Sitting In A Truck All Day

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John C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi All I am currently debating on getting my cdl , I want to make a career change after 30 years as a painting contractor. I dont mind at all being by myself all day, but I am concerned about sitting in a truck for 8-12 hours a day. I know I can even get really frustrated while driving in a car for two hours. Is there a difference knowing you are getting paid while driving? How have any of you new or experienced truck drivers adjusted to the long hours of driving? Its my biggest concern, so it will be a decision maker for me. I will be 60 years old the end of January, so have mellowed out over the years. Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mark O. ~MiNi-Me~'s Comment
member avatar

If two hours is frustrating, you night want to reconsider. I'm new, like really new, but I didn't mind long car rides as a driver to begin with. I've done several 10+ drives behind the wheel of a semi over the last several weeks, just a 30 break and maybe a short fuel stop... I'm done for sure by the time it over. Perhaps you can ask around to ride along with someone just to see how you do?

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

If you drive longer than local, you will be in your truck close to 24 hours every day minus home time :-)

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I was a contractor for 30 plus years before starting on this career. If you were anything like the rest of the construction industry, driving kills us, so we just wanted to get it over and done with.

I find driving the truck to be much closer to riding a motorcycle. It requires constant negotiating and vigilance. My mind is constantly playing what if scenarios like on a bike, and there is a constant source of adjustments that must be made, speed control, hills, Jake brakes, curves and turns. Plus, I Know I can't out maneuver, out brake nor out accelerate a car so theres no point in even playing the traffic game.

I find it therapeutic to drive, you sit up above cars and go slow enough to take scenery coupled with the skills improvement and challenges.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome John!

I believe there are options for you that would reduce the amount of contiguous time driving.

Many Dedicated accounts require shorter drives, but have multiple stops throughout the route.

I was running Walmart Dedicated with Swift for 8+ years. Typically drove a maximum of 3 hours to my first stop, and from there the stops (up to 5 additional) were typically clustered within a 30-45 minute radius. Swift, Schneider, HB Hunt, US Express and other mega carriers have dedicated routes.

LTL is your other option. I know for a fact YRC will hire and train rookies. Line haul could be an option and like many dedicated accounts your drive is broken up; for example 4 hours to your drop sight, grab a new set and drive the return trip of 4 hours.

Due to a life change decision to move; I now shuttle doubles for Performance Food Group. I make 2-3 round trips per night, each trip is less than 3 hours. They are a national company and will hire and train rookies.

Please realize you can take a short break on any driving job if you need a coffee, rest room break or just get out of the cab to walk around. In fact I strongly suggest doing that for anyone trying to establish driving endurance.

I won’t bore you with all the details...point is; due to the current state of affairs in the trucking industry, rookie drivers have more options available to them now.

That said...please take a look at these links and invest some time reading the material. It will help establish a knowledge base, set realistic expectations and provide necessary training for passing the CLP exam.

Ask as many questions as you like. We are here to assist. Best of luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

John C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thats encouraging Davy I use to love to ride my motorcycle,,, although I just sold it,,, Keeping my mind active is important, so knowing I will have to be constantly aware is a good thing.

I was a contractor for 30 plus years before starting on this career. If you were anything like the rest of the construction industry, driving kills us, so we just wanted to get it over and done with.

I find driving the truck to be much closer to riding a motorcycle. It requires constant negotiating and vigilance. My mind is constantly playing what if scenarios like on a bike, and there is a constant source of adjustments that must be made, speed control, hills, Jake brakes, curves and turns. Plus, I Know I can't out maneuver, out brake nor out accelerate a car so theres no point in even playing the traffic game.

I find it therapeutic to drive, you sit up above cars and go slow enough to take scenery coupled with the skills improvement and challenges.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bumping this...

Welcome John!

I believe there are options for you that would reduce the amount of contiguous time driving.

Many Dedicated accounts require shorter drives, but have multiple stops throughout the route.

I was running Walmart Dedicated with Swift for 8+ years. Typically drove a maximum of 3 hours to my first stop, and from there the stops (up to 5 additional) were typically clustered within a 30-45 minute radius. Swift, Schneider, HB Hunt, US Express and other mega carriers have dedicated routes.

LTL is your other option. I know for a fact YRC will hire and train rookies. Line haul could be an option and like many dedicated accounts your drive is broken up; for example 4 hours to your drop sight, grab a new set and drive the return trip of 4 hours.

Due to a life change decision to move; I now shuttle doubles for Performance Food Group. I make 2-3 round trips per night, each trip is less than 3 hours. They are a national company and will hire and train rookies.

Please realize you can take a short break on any driving job if you need a coffee, rest room break or just get out of the cab to walk around. In fact I strongly suggest doing that for anyone trying to establish driving endurance.

I won’t bore you with all the details...point is; due to the current state of affairs in the trucking industry, rookie drivers have more options available to them now.

That said...please take a look at these links and invest some time reading the material. It will help establish a knowledge base, set realistic expectations and provide necessary training for passing the CLP exam.

Ask as many questions as you like. We are here to assist. Best of luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

John C.'s Comment
member avatar

Ohh, thats great, sounds like a perfect fit, Thats what I would like to do, LTL and dedicated routes, There is so much info out there, I am sure I will find a my place Thanks!

Welcome John!

I believe there are options for you that would reduce the amount of contiguous time driving.

Many Dedicated accounts require shorter drives, but have multiple stops throughout the route.

I was running Walmart Dedicated with Swift for 8+ years. Typically drove a maximum of 3 hours to my first stop, and from there the stops (up to 5 additional) were typically clustered within a 30-45 minute radius. Swift, Schneider, HB Hunt, US Express and other mega carriers have dedicated routes.

LTL is your other option. I know for a fact YRC will hire and train rookies. Line haul could be an option and like many dedicated accounts your drive is broken up; for example 4 hours to your drop sight, grab a new set and drive the return trip of 4 hours.

Due to a life change decision to move; I now shuttle doubles for Performance Food Group. I make 2-3 round trips per night, each trip is less than 3 hours. They are a national company and will hire and train rookies.

Please realize you can take a short break on any driving job if you need a coffee, rest room break or just get out of the cab to walk around. In fact I strongly suggest doing that for anyone trying to establish driving endurance.

I won’t bore you with all the details...point is; due to the current state of affairs in the trucking industry, rookie drivers have more options available to them now.

That said...please take a look at these links and invest some time reading the material. It will help establish a knowledge base, set realistic expectations and provide necessary training for passing the CLP exam.

Ask as many questions as you like. We are here to assist. Best of luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

G-Town, Do you drive doubles in Virginia for PFG?

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

G-Town, Do you drive doubles in Virginia for PFG?

No sir. Harrington DE to Swedesboro NJ and Piscataway NJ.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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