Trucker Road Rage

Topic 31289 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

My first incident of road rage as a truck driver. I was headed north on I5. Some highway was merging from the right and I had 2 small cars on my left. A trucker was trying to merge, not slowing down. I could not get over and to give the dirtbag a little credit he couldn’t see the cars on my other side. If I held my lane, we would have collided. He started pushing me over and I creeped over until the 2 stupid 4 wheelers got out of the way…with my blinker on the whole time, mind you. They either didn’t see it or didn’t care. I passed the guy in the truck and he gave me the one finger salute. Ok. No problem dude.

So once I get back in the right lane, he blows by me on the left, the whole time blowing his air horn and flipping me off. Then he pulls in front of me and brake checks me. Really dude, aren’t you over it yet!?!? Nope. He gets back in the left lane, slows way down and gets behind me. I just keep driving. Until, of course, my mean attack dog has to go to the bathroom. I pull into a rest area and he follows me. Parks about 3 spaces away and sits there glaring at me. I grab my attack dog and my stun gun just in case…it is daytime and there’s lots of people everywhere so I’m not worried. I figure I’ll just wait him out. I have 5 days to make a 2 day drive. I also used my phone and blatantly took photos of his truck, him, license plates etc.

Went back to my truck and made lunch. Caught up on Facebook. Read my local news. Pulled my curtains. He finally left after about an hour. Never did confront me. Never said a word. I’d like to think my dog scared him away lol

0480213001640925283.jpg

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Canaan's Comment
member avatar

That is one adorable dog

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

The pug is no longer w us. The black one is a puggle.

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

Well the pic did not load nvm.

0427669001640926888.jpg

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

Wow! There you go. Computer illiterate I am.

Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

Well the pic did not load nvm.

0427669001640926888.jpg

Adorable!

Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

That is one adorable dog

Thank you. She knows it too lol

BK's Comment
member avatar

Vicki, Rudeness is the weak mans imitation of strength.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I do not condone the other truckers behavior. Not one bit, he’s an idiot. He could have caused a serious wreck. Preventable not only by him, ...but also by you.

So yes... you can learn from this and adjust your approach reducing the risk of an encounter like this.

I strongly suggest that when approaching an on-ramp on a crowded Interstate , if at all possible to give way to a Brother or Sister trucker. Back off and slow down. It’s defensive, prudent and can keep you out of trouble like this. Yes I know he was supposed to yield to you he was wrong. But you must think like a trucker not a 4-wheeler. In the future assume and accept that a semi entering the Interstate will not yield to you. Most are speeding up expecting you to give way to them. It’s not right, but it’s reality.

I have experienced exactly the same initial situation you described , hundreds of times over the past 9 years. Each and every time I conduct myself exactly how I suggested it to you. Give way and live another day.

Good luck. Peace all.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

's Comment
member avatar

It is incidents like this that create a public perception and environment that leads to more and more regulation, and more aggressive/mandatory sentences for violations. Were you afraid for your life? No doubt - I would have been. But how do you think the two four-wheelers felt? And how many of their friends and family got to hear the story? And it doesn’t matter if they recognized the true hazard, and proper response - they were put in danger by a commercial driver.

Now I was taught to “merge aggressively” or in other words make a space. If anyone here has ever merged onto I95 from South Street in Philadelphia you’ll understand why - short steep incline ramps with no opportunity to build merging speed, and fast moving high density traffic to merge into. You stop and in could be 30 minutes before you can get out. That being said I was also taught that I can’t see everything, especially around or through other vehicles. How often does someone in front of you brake for no apparent reason, only for you to discover there was another vehicle in front of them that you didn’t see, or some kind of hazard (around here it’s deer) that you also hadn’t seen?

The sign on the ramp clearly reads “YIELD” - we all know that, and in the end that is the governing law, regardless of best practices and professional courtesy. That drivers behavior was not only unprofessional and inappropriate in every way, it was hazardous and unnecessary. Me, I would have videod everything that happened after the merge incident and called the State Police from the rest stop.

Here’s the hard truth - nobody wants to throw another driver under the bus, but this industry needs to start self-policing incidents like this to get dangerous drivers off the road.

Gregg

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Hard Lessons Learned Photos Safe Driving Tips
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More