Dutch Maid Logistics -- Orientation/Training

Topic 31154 | Page 5

Page 5 of 10 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

He is teaching you, you just aren't aware of it. Stop and think for a minute. This gent has been driving a long time, he's obviously been employed and knows how to get where he needs to go.

He's making you look at different routes, making you think more. As Kersey said, he probably had vey good reasons for taking you down more complicated routes, in fact what better Time to go through tough places than with your trainer on board.

What I don't know is, are you asking questions? I would have been asking how every device on the truck works, how to negotiate hills, weather, road conditions. What's the history of the Jake, why does it work? When should I not use it?

My trainer didn't volunteer information, I got it because I politely asked....all day and night. Your trainer has been doing this longer than you have. Are you watching him when he drives? How's he negotiating things? How does he use the controls, where's he look when he's backing, does he use reference points in turns, ask.

And on the eating thing...are you wanting to do a regular sit down breakfast every morning? I'd say no, and hell no. This is a job, not a vacation. That would burn up way too much clock. A quick healthy breakfast, and time to work.

Davy, he hasn't really been driving all that long. About 18 months, total. That is much longer than I since I have not driven at all solo. He really isn't doing it that well because he has had a couple of incidents and he has had issues with getting to pickups and deliveries on time.

I ask questions constantly. We have excellent dialogue while driving. He will tell me what he expects and if I don't understand, I ask him to explain it again. I ask him questions about what to do in various scenarios, how to operate anything and everything. Sometimes he won't give a straight answer because he has picked up that I will typically figure it out on my own. That's sort of his approach and I really appreciate it because it gets me out of the comfort zine of always having a trainer there. Real soon, I will be the only one in the truck, and I will have to be my best resource. My trainer drove the first day because I didn't have a login yet for the ELD. After that I have basically driven until the load is delivered or I am out of hours. When my trainer has had to drive, I am in the seat watching him and asking questions. The only exception to this was one time after I had driven out my hours and had been sitting next to him for a while. He told me to go ahead and get some sleep.

As far as eating, I am talking about stopping to get food and bring it back to the truck. Definitely not sitting down to eat. Grab it and go. He keeps food in the truck and he has told me that any food he has I can eat. I am most appreciative of this (and tell him) because he has no obligation to do this. Sometimes I want to be able to get a Subway sandwich to eat on my 30-minute break. That type of thing. Since the issue came up the other day and he has realized that I am more than willing to work my desire to get food around fueling and bathroom breaks, it has been much better. I would say 0 issues now.

I totally agree with you in everything that you said. I wish that you guys could see my trainer and I at work. We would actually make a pretty good team because our strengths and weaknesses kind of compliment each other. I just need more experience to expose me to more situations from which to learn. All is coming with time.

Anyway, my whole gripe with my trainer (still a very good one all around) is that I don't think it's good for a trainer to be so heavily dependent upon a GPS and to have that completely lost look on his face when he doesn't know how to get to the truck entrance of a shipper/receiver. I really felt bad for him that he really didn't know what to do when he arrived at an address and the sign said to enter from another street. I heard the panic in his voice and saw the look on his face that is not the look of a trainer who knows what he is doing and is confidently showing his trainee how to be a professional. I am an encourager, so I did my job as a Dutch Maid Logistics employee and enabled my trainer to feel like we got the job done together. I cracked a joke about having to drive around, but I put the joke on me not getting directions right.

Ultimately, I am an employee the same as he and I want to get the job done. First, the job is to get me drive time in all sorts of situations, and learning all aspects of operating the truck plus the paperwork that goes with picking up loads and delivering them. Second, the job is to pick up and deliver on time. I acknowledge that which of those goes first and which goes second will vary depending on who is asked. In every job I have had, I am a team-player and this job is no different. I am doing everything to be a coachable and teachable trainee. My trainer is doing everything to be a solid trainer. We are both human, so there will be mistakes on both sides. I recognize that I probably went about voicing my criticisms about my trainer in ways that don't look favorably on me. I accept this reality and this is why I haven't pushed back on the comments made that are critical of me in this thread.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Kerry, I was over on I-84 in Connecticut at a TA last Monday. There really are no truck stops on that road lol. There are barely any in that region period. Got my first taste of snow driving that day also.

