Starting Over

Topic 31151 | Page 1

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Babyhog's Comment
member avatar

I've been out of trucking since 2005,my license has recently been renewed, but I'm having a problem of where to begin to get my experience regained, I would like to drive for a LTL carrier or Reefer carrier, what's the pay like today, can I get enough money to pay a mortgage or a car note in this industry today?

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

Renewed? You will most likely have to start a training program as if you never had a cdl. I would strongly suggest company sponsored training. Paid CDL Training Programs

The best information for getting into the industry is here on trucking truth. Browse, ask questions via forums. Good luck. My opinion I would look at Millis Transfer, Knight, Prime, or Swift. Once thru training run hard, show dispatch you are serious about running the miles, etc you should be able to make 50-60k in your first year. I am sure others will chime in. Good people on here. They will be blunt, to the point, and very helpful in getting started or re-started in the trucking industry.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I've been out of trucking since 2005,my license has recently been renewed, but I'm having a problem of where to begin to get my experience regained, I would like to drive for a LTL carrier or Reefer carrier, what's the pay like today, can I get enough money to pay a mortgage or a car note in this industry today?

Howdy !!

I'm not sure 'where' you are in IL . . . being '20 yrs' in Ohio myself. Bobcat Bob drives for Old Dominion somewhere in IL, however! He will show up, hopefully . . . to clarify. In the meantime, you can look him up by that; his user name.

My guy drives for FAB Express in Joliet/Lemont vicinity . . . no city deliveries, but a Mack Pinnacle with a 53' dry van; boxes literally! International Paper is their main account. Sorry, no reefers...(why IS that your choice?)

You're literally in a great area to pick back up, good sir ! Best wishes;

~ Anne ~

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

As advertised, you'll need to be retrained. The good news is that LTL companies are now offering FREE training, many with union pay scales and benefits. Yes, there was a time you had to go OTR for a year for free training, there was also a time when you had to hitch a mule team to a wagon also but today you can go from trainee to Linehaul Driver in just 60 days. You may only make $60k your first year on the extra board, but you will work your way up the seniority food chain the longer you are there and make more every year. $100k+ in five years is realistic. Here are some excellent opportunities near you:

ABF Freight Driver Development Program - Road $5,000 signing bonus paid on DAY ONE! Teamster pay scale.

XPO Truck Driver Student Pays $19.56/hr. while you train, reach top of scale after just 3 years.

YRC Linehaul Driver CDL Academy Pays $17.50/hr. while you train, Teamster scale after.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I live in Joliet and work for OD, I see your are in Sauk Village which is great as Pearl mentioned ABF and YRC have huge terminals there.

My dad is looking into working for ABF he had a CDL but let it expire they said they will train him at $16 a hour then put him on the extra board. They are offering a 5k sign on bonus if you apply by the end of the year I think it was.

You should have no problem hitting 100k in a few years doing linehaul for any of the major LTL. If you want to do P&D you will probably be in the 70 to 80k range.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been out of trucking since 2005,my license has recently been renewed, but I'm having a problem of where to begin to get my experience regained, I would like to drive for a LTL carrier or Reefer carrier, what's the pay like today, can I get enough money to pay a mortgage or a car note in this industry today?

To add to what has already been stated, starting February 1st, FMCSA is going to require new CDL holders to complete a certified training program before being able to obtain a license. You may want to familiarize yourself with the new regulation on that, in case you had it in mind to obtain your license again without going through a school.

There are plenty of options for someone to obtain a license and even be paid during that time of training.

I just started orientation with a company -- Dutch Maid Logistics -- and learned today that some time around the beginning of the year, they will be starting their own school. I don't know any of the particulars of whether it will be paid training, how many hours it will be, etc. This is a refrigerated company that runs the east coast, mostly, but they do hire out of other areas, myself living in Texas. Most of the loads are 300-500 mile loads to be delivered in a day. They have the freight to keep drivers running, or that is what has been told so far. I have no reason to doubt that at all. They describe themselves as a training company, but also identify themselves as a company where drivers can stay to retire.

