Schneider National Kept My Employment Record For Over 10 Yrs

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Chris P.'s Comment
member avatar

....says the guy sitting home, smoking weed, trying to get the government to pay for his training using the tax money collected from the hard-working people he's criticizing here in this forum:

Trying pot in a legal state 8 months ago does not a pot head make. I didn't like it either. However, I do like beer, but I accept that I'll have to sacrifice my beer usage to be a company driver. Characterizing me as a guy sitting around smoking weed is fallacious.

As far as taxes go, I don't think middle class should be taxed more. I actually think they should be taxed less, but I'd definitely go after billionaires. My viewpoint is we are all in a society together, and we all rely on one another. Right now I'm not pulling my weight, and I accept that that's not fair to the hard workers out there, but hopefully it will change.

David S.'s Comment
member avatar

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Are you seriously considering a lawsuit for something YOU did wrong? No, you can't sue them for keeping track of who they have employed over the years. What would be the grounds? Too good a memory? Lmao and smh.

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I asked the question about a lawsuit because I was under the impression that there's a statue of limitations on the time a company can keep any records of an employee ive read 7 years is the longest records can be kept by an employer secondly I held a job for 11 yrs after I left schneider for being so called unsafe I never had a accident or was late delivering while I worked for schneider my termination was bs in my opinion and again that was 12 years ago how can u hold someone to something that happened 12 years ago in the work field I dont feel that is right there's plenty of companies out here so im not worried I was just curious abt them being able to keep my record on file for over decade. Lastly like I said a recruiter from schneider prior told me I was eligible to rehire when I applied back in 2018 she said I had passed the time frame and was eligible for rehire when I applied this time initially the recruiter told me I was eligible for rehire that at the end of the interview that all changed how why its bs schneider to damn strict anyways I know its something out here better for me.. .

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Trucking companies must maintain employment records for at least 10 years. This is required by FMCSA bylaws.

You are confusing credit history with employment records. Anything older than 7 years falls off your credit history. Companies can keep records of employment for as long as they want. Some industries, like trucking, have oversight bodies that require employment records be maintained for a certain length of time. There is absolutely nothing that is harming anyone by maintaining employment records indefinitely.

No I was talking about credit history im speaking on employment record keeping. I Googled also thats where I got the statue of limitations on record keeping from from the eeoc fair labor act they say only 3 years others say 7 years and even the dot says up to 10 years I haven't worked for Schneider for over 12 years so again im kinda appalled that they are still holding on to my information past the deadline but it doesn't matter they've shown me twice now why I shouldn't even consider them for employment plus they are very strict so I will find employment elsewhere its no big deal but in my research there are guidelines and deadlines to how long a company has to keep your records payroll raises conduct etc and at the max I see 7 or 10 years again im beyond the 10 year mark hell I was 21 when I started driving for Schneider im in my early 30's now no one should be held to something that happened 12 years ago in the work field especially when I was falsely accused and terminated from the jump

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

This has become quite a saga. David, are you the one who wants to see a lawyer? And Chris is the apologist? You guys are your own worst enemies so maybe you should hire a lawyer and sue yourselves.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

David S., you continually harp on all the research you've done that says max 7 or max 10 years. I've looked and see absolutely nothing that states any kind of maximum time lengths or statute of limitations on work record disposals. POST YOUR SOURCES.

Chris P.'s Comment
member avatar

Bruce,

I don't think David should sue. I think he's just frustrated, and I can relate to the frustration in all sorts of ways.

Kerry L.'s Comment
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Are you seriously considering a lawsuit for something YOU did wrong? No, you can't sue them for keeping track of who they have employed over the years. What would be the grounds? Too good a memory? Lmao and smh.