What trucker GPS are you using on your phone? I think that might come in handy. Glad to hear your out on the road getting miles in. Drive safe.

That Monday, I was in Willard, OH. Yeah, I had to learn the hard way that once you get into NE, fueling options and truck stops in general become extremely sparse. I loved driving up there because every state in which I have driven has been the first time I have been in that state. I use an app called Hammer.

Thank you so much and I definitely stay safe. You also stay safe out there. Oh, close to 40 hours driven so far. I am hitting 9+ hours every day now. I will probably get close to that again tomorrow and then back at the Willard terminal. My trainer is going home on Thursday, so he will have a load going to Maryland. I am hoping to catch something heading down toward Dallas.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Years ago another driver.... (Hmm hmm you know who you are lol) called me saying "My trainer sucks, he is late had an accident and.never plans anything."

I said... "Uh huh. Uh huh.. What have your learned?"

He replied "nothing in just told you how bad he is. Should I get a new trainer?"

I said "you learned to GOAL when backing or you will hit something... You learned to arrive early... And you learned to fill out and accident report and best part os that it wasnt yours."

You can learn from the mistakes of others.

As for "what would he have done if I wasnt there?"

Guess what... He has been driving longer than you have been on the truck. It probably happens often.... He would have figured it out. You being there made it more convenient. Learn from his mistakes instead of constantly griping about how you know.more than him. I guarantee you in a couple months you will be posting about how being solo is so much harder than you thought.

Several of my students told me "you made it looked so easy!"

Good luck

Hey Rainey, please understand that I recognize that I am learning a hell of a lot from my trainer. What he isn't teaching me, he is allowing me to see that I have the resources to figure it out myself. I like the fact that he is having me do everything so that once I am solo, I am not lost like I haven't done it myself before. He really treats me driving like he is just there to prevent any huge mistakes. I like it this way. His necessary criticisms are growing further apart and less intense, and his compliments are growing closer together and more expressive.

I just don't understand how a trainer can be tasked with training who doesn't understand how recaps work and doesn't understand how to do a complete trip plan.

You are absolutely right that I am going to have those "oh s**t" moments when I realize that things were a bit was easier when in the truck with a trainer. Hopefully nothing serious happens, but I have no doubt that the learning curve will come with moments that are difficult to handle. This is not an easy industry and it is not forgiving.

Thank you for the perspective that you bring. Your comments are always appreciated.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Spent the night at Cabela's in Scarborough, Maine. I set my alarm to wake up early and trainer was already out of the truck and probably enjoying Cabela's. I took a walk down to Dunkin' Donuts to get a breakfast sandwich and coffee. Dunkin' Donuts at this location was drive-thru only. Thankfully it was attached to a gas station. I settled for a cheeseburger and an energy drink. The cheeseburger was demolished on the walk back to the truck. Energy drink enjoyed inside the warm confines of the truck.

Conducted trip plan, then chit-chatted with trainer. Once 10-hour break was complete, pre-trip was performed. Then it was on the road. Drove From Scarborough, Maine to Wareham, Mass. via I-95 to I-93 straight through the heart of Boston. I very much enjoyed the experience of driving through the tunnel in Boston. It was a great experience. Arrived at the shipper in Wareham, Mass and got loaded. Drove from there to rest area off I-80 near Loganton, PA. Drove I-195 to I-95 to I-287 to I-80. 11 hours driven, all miles driven by trainee. Total drive hours completed: 40+.

Thanks to all who are offering feedback and asking questions.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'm by no means a driver, yet.. (one day) but I personally think that your trainer may actually be doing a good job, it seems to me like it's kind of like a reverse training. He may want to see what you know and understand, and if you can utilize said understanding and knowledge in real world situations, and is effectively playing dumb so you "teach" him. At least that's my understanding from what you have posted so far.