Good luck on your search.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Don's Comment
member avatar

Did you say "no city deliveries"? Do Tom and I work for the same Fab Express? 😄

double-quotes-start.png

I've been out of trucking since 2005,my license has recently been renewed, but I'm having a problem of where to begin to get my experience regained, I would like to drive for a LTL carrier or Reefer carrier, what's the pay like today, can I get enough money to pay a mortgage or a car note in this industry today?

double-quotes-end.png

Howdy !!

I'm not sure 'where' you are in IL . . . being '20 yrs' in Ohio myself. Bobcat Bob drives for Old Dominion somewhere in IL, however! He will show up, hopefully . . . to clarify. In the meantime, you can look him up by that; his user name.

My guy drives for FAB Express in Joliet/Lemont vicinity . . . no city deliveries, but a Mack Pinnacle with a 53' dry van; boxes literally! International Paper is their main account. Sorry, no reefers...(why IS that your choice?)

You're literally in a great area to pick back up, good sir ! Best wishes;

~ Anne ~

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Did you say "no city deliveries"? Do Tom and I work for the same Fab Express? 😄

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I've been out of trucking since 2005,my license has recently been renewed, but I'm having a problem of where to begin to get my experience regained, I would like to drive for a LTL carrier or Reefer carrier, what's the pay like today, can I get enough money to pay a mortgage or a car note in this industry today?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Howdy !!

I'm not sure 'where' you are in IL . . . being '20 yrs' in Ohio myself. Bobcat Bob drives for Old Dominion somewhere in IL, however! He will show up, hopefully . . . to clarify. In the meantime, you can look him up by that; his user name.

My guy drives for FAB Express in Joliet/Lemont vicinity . . . no city deliveries, but a Mack Pinnacle with a 53' dry van; boxes literally! International Paper is their main account. Sorry, no reefers...(why IS that your choice?)

You're literally in a great area to pick back up, good sir ! Best wishes;

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-end.png

People in Chi'town KNOW cities, Don!!!

Napoleon, Willard, Fremont, Reynoldsburg, & Vandalia hardly qualify, haha~!!!!! Bet you took OFF the pre Turkey week; Tom was straight running to Wooster for empties, and .... Campbells, Smuckers, Pep, and Chewy loads. Guess he filled in for ya, LoL! A few Vic's Secret, too.. he always gets 'hopeful' when that one shows up, haha~!!! Must be a guy thing, LoL.

~ Anne ~

ps: Re, cities .. this: (They must give YOU all the CLE runs, then. . . . have AT IT!)

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

David M.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m in the same boat. I tried OTR back in 1994, when I was 23 years old, and I’m now considering re-entering the trucking industry. I only lasted about 3 months back then. The company I drove for had me start pulling double 27’ trailers with that little experience. I watched my trainer go around this curve at 55 MPH multiple times, even though the posted advisory speed was 45 MPH. And he did it with doubles. I did the same thing when I was running solo, and the back trailer rolled. Until then, things had been going fine. I freaked out and quit. I haven’t driven a truck since. I saw that companies like YRC are now offering CDL training and I thought it sounded pretty good. Being a regional driver and not having to unload or deal with waiting to be unloaded would be awesome. Then I saw some indeed reviews for YRC and guys mentioned having to work on the dock and also having to be on call. If that’s the case then I certainly don’t want to deal with that. And it also sounds like they run doubles and triples right away. I don’t know what to think at this point. It also doesn’t seem like the overall driver pay has changed much since way back then.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

..... Then I saw some indeed reviews for YRC and guys mentioned having to work on the dock and also having to be on call. If that’s the case then I certainly don’t want to deal with that.

Trucking in general and LTL in particular has always been about seniority - more time gets you better jobs and better paychecks. Traditionally, all LTL drivers would start by working the dock. After a few years of working the dock they would be able to bid into a P&D position. After several years of driving P&D they would be able to bid on a Linehaul position. In a few places it's still like that. In Houston the LTL companies don't hire drivers (but they do require a CDL for a job on their docks).

In LTL, drivers start out working the, 'extra board'. They don't have a regular run, they just fill in when more experienced drivers take vacation or call in sick. After a few years on the extra board they can bid on a regular run or just keep working the extra board. Again it's about seniority. A driver with a few years of experience will get choose the run he wants to take before less senior drivers get what's left.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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