No Loads For You….

Topic 31181 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
William J.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m curious how some of you might handle this situation. It’s happened to me numerous times that the company I work for. I work OTR. I drive hard. I drive every load they give me. I’ll get back to the yard on a Saturday morning or afternoon with plenty of hours still drive for the day. And for the week for that matter. I go in to dispatch and tell them I’m ready for a new load. They tell me they don’t have anything until Monday morning. They tell me I’m welcome to go home. The only problem is home is five hours each way for me. Aren’t they obligated to pay me to sit there from Saturday morning until Monday morning? They tell me if I go home I should be back Monday morning. Which is ridiculous for a 10 hour round-trip drive. I tell them no, if I go home I’m going home for a minimum of four days. Your choice. Find me a load or pay me to sit here or I go home for four days. Was I fair with these options? How would you handle this?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

No, they are obligated to pay you for sitting out the weekend. It's quite common for some shippers to only ship mon-fri.

I see a few options right off the bat.

1- Do what a gazillion other OTR drivers do, and bust out as many miles as you can during the week, using up as much of your 70 as you can. Then when you roll in on Saturday, you can squeeze in a natural 34 and be ready to roll Monday morning with a fresh clock.

Or

2- Space your loads out enough so that you run on recaps 7 days a week, negating the need to sit at the terminal for a reset.

Or

3- You can try to give them a heads up on your availability for a load long before you roll in on Saturday. With enough warning, they may be able to find you a load before you get there. If not, refer back to options 1 or 2.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Or option 4... Ask them to look for a load that delivers fairly close to your home so that you can get to the house easier and be ready to roll Monday morning. As Turtle said, no they don't have to pay you for the weekend to sit away from home.

Laura

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Small carrier is my guess? Sometimes the small fish have less of a bite in the large freight pond. Maybe there are no loads indeed. Do they broker the loads, or is this handled in-house?

If there are loads that you are not being assigned, do a self-analysis on yourself and make double sure your are worthy of dispatch keeping your wheels turning more. How's your relationship with dispatch? How long have you been with the company? How long have you been driving?

Lastly, once you're sure it really is "them, not me", be the squeaky wheel and get into a pattern of bugging dispatchers twice a day about that next load, well ahead of time. Always keep them updated with an accurate PTA, even if it changes during a day.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

William, I love the answers you are getting here.

I'll throw in my two cents...

One of the biggest things that helped me in my trucking career was to make a big effort at learning how the trucking business works, and more in particular, how my specific company works. One of the first things I figured out was that weekends are terrible times to get loads. Once I knew that I had to figure out how to handle it so I could have a load on the weekend. Here was my solution, and it has always worked well for me. I empty out just as early as I can on Friday morning and I make sure my dispatcher knows that is how it is going to happen. I want him to know that my PTA (projected time of availability) will be 0700 Friday morning. That way he can hook me up with a nice long load for the weekend. He always comes through, but he comes through because I have communicated with him early enough for him to take care of it, and I always make sure that I do exactly what I tell him I am going to do.

It sounds like this has been an ongoing problem for you. So you know already what is going to happen if you show up on Saturday morning. Why keep repeating this self-defeating behavior? Make some changes to how you do things. Run a little harder so you can be MT on Friday morning instead of showing up Saturday expecting them to have a load for you. It is not going to happen. You are the captain of your ship. That means you run that ship in such a way that makes sense and is efficient. A big part of your efficiency is understanding how to do things with your truck so that they mesh with the way the company distributes loads.

You have to be the student and the teacher in this situation. You learn how things work, and then you take the steps to put yourself into the flow of work from your company. Trying to demand they pay you for sitting around will get you no results. You will frustrate yourself and anger the people who could be helping you be successful. You have got to put yourself into the right mindset, and put yourself into the right place at the right time. That's part of becoming a professional driver.

I wish you the best with this situation. Try to figure out how you can reconcile it yourself. There is definitely a way to make this work better for you.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

William J.'s Comment
member avatar

Or option 4... Ask them to look for a load that delivers fairly close to your home so that you can get to the house easier and be ready to roll Monday morning. As Turtle said, no they don't have to pay you for the weekend to sit away from home.