Safe travels! -Canaan

double-quotes-end.png

I have thought about this and it definitely seems like this is what he is doing at times. His lack of understanding HOS is what has me believing that he just doesn't know what he is doing SOMETIMES. While I was driving, we were discussing the 34-hour reset provision. I made a comment about some drivers who stay for months at a time not doing a reset and running off recaps. He said that at the end of 70 hours you have to do a reset. I explained how a person can run 8 to 9 hours every single day and never have to do a 34-hour reset. He said that eventually recaps will run out. I tried explaining that at midnight every day you get hours back from the time logged 9 days before the day just completed. My trainer told me that he has never gotten any more hours back other that what he had left the previous day. Basically, he thinks that a driver has a bank of 70 on-duty hours and once that is used up, a reset is mandatory. While that is technically true, he is not grasping that the 8 days are rolling. He said that he understands this, but his commentary says that he doesn't get it. Every 8 days, if not sooner, he does a reset.

I definitely agree that my trainer is training me well. I am not so sure if I didn't understand HOS or how to trip plan that he would be training me well. But, my driving has gotten pretty good, as evidenced by some of the areas that I have had to drive without an accident/incident. My backing is steadily improving. I have only my trainer to thank for that because he is the one correcting me and giving me pointers.

I think i miscalculated in my statement here. I was wrong. It is 7 days before the day just completed. Monday to Monday is an 8-day block. 24:00 rolls around to become Tuesday and 7 days before Monday is Monday. So, on Tuesday, the prior Monday's On-Duty hours become available on 70-hour total. Sorry about the confusion I may have caused.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

I attempted to reply earlier, nice long rambling post. Might have possibly ruffled some feathers. Of course it didnt send.shocked.png Short version. I applaud Kerry for his resilience. He is venting here so as not to let it cloud his vision. I would bet his trainer is learning from him as well in regards to hos and trip planning but is to proud to admit it. Group you seem a little harsh in your comments. Once again kudos to Kerry for rolling with it. Rambling as usual. Keep it hammer down and you will be running solo. Two hours into my first run I pulled over and almost puked. I felt like I was sitting outside the principals office knowing a paddling was coming. Good job man. Your positive attitude will prevail, you are well on the road to becoming a trucker not a steering wheel holder who blames everyone else for problems that may arise. God bless!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Canaan's Comment
member avatar

No confusion here, but thanks for the clarity, my initial comment was only to open the possibility of a "different" training style or learning opportunity. I see that you have also realized this. Look forward to reading the rest of your journey! Although It'll most likely be silently followed along -Canaan

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I'm by no means a driver, yet.. (one day) but I personally think that your trainer may actually be doing a good job, it seems to me like it's kind of like a reverse training. He may want to see what you know and understand, and if you can utilize said understanding and knowledge in real world situations, and is effectively playing dumb so you "teach" him. At least that's my understanding from what you have posted so far.

Safe travels! -Canaan

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I have thought about this and it definitely seems like this is what he is doing at times. His lack of understanding HOS is what has me believing that he just doesn't know what he is doing SOMETIMES. While I was driving, we were discussing the 34-hour reset provision. I made a comment about some drivers who stay for months at a time not doing a reset and running off recaps. He said that at the end of 70 hours you have to do a reset. I explained how a person can run 8 to 9 hours every single day and never have to do a 34-hour reset. He said that eventually recaps will run out. I tried explaining that at midnight every day you get hours back from the time logged 9 days before the day just completed. My trainer told me that he has never gotten any more hours back other that what he had left the previous day. Basically, he thinks that a driver has a bank of 70 on-duty hours and once that is used up, a reset is mandatory. While that is technically true, he is not grasping that the 8 days are rolling. He said that he understands this, but his commentary says that he doesn't get it. Every 8 days, if not sooner, he does a reset.

