Advice For My CDL Test

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Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
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First, words of wisdom for others who may be learn by your example. This is one of the reasons we preach the company sponsored training option over private schools. Going to school doesn't guarantee you'll get a CDL. Results vary by student and school, but on average only 80% of the time does a student at a private school earn a CDL. In my area several schools have a graduation rate around 50%. What becomes of the poor souls who finish their training without a CDL? They develop coping skills about the hole in their savings account. Some proceed with, "additional training for ~$800/day! Now, had you been attending company school you would have tested. If you fail you get, "recycled" - put in the class one week behind you and given another week for the tasks to soak in at no additional cost or obligation to you. The company school gets paid to put drivers in trucks, the private school gets paid to, "provide instruction" - whether you get your CDL or not isn't their problem.

You've really got two hurdles here. One, finding an O/O or L/O willing to let you drive their truck (a company driver would get FIRED for letting you drive their truck). Two, finding an insurance agent who is o.k. letting you drive that O/O's or L/O's truck. Most of the hiring decisions in the industry aren't made by the person or company who owns the truck they're made by the agent who insures the truck. I called the school where I got my CDL (in Colorado no less). They said they couldn't help (insurance) but suggested, Springs Truck Driving School. They offer skills test training for folks in your position and have a 99.5% pass rate.

Aughhh, ya beat me.

Spot on, good sir.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Not sure if you’ve had an opportunity to visit the Ladies Forum on Trucking Truth.

Good luck...sounds like you’ve got things going in the right direction.

Shantiwa W.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for the advice, I actually really wanted to attend springs trucking school but I had called several times and left messages with no answer and when I drove to the school all the gates were locked and I couldn’t get in to even speak to anyone. Excel is a really great school too though and the only instructor I’ve had problems with is the backing instructor. The CEO is so awesome and down to earth as well as most all the trainers there. It’s like a family when you walk through their doors and they go out of their way to help you succeed. I didn’t really have much of a choice for company sponsored training due to being a single mother so private school was really all I could do and luckily I got a grant to pay for it

First, words of wisdom for others who may be learn by your example. This is one of the reasons we preach the company sponsored training option over private schools. Going to school doesn't guarantee you'll get a CDL. Results vary by student and school, but on average only 80% of the time does a student at a private school earn a CDL. In my area several schools have a graduation rate around 50%. What becomes of the poor souls who finish their training without a CDL? They develop coping skills about the hole in their savings account. Some proceed with, "additional training for ~$800/day! Now, had you been attending company school you would have tested. If you fail you get, "recycled" - put in the class one week behind you and given another week for the tasks to soak in at no additional cost or obligation to you. The company school gets paid to put drivers in trucks, the private school gets paid to, "provide instruction" - whether you get your CDL or not isn't their problem.

You've really got two hurdles here. One, finding an O/O or L/O willing to let you drive their truck (a company driver would get FIRED for letting you drive their truck). Two, finding an insurance agent who is o.k. letting you drive that O/O's or L/O's truck. Most of the hiring decisions in the industry aren't made by the person or company who owns the truck they're made by the agent who insures the truck. I called the school where I got my CDL (in Colorado no less). They said they couldn't help (insurance) but suggested, Springs Truck Driving School. They offer skills test training for folks in your position and have a 99.5% pass rate.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Shantiwa W.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you so much Anne! I’m glad I’ve gotten so much great advice from everyone. I went to Walmart and the only toy they had was a big rig tanker truck so I snatched it before anyone else could lol I’ll look into those people for advice and watch YouTube videos!

Have you thought of team driving with your husband!? That would be really cool. It was a dream of mine at one point

Howdy, Shantiwa!

It's AWESOME to hear they are giving you extra time and training!!!! Speaking up does one good, haha! (In appropriation, tho...)

I'm a trucker's wife, but had my permit twice .. and drove (and learned) for 6 months, twice.

Hubby pulled tanks for an Owner Op, so .. opportunities for my furtherance didn't abound. I DID learn a LOT, tho ... out there, AND right here; and the info they're all giving you is SPOT ON.

