Do Some Truck Drivers Really Only Make $10/hr?

Topic 31121 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Chris P.'s Comment
member avatar

I stumbled on this article a few minutes ago. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/nov/22/indentured-servitude-low-pay-and-grueling-conditions-fueling-us-truck-driver-shortage

“If you can work construction and get paid $20 an hour and be home every night, why would you drive a truck and get paid $10 an hour to not be home for weeks?”

Do some truck drivers really only make $10/hr?

Trucker Chris (CK)'s Comment
member avatar

I stumbled on this article a few minutes ago. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/nov/22/indentured-servitude-low-pay-and-grueling-conditions-fueling-us-truck-driver-shortage

double-quotes-start.png

“If you can work construction and get paid $20 an hour and be home every night, why would you drive a truck and get paid $10 an hour to not be home for weeks?”

double-quotes-end.png

Do some truck drivers really only make $10/hr?

I don't think he was being literal. If you're making $10 an hour as a Class A driver, you're working for the wrong company.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I stumbled on this article a few minutes ago. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/nov/22/indentured-servitude-low-pay-and-grueling-conditions-fueling-us-truck-driver-shortage

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

“If you can work construction and get paid $20 an hour and be home every night, why would you drive a truck and get paid $10 an hour to not be home for weeks?”

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Do some truck drivers really only make $10/hr?

double-quotes-end.png

I don't think he was being literal. If you're making $10 an hour as a Class A driver, you're working for the wrong company.

I would imagine the comparison is being based on running your full 70 plus adding in additional time waiting at a dock while awake etc. If one takes all of that into account and break it down, hourly pay as a new driver can look pretty ugly lol

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

No, truck drivers don't make $10 an hour. Those who are paid hourly normally make $20+ with $30 being not so uncommon. And for those who are paid for miles, time doesn't make sense: when I drive for one hour on an free interstate at 70 mph I make $49, but when I sit at a dock, for an hour, I make $0. Thrtefore you have to go by weeks or months, although it is hard to calculate hours. Is it driving time? Or any on duty time? And if we talk about on duty, oftentime it means relaxing in a bunk and watching a movie while other people load or unload your trailer - not what you normally do in a construction business :-)

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gregg M.'s Comment
member avatar

I hear this type of thing pretty often. The problem is people want to compare different jobs/careers in some standard way and assume that “hourly rate” is a fair comparison. It is not. There are also people (often those writing articles) who have an agenda and find that using artificial “hourly rates” somehow bolsters their viewpoint. The truth is many careers can’t be defined by the standard 9 to 5 get paid by the hour concept. I work as an automotive technician - working on the flat rate system, which is basically piecework. I have an hourly rate, but in truth it is almost meaningless because my ability to bill time is predicated on many variables, so my paycheck varies week to week. In addition some days I work 8 hours, sometimes I’ll stay late, and now and then I leave early or arrive late. So my “effective rate” is all over the place, but usually significantly more than my documented “hourly rate”. I also tow part time, again being paid based on what I bill. I’m on call overnight. But some nights I’m home at 5 for dinner, others I run til midnight (or later). How would you calculate an hourly rate for that - by the time I’m in the truck, or on duty, or just loaded . .? Truck driving as a career segment has so many variations in what you do and how you get paid it can be difficult to compare jobs. One thing for sure is you have to find the place that fits what you want to do as a driver, and what you need financially. You can make generalizations, but there are always exceptions, good and bad. Is OTR a good paycheck - yes. Is it a good hourly rate . . welllllll . . . probably not. But you don’t drive OTR to brag about your hourly rate, you drive OTR because you love the job, something an hourly rate can never quantify.

Gregg

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

If, as a driver, you are only making $10/hr, you are working for the wrong company.... either your not being given loads that keeping you moving, your refusing loads, or your not hustling... Even on my slowest week running regional , I averaged $15/hr, and when I was on my dedicated accounts, the lowest I made was an average of $20/hour, and my highest was over $25/hour ($1100 for 42 hours)...

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More