I definitely agree that my trainer is training me well. I am not so sure if I didn't understand HOS or how to trip plan that he would be training me well. But, my driving has gotten pretty good, as evidenced by some of the areas that I have had to drive without an accident/incident. My backing is steadily improving. I have only my trainer to thank for that because he is the one correcting me and giving me pointers.

double-quotes-end.png

I think i miscalculated in my statement here. I was wrong. It is 7 days before the day just completed. Monday to Monday is an 8-day block. 24:00 rolls around to become Tuesday and 7 days before Monday is Monday. So, on Tuesday, the prior Monday's On-Duty hours become available on 70-hour total. Sorry about the confusion I may have caused.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

No confusion here, but thanks for the clarity, my initial comment was only to open the possibility of a "different" training style or learning opportunity. I see that you have also realized this. Look forward to reading the rest of your journey! Although It'll most likely be silently followed along -Canaan

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I'm by no means a driver, yet.. (one day) but I personally think that your trainer may actually be doing a good job, it seems to me like it's kind of like a reverse training. He may want to see what you know and understand, and if you can utilize said understanding and knowledge in real world situations, and is effectively playing dumb so you "teach" him. At least that's my understanding from what you have posted so far.

Safe travels! -Canaan

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I have thought about this and it definitely seems like this is what he is doing at times. His lack of understanding HOS is what has me believing that he just doesn't know what he is doing SOMETIMES. While I was driving, we were discussing the 34-hour reset provision. I made a comment about some drivers who stay for months at a time not doing a reset and running off recaps. He said that at the end of 70 hours you have to do a reset. I explained how a person can run 8 to 9 hours every single day and never have to do a 34-hour reset. He said that eventually recaps will run out. I tried explaining that at midnight every day you get hours back from the time logged 9 days before the day just completed. My trainer told me that he has never gotten any more hours back other that what he had left the previous day. Basically, he thinks that a driver has a bank of 70 on-duty hours and once that is used up, a reset is mandatory. While that is technically true, he is not grasping that the 8 days are rolling. He said that he understands this, but his commentary says that he doesn't get it. Every 8 days, if not sooner, he does a reset.

I definitely agree that my trainer is training me well. I am not so sure if I didn't understand HOS or how to trip plan that he would be training me well. But, my driving has gotten pretty good, as evidenced by some of the areas that I have had to drive without an accident/incident. My backing is steadily improving. I have only my trainer to thank for that because he is the one correcting me and giving me pointers.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I think i miscalculated in my statement here. I was wrong. It is 7 days before the day just completed. Monday to Monday is an 8-day block. 24:00 rolls around to become Tuesday and 7 days before Monday is Monday. So, on Tuesday, the prior Monday's On-Duty hours become available on 70-hour total. Sorry about the confusion I may have caused.

double-quotes-end.png

I understood you as well, Kerry! Excellent diary; hope all is well. You can 'chat me up' anytime! I know, you're focused on training, as you should be...good sir.

Canaan ~ Have YOU made any decisions, yet? Tom's company is ALWAYS hiring in Ohio, if you don't want to go OTR , just have to get your CDL on your own. DML really IS a great Ohio company tho, too ~ I'll vouch for that!

Be safe, y'all!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Canaan's Comment
member avatar

Canaan ~ Have YOU made any decisions, yet? Tom's company is ALWAYS hiring in Ohio, if you don't want to go OTR , just have to get your CDL on your own. DML really IS a great Ohio company tho, too ~ I'll vouch for that!

Be safe, y'all!

~ Anne ~

Anne, I have a handful of companies that I would liked to get in with. Number 1 being maverick, followed by prime for their flatbed. The reason why I have yet to do so is due to health.

I'm stuck making trips to specialists at cleveland clinic trying to figure out what the hell is wrong with me. My Dr's and specialists on my side of Ohio have been 0 help and I have done nothing but gotten worse over this years time frame so far.

I pray I am able to get answers and heal up so i can get my butt in a drivers seat. And that whatever is wrong CAN be healed and cured/fixed and doesn't make me have to miss out on trucking.

Thanks for asking. Hope all is well in your side of the state! -Canaan

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Kerry, I owe you an apology, I confused you with two sides about the eating lol. He was the one that was having trouble. Sorry bout that. And sorry if I sounded like I was being combative with you too. I thought your trainer had been doing it longer. Hope all is well and you get through training with as little drama as possible.

Page 5 of 10 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More