Is There Hope For My Trucking Career?

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SoTexMike's Comment
member avatar

So i have been studying feverishly for my CDL permit test (tomorrow morning) and recently forwarded my medical clearance to my potential training programs recruiter who has been stellar. After sending the long form portion of the physical (in which i admitted to failing a post employment drug screen almost 30 years ago) she called me back and informed me that the company wouldn't take a chance on hiring me. I admit to being a little bummed out. I also don't want to give up unless there is no way that i can get hired in this industry. This is something i thought long and hard about doing and am still pretty excited about it.

The recruiter suggested trying out a Mega. i wanted to start somewhere in the middle as far as size and hoped someone would have suggestions for a rookie training for a CDL out of Texas.

Thanks in advance and keep on trucking!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Why not start with a large carrier?

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Would a failed post employment drug test from 30 years ago still be on your record? I have no clue, I am honestly asking. If it wouldn't be then don't admit it to any employer. Not even the docs doing your physical. Only admit to what they will eventually find out by searching so you don't waste your time or theirs.

Most, if not all, the drivers on here will recommend that you start with a larger carrier. If your not looking to drive regional or OTR then hopefully someone on here will have info for you about companies in the Texas area.

Good luck with the permit test tomorrow ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

PackRatโ€™s question is very pertinent. Many drivers, experienced or new, drive for โ€œmegaโ€ companies and are happy and well paid. There are many here who post comments favorable to their particular mega. There are many advantages to starting your career with a company with โ€œmegaโ€ resources for their new drivers.

SoTexMike's Comment
member avatar

Why not indeed?

How big of a deal is a three decade old failed test to transportation companies? The background check and everything else came back fine, but for whatever reason, this was the red flag?. I was taken aback that my early twenties was somehow lurking in the background all this time (and a from company that vanished from the face of the earth renting movies no less). I hope another training program will give me a shot. i plan to contact a few after i take (and pass) my permit test tomorrow.

I have learned so much from this site and others concerning how best to choose a situation. I commend the mods who dissuade drivers from talking trash about the big carriers but there isn't that kind of effort on other forums. I'd be lying if I said i wasnt a little wary of the big dogs.

What I would like to do is train somewhere near home if possible in SE TX (not a deal breaker for me) and receive the kind of training that my 1st choice offered re: class size and trainer student ratio.

cheers

BTW. so far i am thinking of Swift, Schneider and PAM for big carriers

Why not start with a large carrier?

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

SoTexMike's Comment
member avatar

Would a failed post employment drug test from 30 years ago still be on your record? I have no clue, I am honestly asking. If it wouldn't be then don't admit it to any employer. Not even the docs doing your physical. Only admit to what they will eventually find out by searching so you don't waste your time or theirs.

Most, if not all, the drivers on here will recommend that you start with a larger carrier. If your not looking to drive regional or OTR then hopefully someone on here will have info for you about companies in the Texas area.

Good luck with the permit test tomorrow ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ

I voluteered the info. I dont even know why i did. not like they could have verified it but I guess it was my naievite on display. I honestly thought it wouldnt make a difference. I am definitely looking to drive OTR/regional but i have heard companies with terminals near home make life easier to get home when necessary. thanks for the reply

Cheers

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Would a failed post employment drug test from 30 years ago still be on your record? I have no clue, I am honestly asking. If it wouldn't be then don't admit it to any employer. Not even the docs doing your physical. Only admit to what they will eventually find out by searching so you don't waste your time or theirs.

Most, if not all, the drivers on here will recommend that you start with a larger carrier. If your not looking to drive regional or OTR then hopefully someone on here will have info for you about companies in the Texas area.

Good luck with the permit test tomorrow ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ

double-quotes-end.png

I voluteered the info. I dont even know why i did. not like they could have verified it but I guess it was my naievite on display. I honestly thought it wouldnt make a difference. I am definitely looking to drive OTR/regional but i have heard companies with terminals near home make life easier to get home when necessary. thanks for the reply

Cheers

Haya, Mike.

A guy named Scott (who hasn't been back to report the 'retort') posted on a similar situation, a small while ago.

Stevens and Scott's Conundrum: Stevens Send Home Thread >>

Seriously, this is NUTS. I've got NO reply, but pretty sure my trucker wasn't ever 'asked' to report what he 'did' 20 or 30 years ago; and cannabis would be the worst. No DUI's, no 'hard stuff.'