Laura

OK but do you see my logic behind my original question, I drive back-and-forth to the yard. It’s five hours each way. So I’ve got 10 hours vested if I go home. Not to mention it’s about $200 round-trip in my truck plus gas. So let’s say I have them dispatch me from close to my home which I can do. I show up at the yard on a Saturday morning per the way they assigned me my loads. Say it’s 10 AM. I have eight hours left to drive on my clock. 35 hours left for the week. I go into the office and they tell me they don’t have a load. At that point in my opinion they have two choices. Send me a dispatch to go home in their truck, or pay me to sit on their yard. Otherwise I’m literally a prisoner stuck at that yard with no transportation, no way to make money, and I’m at their disposal. I don’t know where you all come from but where I come from that is not fair. Lol that’s like slavery type stuff.

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

Old School if I could only start my idea of a trucking company (its doable just need to figure out how to compete) I would hire you to manage the drivers as well as drive the best runs etc

William J.'s Comment
member avatar

William, I love the answers you are getting here.

I'll throw in my two cents...

One of the biggest things that helped me in my trucking career was to make a big effort at learning how the trucking business works, and more in particular, how my specific company works. One of the first things I figured out was that weekends are terrible times to get loads. Once I knew that I had to figure out how to handle it so I could have a load on the weekend. Here was my solution, and it has always worked well for me. I empty out just as early as I can on Friday morning and I make sure my dispatcher knows that is how it is going to happen. I want him to know that my PTA (projected time of availability) will be 0700 Friday morning. That way he can hook me up with a nice long load for the weekend. He always comes through, but he comes through because I have communicated with him early enough for him to take care of it, and I always make sure that I do exactly what I tell him I am going to do.

It sounds like this has been an ongoing problem for you. So you know already what is going to happen if you show up on Saturday morning. Why keep repeating this self-defeating behavior? Make some changes to how you do things. Run a little harder so you can be MT on Friday morning instead of showing up Saturday expecting them to have a load for you. It is not going to happen. You are the captain of your ship. That means you run that ship in such a way that makes sense and is efficient. A big part of your efficiency is understanding how to do things with your truck so that they mesh with the way the company distributes loads.

You have to be the student and the teacher in this situation. You learn how things work, and then you take the steps to put yourself into the flow of work from your company. Trying to demand they pay you for sitting around will get you no results. You will frustrate yourself and anger the people who could be helping you be successful. You have got to put yourself into the right mindset, and put yourself into the right place at the right time. That's part of becoming a professional driver.

I wish you the best with this situation. Try to figure out how you can reconcile it yourself. There is definitely a way to make this work better for you.

Really good stuff! I guess for the driver who enjoys unexpected time off this type of scenario of slipping through the cracks would be great. Lol what I will do in the future is contact dispatch when I know this scenario might come up, and be like, “hey you got me lined out to be back at the yard Saturday morning, I have (XYZ hours) can we get me assigned a next load”

Something like this might work. Part of the problem with this is the first to trucking companies I’ve worked for this kind of stuff didn’t happen. So I’m kind of subconsciously comparing I think. They would have a load ready for me at the yard. Lol it would usually hit my QUALCOMM a day or so before I even got back to the yard.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi William, Do you pick up, and deliver your load on time? I ask this because what your describing is generally how companies get rid of their bad drivers, they starve them out.

If you're doing everything right then it's a dispatcher problem and you should try getting a new dispatcher from the your company.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Art M.'s Comment
member avatar

How would I handle it? Hm.. maybe start with being polite with the dispatch? Talk to them about it nicely and come up with the plan to run OTR over the weekend, so I'd not hit Sat and Sun companies being closed. Also, we can not avoid 70hr rule any way we'd try. Have to go recap or 34 reset.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Becoming A Truck Driver Dispatcher Issues Hard Lessons Learned Life On The Road
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More