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No I was talking about credit history im speaking on employment record keeping. I Googled also thats where I got the statue of limitations on record keeping from from the eeoc fair labor act they say only 3 years others say 7 years and even the dot says up to 10 years I haven't worked for Schneider for over 12 years so again im kinda appalled that they are still holding on to my information past the deadline but it doesn't matter they've shown me twice now why I shouldn't even consider them for employment plus they are very strict so I will find employment elsewhere its no big deal but in my research there are guidelines and deadlines to how long a company has to keep your records payroll raises conduct etc and at the max I see 7 or 10 years again im beyond the 10 year mark hell I was 21 when I started driving for Schneider im in my early 30's now no one should be held to something that happened 12 years ago in the work field especially when I was falsely accused and terminated from the jump

First thing, by law, trucking companies have to keep employment records of drivers for A MINIMUM of 10 years, not UP TO 10 years. That means there is nothing wrong with keeping your record for 12 years, ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU ARE APPLYING TO WORK FOR THEM AGAIN. You really thought that you would be able to apply with Schneider National, as if you had never worked for them before?

As it pertains to a company maintaining a record, under FLSA, employment records must be maintained for a minimum of 3 years.

Here is a link that I referenced:

https://www.eeoc.gov/employers/recordkeeping-requirements

You have the whole thing twisted around. Companies have a minimum amount of time they are required to maintain records so that former employees have proof of employment going back that length of time. There is absolutely no maximum amount of time that companies can legally maintain employment records. You said something about "statue(sic) of limitations," but that's complete misapplication of the term. You also mentioned that you are not that worried about this company that there are plenty of others. Come on, dude. You posted a comment talking about a lawsuit due to discrimination. You are most definitely worried about Schneider National. If you weren't, you wouldn't have posted a comment asking about the possibility of getting even for doing you wrong. (That's what a lawsuit is.) It's not just the initial post; you doubled-down after numerous people told you that you have your information all screwed up.

Now, since you said that there are plenty of other companies, here is my suggestion:

Start another thread expressing interest in re-entering the trucking industry. Let that thread be fresh and free of any harbored resentment toward any former employer. Be genuine and ready to accept advice and there are plenty of experienced drivers here who will point you in different directions that have all worked for many drivers.

I would suggest starting here:

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Good luck to you and keep TT posted on your new trucking adventure.

~Kerry

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Why doesn't your pride also come with an desire to not be exploited? Don't you have enough pride in what you do not to get used hard and fed little?

Chris, that's a fair question. Probably misguided, but I am going to give you credit for asking a fair question.

Tell us how you know or define when you are being exploited. Is there a magic number? You mentioned earlier about working really tough jobs where you made less than 30 grand. So, if those jobs paid 40 grand would you feel you were being treated fairly, or would you still feel exploited?

I think you could help us out by clarifying some of your remarks or feelings about not being paid a fair wage. There must be a number somewhere that makes you feel like you are being treated right. Can you share it with us? How do you come up with that number? How often do you up the ante and decide, "Wait a minute, that number is no longer acceptable."

Here's a true story...

I started my trucking career at 27 cents per mile. That is a number that would be laughed at today, yet that was only about nine years ago. I was in a group of about fifty people that started at that company in an orientation class together. After a year of busting my tail I found out there was only one other person from that orientation class that had stayed the course with me for our rookie year. I made fifty thousand dollars that year, and I was damn proud of the job I had done. I don't know why the other 48 people quit, but I am certain a lot of them felt they were being exploited.

You see, trucking has some strange effects on people. Most newbies think this job is way too stressful for the pay they make. I never felt that way. I always focused on learning how to be better at it. I never once felt exploited. I felt like I had a lot to learn, and I did my best everyday to learn how to be proficient at the job. If you are inefficient at a performance-based job you will feel exploited. That's because you will be expending effort that doesn't result in good returns. That is defined as inefficiency, not exploitation. Every rookie truck driver suffers from it, but many of them blame it on the company abusing them, or exploitation as you refer to it. You must recognize the real problem if you ever want to fix it. Blaming our poor performance on exploitation is a cop out. It happens daily in the trucking world. Get in line and be ready to join the throngs of folks who feel that way.