Did you read the question, ACCURATELY???? Did it say 'EVER?'

You should REALLY 'apply here:' >>Apply For Paid CDL Training

Also, 'nearby' training: Knight, PAM, Stevens (shhhhh!!,) McClane (I recommend!,) and Raider Express. All training companies, with terminals in Texas. Last two are BASED in TX, I believe.

So many mods and veterans on here will QUANTIFY that a terminal near home has LITTLE TO NO impact, on home time. I can tell you stories, but... Just won't....for now. Look at Big Scott, for instance. He lives in NC, and is in Joplin, now .. for company stuff, at the 'main' (I believe) terminal. He gets home/goes home ALL THE TIME he WANTS!

I'll be thinking of more; as I can. I like your avatar but rather >>! Just be YOU.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Would a failed post employment drug test from 30 years ago still be on your record? I have no clue, I am honestly asking. If it wouldn't be then don't admit it to any employer. Not even the docs doing your physical. Only admit to what they will eventually find out by searching so you don't waste your time or theirs.

Most, if not all, the drivers on here will recommend that you start with a larger carrier. If your not looking to drive regional or OTR then hopefully someone on here will have info for you about companies in the Texas area.

Good luck with the permit test tomorrow ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ

Good question, you!!

My thing is ... if they 'imbibed' 30 years ago, I'm betting they'd not even REMEMBER, ha! (Sorry!)

~ Anne ~

ps: HOPE YOUR STUFF IS GOING GREAT, MAN!!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
SoTexMike's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the reply Anne. I actually got started on my search through TT's "apply here" tab. I initially latched onto the company that reached out to me the fastest and met my initial criteria (which was pretty thin when I started this journey a month ago). I have learned a lot since then hence my refined needs and wants.

The application for my physical asked if I had EVER failed a drug test and I was "rewarded" for answering truthfully. If I had the money I would take a new physical just to change my answer confused.gif LOL.

I have started a fresh list as of this evening with many of the companies you have listed so maybe I am headed in the right direction

My avatar picture is the best looking one of me I could find. Glad you like it! Cheers!

SoTexMike's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Would a failed post employment drug test from 30 years ago still be on your record? I have no clue, I am honestly asking. If it wouldn't be then don't admit it to any employer. Not even the docs doing your physical. Only admit to what they will eventually find out by searching so you don't waste your time or theirs.

Most, if not all, the drivers on here will recommend that you start with a larger carrier. If your not looking to drive regional or OTR then hopefully someone on here will have info for you about companies in the Texas area.

Good luck with the permit test tomorrow ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿผ

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I voluteered the info. I dont even know why i did. not like they could have verified it but I guess it was my naievite on display. I honestly thought it wouldnt make a difference. I am definitely looking to drive OTR/regional but i have heard companies with terminals near home make life easier to get home when necessary. thanks for the reply

Cheers

double-quotes-end.png

Haya, Mike.

A guy named Scott (who hasn't been back to report the 'retort') posted on a similar situation, a small while ago.

Stevens and Scott's Conundrum: Stevens Send Home Thread >>

Seriously, this is NUTS. I've got NO reply, but pretty sure my trucker wasn't ever 'asked' to report what he 'did' 20 or 30 years ago; and cannabis would be the worst. No DUI's, no 'hard stuff.'

Did you read the question, ACCURATELY???? Did it say 'EVER?'

You should REALLY 'apply here:' >>Apply For Paid CDL Training

Also, 'nearby' training: Knight, PAM, Stevens (shhhhh!!,) McLane (I recommend!,) and Raider Express. All training companies, with terminals in Texas. Last two are BASED in TX, I believe.

So many mods and veterans on here will QUANTIFY that a terminal near home has LITTLE TO NO impact, on home time. I can tell you stories, but... Just won't....for now. Look at Big Scott, for instance. He lives in NC, and is in Joplin, now .. for company stuff, at the 'main' (I believe) terminal. He gets home/goes home ALL THE TIME he WANTS!

I'll be thinking of more; as I can. I like your avatar but rather >>! Just be YOU.

~ Anne ~

Yeah Anne, I have been following this thread and it has been in the back of my head this entire time. Sheesh, at least I was at home when I got my gut punch.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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