From a female; elbows in (till ya feel like you're smushing your puppies) ... and it'll help you focus.

SECOND. That toy tractor trailer? We still have the John Deere on the shelf here. Sure helps!

0151456001640823885.jpg

I wish you WELL, ma'am!

Follow Truckin Along With Kearsey here & on YouTube as you can or choose; she's honest & awesome .. and IDMtnGal (Ms. Laura.) Both have contact information in their profiles. Fellow female idols of mine, for sure!

I wish you well, fellow female aspiring !

~ Anne ~

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Shantiwa W.'s Comment
member avatar

I’ll have to use that forum, thank you for reminding me of it, also I got a toy truck from Walmart. I know this will really help me! Thank you for the advice

Not sure if you’ve had an opportunity to visit the Ladies Forum on Trucking Truth.

Good luck...sounds like you’ve got things going in the right direction.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

I’ll have to use that forum, thank you for reminding me of it, also I got a toy truck from Walmart. I know this will really help me! Thank you for the advice

Unless it's really female specific, just post your questions here where they will get readily answered. Different guys and Anne go in that forum sometimes and answer questions. She sometimes flags me to go and answer the question. Otherwise I just stay in the General Forum. There is good info in that one.

Laura

Shantiwa W.'s Comment
member avatar

Awesome thank you! Any advice on calming nerves on test day 😬 I think that’s part of my problem as well

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I’ll have to use that forum, thank you for reminding me of it, also I got a toy truck from Walmart. I know this will really help me! Thank you for the advice

double-quotes-end.png

Unless it's really female specific, just post your questions here where they will get readily answered. Different guys and Anne go in that forum sometimes and answer questions. She sometimes flags me to go and answer the question. Otherwise I just stay in the General Forum. There is good info in that one.

Laura

Shantiwa W.'s Comment
member avatar

I think that’s what was confusing me with all the backing is that when you back you have to turn the opposite way but when you pull forward you need to pull up the same direction. Thank you for reminding me of that, I guess my brain was just getting confused until you explained it like that. Thank you!

As stated, it's difficult to offer advice on how to correct a problem if we aren't there to see it. The purpose of the pull up on an offset is to get yourself aligned so you can just straight-back right into your space. If you complete the steps of the offset and your trailer is pointing towards the left side of the box just turn your wheel slightly to the left and pull forward slowly. You wil see in the mirror that you are straightening out. Once you have it lined up, stop, straighten the wheel, and straight-back right in. If your trailer is pointing towards the right side of the box turn the wheel slightly to the right and follow the same steps as above.

It seems counterintuitive to steer left whole pulling forward when your trailer is pointing left, but that is what you need to do, and vice versa.

Banks's Comment
member avatar
Any advice on calming nerves on test day

Nope. Nothing anybody says here is going to get rid of the nerves.

There was 3 of us in my class when I was training at FedEx. I struggled the most and tested last after the first 2 passed. I also stalled out pulling out of the yard. My nerves were shot. What put me at ease was a conversation I had with the tester before the test. He told me what his expectations were, what his experience was (retired CDL driver with 20 years experience) and that he was there to pass me. All I had to do was show him what I know. Still nervous, but a little at ease.

Sometimes, a simple conversation goes a long way.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Shantiwa W.'s Comment
member avatar

That actually makes sense, humanizing the tester lol The tester I got is known for her bad attitude so I tried to strike up a conversation with her and just have a good time but she was super rude and then I started forgetting everything 🙄😂 My tester on Monday is a lot more laid back and likes to joke and have fun so I think that’ll help my nerves

double-quotes-start.png

Any advice on calming nerves on test day

double-quotes-end.png

Nope. Nothing anybody says here is going to get rid of the nerves.

There was 3 of us in my class when I was training at FedEx. I struggled the most and tested last after the first 2 passed. I also stalled out pulling out of the yard. My nerves were shot. What put me at ease was a conversation I had with the tester before the test. He told me what his expectations were, what his experience was (retired CDL driver with 20 years experience) and that he was there to pass me. All I had to do was show him what I know. Still nervous, but a little at ease.

Sometimes, a simple conversation goes a long way.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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