People are bad about underestimating trucking. You are doing it all the time. You gave me a good chuckle when you tried to tell us how dangerous cutting Christmas trees with a chainsaw was. It shows us just how juvenile your understanding is about trucking. There is nothing wrong with that and I am not even trying to be critical. To be honest I am trying to help you understand the career. I don't feel I am wasting my time with you. I am hoping you might learn something in here. Whether you do or not will be up to you. We try and we have been known to fail, but it is fun teaching you because there are so many other folks who are listening and gaining knowledge from our discussions with you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Andrey's Comment
member avatar

It is much simpler: nobody can tell a private company to not keep records after a certain amount of years. If a company wants, it can keep it forever. And let us not forget, that again, as a private company, it can reject anyone for any reason (if the reason is legally not a good one, they will come up with something better).

Chris P.'s Comment
member avatar

Tell us how you know or define when you are being exploited. Is there a magic number? You mentioned earlier about working really tough jobs where you made less than 30 grand. So, if those jobs paid 40 grand would you feel you were being treated fairly, or would you still feel exploited?

It depends on a lot of factors. For example, the job I got when I ran out of money in the middle of attending that second trucking school? It was sorting trash for recycling on conveyor belts. It actually ranks as being more dangerous than truck driving. I didn't feel exploited there because, even though I only made $15/hr, I wasn't creating a whole lot of value. I was fairly paid, and it was just a terrible job to have. I got sick of all the all the exposure to used needles I was getting, and I didn't get the boots I was promised, so I quit. The people working there were mostly a mix of felons and immigrant workers. They just didn't have anything better they could manage.

Then there was building electronics for the airforce. I was creating thousands of dollars of value daily and getting paid $9.50/hr. I was absurdly exploited. I was the guy fixing engineer's documentation, babysitting the workers that couldn't really handle the job, getting blamed for their mistakes, etc. I kind of miss that job because it actually made good use of me, but I was mad and vocal about it everyday. They didn't fire me because I made up for it with the job I was doing. The reason I never got paid better? The CEO invited me to their clubhouse early on, and I refused to go.

When it comes to truck driving... it depends on a lot of factors, but if I can make 80k/year once I'm competent, I'll be happy. I'm not scared of hard work. I didn't fail at the DMV because I wasn't willing to put in the hours. I wasn't give the hours. I practically begged for me time behind the wheel. It might also be the case that I'm just not capable of being a good truck driver, which means I'll have to suck it up and find something else to do. I have no confidence in my ability to navigate flawlessly. I note instances while driving around in my car where I'd be in a lot of trouble if I was driving a big rig.

People are bad about underestimating trucking. You are doing it all the time. You gave me a good chuckle when you tried to tell us how dangerous cutting Christmas trees with a chainsaw was. It shows us just how juvenile your understanding is about trucking. There is nothing wrong with that and I am not even trying to be critical. To be honest I am trying to help you understand the career. I don't feel I am wasting my time with you. I am hoping you might learn something in here. Whether you do or not will be up to you. We try and we have been known to fail, but it is fun teaching you because there are so many other folks who are listening and gaining knowledge from our discussions with you.

Perhaps you're underestimating how dangerous it is to be running chainsaws on the sides of mountains, often times up a ladder, in the middle of snow storms. We'd navigate on snow mobiles, and trees that fell across rivers were "bridges". It was my favorite job. I didn't even have to be paid to do that one. It was a great adventure. :)

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
if I can make 80k/year once I'm competent, I'll be happy.

What if it takes you four or five years to get competent? Will that 80K still be sounding good?

What if you find out the revenues you are producing for the company far exceed the 80K you are getting paid? Are you going to feel you are creating excessive value but not being rewarded well enough?

80K is possible, but it is also way high when you look at the average truck driver pay. You will have to really be good to hit those kind of numbers. There are plenty of drivers here who make that kind of money, I hope you can learn a few things from them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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