard that May is training now as well. Marten, I don't believe, trains. Could change in a day; like Carolina & Western! LoL.

A few MORE for you to check out!!! (Sorry I forgot the app & TMC... oops.. sorry!)

LMK,

~ Anne ~

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

CRST doesn't require ANY experience. If you have your CDL , it should be a walk in the park. BUT You do realize they are mainly a TEAM driver company? The Only "Solo" Regional is with their sister company they bought out in 2016-17, "Gardners" I did transfer to Gardners for all of 2 months, and went back to CRST. Was NO $$ at Gardners.

Heard some like it there, and do ok. But it was more of a cluster &*(^ and I was a runner, and told my DM there that, keep me burning the miles up, HA not! But everyone has different experiences at different places too, no big deal, I just transferred back.....

From MY experience with my recruiter at CRST when I started back in Sept 2019, was good for the most part. But DMs and recruiters come and go. Maybe ask for another who is more up to speed you could be dealing with a newbie...That's if you're up for team driving, took my 4th co-driver(year 2) to find a good 1 , that could actually DRIVE lol And we drove together for 1 year he left, when I left, he's doing a solo local gig, elsewhere.....

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brian S.'s Comment
member avatar

Brian:

Are you following up with THOSE guys, then?? Who'd YOU decide on. . . or did I miss it elsewhere?!?!

~ Anne ~

Thanks for asking Anne, Yes I have followed up with them and I’ve decided on Schneider. All three companies have excellent training programs and seem to take good care of their drivers. I have my pre-employment drug screen on Monday and should be in training by the middle of November.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar
That's ODD that CRST wanted 6 months' experience .. was it a dedicated account, then?!?!? Maybe WM?!? Hmmm...

Not sure Anne, the recruiter didn't say. After 2 weeks of dealing with her she comes back and says the opening is for 6 months experience and doesn't see any solo regional positions open for inexperienced drivers.

A few other training companies: DML (Dutch Maid Logistics) here in Ohio, MAST trucking, (Ohio, as well,) Witte Brothers (they don't advertise, but they sure do train, in a manual!,) and Raider Express. Maybe Covenant, too. Don't know much about them.

Hey Anne thanks for the list. I do remember you sending them to me a few weeks ago. Appreciate that. Yes you do remember I filled out the sites app 2 weeks ago for the 2nd time but I only heard from CRST this time.

CRST doesn't require ANY experience. If you have your CDL , it should be a walk in the park. BUT You do realize they are mainly a TEAM driver company? 

No I didn't realize that Stevo. The recruiter didn't mention that at all. I asked for a solo regional position. Team and OTR is not what I'm looking for

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

That's why the 6 months then. I got recruited to transfer after my 7th month, once she said "SOLO" and .47 com I said let's do it. Hahaha wasn't what I was told but I told her I gave it my all, wasn't worth it.....CPM means nothing without the miles....

So yeah that's the ONLY solo gig they have. Prime, Roehl, Knight, probably have best rates not sure....I've recently gotten a lot of Schneider emails recruiting, but pay was a big step down so I delete emails.

Besides, January my Soc Sec checks start coming in, I'd take one of a couple 1099 gigs until then and make $9-11k a month, until then smile.gif

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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