Knight Transportation, Flatbed

Topic 31116 | Page 10

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TwoSides11's Comment
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Thank you John, Davy, Anne, Matt, G-town!

Davy, thanks for that advice. I usually stop when the drives get up to the trailer then look out the mirror to judge the height but for now on I will just get out and look. Better to be sure than to have a high hook or have the trailer fall. Plus I'm already outside lifting the landing gear, I should have already been checking the locking jaws. I've been lucky so far with that....

Also I don't know if I have to do 30k solo miles training with flatbed, I will definitely ask. They just told me I would shadow a driver for a week...

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

It's WEDNESDAY!

CONGRATS, Good sir, waiting to hear!!!

Best to ya!

~ Anne ~

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TwoSides11's Comment
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Yes Anne today is Wednesday, the truck they assigned to me needs service brakes that's been on back order for a week and a half. I'm at the terminal waiting to get this loaner fixed. Battery is dead and the transmission light is on...

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

0384788001640195150.jpg

This will be my truck once up and running. Has 348k miles on it. If I don't go out driving in the loaner truck I will spend the day here cleaning the inside of the cab. It's filthy

Old School's Comment
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Hey TwoSides11, you won't be doing another 30,000 miles with flatbed. You will just spend about a week following another driver just to get a feel for how things work at Cressona, and to learn a little about securement. Knight's flatbed training has never seemed sufficient to me, but they should give you a little J.J. Keller book on load securement. READ IT - STUDY IT. There is a lot of valuable information there. If you don't get that book, ask your DM or even Howard about it. You need to learn the information in that book. If for some reason they don't get one for you, I will personally give you a copy when I can.

I have made a note of your truck number. Mine is 522828 (red Volvo). We will come across one another soon enough. I used to be in Cressona almost on a weekly basis. That has changed and I am not sure how often I will be there, but I will definitely be there often.

You did a fine job with your training. It is never easy, and yours had extra difficulties that you handled as best you could. Congratulations! Now you get to test yourself in the real world. Do your best, and please ask us for help or advice if you feel you need it. Remember this whole first year is a time of learning. Everyday will expose you to new experiences. Keep learning and keep churning. This is a career that takes a great deal of commitment. You appear to have what it takes, and I hope you can continue to enjoy success!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
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Awesome! Merry Christmas indeed!

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TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Thanks PackRat, thanks Old School.

Yes I made it through training! I do feel that I should have been taught more but I guess that will come with time. Feeling a tad bit unprepared as well. I believe to have the driving part down but it feels like I'm missing something. I definitely will not hesitate to ask questions either, I know for sure I will need extra help and advice.

Knights squire training was very laid back. I did more research learning on my own than being taught what to do. I still did enjoy the time I was out on the road. Brad my 2nd trainer was a big help though, it's a shame they are losing a great driving trainer to the classroom. But I know he will make a difference in the training department. Compared to other diaries I've read, this terminals training program is lacking big time. I can't say Knight as a whole, I can only speak for this terminal. The positive to that is they are aware and actively trying to change that.

The office here is very unorganized which is concerning. There is a obvious lack of communication within the terminal. Today was suppose to be my first day going solo. A quick run to Ohio and back but there were no trucks available. The truck I was assigned to needs brakes and the part has been on back order for over a week. When I talked to the mechanic he was confused that they sent me to get the truck. It's in the system as being out of service and noone in the office checked to see if it was operational. My DM and terminal manager then gave me 3 truck numbers to check out. All of them were also out of service and in the system as such. A quick look on the computer and they would have seen that.

So today was a waste, I came to the terminal just to wait in the lounge all day. I did get to meet with some of the techs though and they were cool. They gave me more knowledge on how the truck operates and what to do to keep it out of the shop lol. I'm also going to ask for breakdown pay for today. Right now I'm at a hotel they set up for me waiting to see what will happen tomorrow. The only truck close to being ready is having transmission problems, we will see how that plays out....

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Okay, here's my advice after being a driver out of that same terminal. Call the shop each day instead of driving there only to hang out in the lounge all day. Your experience now sounds much like my experience from three years previous.

When I was there, each time my truck went into the shop for only scheduled maintenance (PM grease job or oil change), it was a guaranteed 34 hour reset. It doesn't read like much has changed.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, I might add, politely ask your dm for layover/breakdown pay. This could also be an opportunity to get a bit fresher truck. If the LT works for you, all good, but it never hurts to ask if there is another truck available. The magic words are to volunteer to do a recovery. (Recovering a truck from elsewhere for them) I've done several. That's how I got Edna she only had 147k. And the KWs are hard to get here.

If you're willing to go drive to get the truck, they can get you a rental car, you can load your stuff into and they will reimburse gas and hotel if needed.

It may not be worth the time and energy though, up to you.

Definitely want to hear about your experience as you start flatbedding I'm strongly considering doing it after I complete a year dry van.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Okay, here's my advice after being a driver out of that same terminal. Call the shop each day instead of driving there only to hang out in the lounge all day. Your experience now sounds much like my experience from three years previous.

When I was there, each time my truck went into the shop for only scheduled maintenance (PM grease job or oil change), it was a guaranteed 34 hour reset. It doesn't read like much has changed.

Appreciate the advice PackRat. It's discouraging to hear 3yrs ago you experienced the same thing I'm experiencing with this terminal. Although that is the number 1 complaint from all the drivers I spoke with. If your truck goes into the shop, just go get a hotel or go home if your close... Grab a snickers, it's going to be a while....

Davy, I wish I read what you wrote about doing a recovery before I went into the terminal today. I did ask if there were any other trucks elsewhere but they told me they didn't know. My truck still wasn't ready and no loaners available. The International I took the test in had 82k on it and was in great shape but was already given to another driver. They are going to take the brakes off another truck and put them on mine so I can get rolling on Monday.

I will receive breakdown pay for today and yesterday. Tomorrow I will spend time cleaning out the truck and will also get paid for that. Going home for the weekend, it wasn't a total waste coming up. I got to see my truck, met the techs and am able to clean the truck because the lady that usually does it is on vacation.

I will be making another thread of my first yr experience with flatbed and hopefully it will be beneficial to someone. I feel like this diary was mostly about my bad trainer than having actual driving tips to help someone new...

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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