Hoping For Some Advice?

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Brian J.'s Comment
member avatar

In 2019 I was three weeks out of training and I had my own truck working a hands on delivery route. I was in west Texas and it was extremely hot. I got so sick from the heat that I almost called 911, but kept cooling off in the rig and finished, other than picking up the empty carts. I called the company’s designated Safety Team and told them what was going on. They asked if I felt good enough to return to the DC? Yes,

It was about 3 hours back to the DC, and left for home for a 10-hour reset after getting back to the DC. I had severe cramping throughout the night and by morning, I was just exhausted. I arrived at the dispatch to get load information, but also express to my Freight Manager that I was just exhausted and told him about calling Safety and I really needed to rest.

Well, he asked me if I could just take this one load that morning, and it would even be not too far from my home, and I would be allowed to take the weekend off, since that was going to be my off weekend anyway. Very reluctantly, I said okay. I’d only been there lest than 30 days and of course want to make a good employee for the company.

I know, I know, I’m the Captain of my own ship!!! Believe me, I wish I could go back. But I didn’t, I went to my destination and turned on the dirt road that leads to the destination. The soft side gave out and I had a rollover. I could say partial rollover, cause trailer rolled, but of course severely torked the frame of the truck. No vehicles around, and I was only going slow enough to turn, so I was not injured in any way.

Due to me calling Safety the evening before complicated the company in wanting to fire me right away, but after about 30 days they did just that. After all, ultimately it was my fault. I should have said no, no matter what pressure my manager tried to put on me.

Sorry for long story, but this is what has brought me to request advice from those that know the industry, of which I know very little. I initially tried to get hired by other companies, but it became obvious that was not going to happen with that incident on my record. Some companies would say, “if you can get 6 months experience, etc…” By next summer, it will have been over 3 years since the incident. My wife is a Trucker and she’s been doing it since we both got our CDL’s over 3 years ago and we hoped to Team drive together.

So, is it possible to get rehired after this incident has fallen off? Thank you for any advice!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

Brian, Not going to belabor the shoulda woulda coulda, you've already lived that. I will say for anyine else that heat, nausea, and cramping are signs of a heat injury. If you stop perspiring or urinating, or you produce urine looking like tea or coffee, 911 is the route to take. The life you save could be your own. Or mine.CDC Heat Injury Info

Use the link hereApply For Truck Driving Jobs and here Paid CDL Training Programs (depending on what kind of feedback you get) on applications.

Putting apps out will give you that chance to talk to a recruiter. Good luck to you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brian J.'s Comment
member avatar

Mr. Curmudgeon, thank you for your reply. Much appreciated! Yeah, I didn't want it to be a work related incident, otherwise I should have called that ambulance. Ironically, that's what my job was prior to getting a CDL , is Safety (handling work related incidents) :)

I'd like to know mostly from guys like yourself with, lot's of knowledge and experience, is this something that with time I can overcome and get hired again.

Thank you sir!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Mr. Curmudgeon, thank you for your reply. Much appreciated! Yeah, I didn't want it to be a work related incident, otherwise I should have called that ambulance. Ironically, that's what my job was prior to getting a CDL , is Safety (handling work related incidents) :)

I'd like to know mostly from guys like yourself with, lot's of knowledge and experience, is this something that with time I can overcome and get hired again.

Thank you sir!

Howdy, Brian J.; and welcome to TT !!!!

IMHO, indeed you can. (Read my 'bio' in the 'Personal Stuff' thread; I should copy & paste it IN my actual bio; haha!)

First off, memorize THIS: FMCSA / Coercion . . . I've thought about tattooing it on my husband's left hand facing him; he's a lefty!

Considering the time it's been, you 'may' need a refresher course. Sadly, Western Express doesn't train/refresh anymore, but . . . you COULD call them; or if you do Facebook...when you message them, Abbey will be happy to help you. She's awesome.

Second; DML (Dutch Maid Logistics) here by me in Ohio, is 'another' 2nd chance company; they might take a chance on you. Trans Am is another possibility; as they purportedly have 'no' training.....and are lenient. Also, since you know 'how' to drive, that might work for ya!

Lastly; READ Persion Conversion's thread: The Persian Conversion's EPIC thread (with pix!)

Best wishes, Brian. Let us know what (if anything else!) we can do.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

Brian, I think it is possible for you to get hired.

Apply. Discuss, acknowledge your mistakes and dont, imo, try to color them as anyone else's but your own. Rationalization is never your friend with an oops on the record.

Like Anne said, the refresher, or even going back through a paid CDL course with a company, is a definite possibility given the 'stale' nature of your 30 days of experience.

Each outfit (and their insurance provider) will have different levels of risk they will accept. The only way to find the places that will accept your risk is to apply to places. Many places. Their hiring teams will be able to discuss your circumstances and let you know. It will bw time consuming, but worth the aggravation

Good luck to you, and keep us posted on your progress!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

The way you stated everything says you took responsibility and learned from it. That is great. I would call recruiters and start out with your story. CFI takes people on a case by case basis. I would give them a shot.

Mention your wife and desire to team.

Brian J.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Anne, and Mr. Curmudgeon,

I will gladly review FMCSA / Coercion, or any advice you kindly folks offer! I know ultimately that was my fault, and I wish I would have had the strength to tell Fleet Manager no. After the incident, I was able to go back to the same work for a Tribal Government as prior to getting my CDL. However, I'm hoping this incident will fall off my record in latter 2022, and that some Trucking Company will give me a chance again. I've just been biding time.... and hoping.

So I've been watching the calendar and wanted to start trying learn from those that may know if it is possible to overcome basically a rollover, regardless of the reason why. I've even thought about buying my own truck and trying to go Independent, but I need to even learn if its possible to come back from an incident like I had.

Thank you guys, any information you have the time to offer, I'm all ears!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brian J.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you Big Scott for your reply! Oh I took responsibility.... kind of :) Yes, I should have said no that morning....what would they have done? Now looking back, nothing. But, I was in my early 50's and had only been in work where you do the extra, so you're showing you're a good employee. Even at my age at the time I was naïve.

At my school where I got my CDI, my trainer, or teacher..... he came from CFL, a real old school guy, but a wonderful guy. What a great dude!

Thank you all!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Brian, what was this destination that took you on an unstable dirt road? If your company sent you that route they are at least partially to blame. If I was directed to take an unpaved road I would refuse to go. Fortunately, Schneider doesn’t do that. Maybe you should discuss this with an attorney if everything you said is true.

Brian J.'s Comment
member avatar

Bruce K, I live here and ultimately it is my fault. It's a company that had no designated right route, and they rightly encourage drivers to study an entrance to any specific facility. Unfortunately, a lot of these were built with no regard to blind side backs. So, small town.....blind side back.....ain't hard to figure out what company. But...that dont matter, I just want to figure out what is possible.

And Schneider is actually the company my wife's uncle is a trainer for out of Indiana. So they seem great! I basically want to know from people in the business is it possible for an incident to drop off and I be employable. So appreciate any opinion or thoughts. Thank you

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