Is Western Express A Good Company To Work For?

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Kwan R.'s Comment
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Is western express a good company to work for?

Daniel B.'s Comment
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Yes, Western Express is a great place to start your trucking career. Any company is a good company if they fit your needs and if you're a safe and reliable driver. We actually have an old man on this forum who works for Western Express. I'm sure he will pop in here as soon as he sees the title. But I did want to mention, we actually have a thread about Western Express that you might be interested in. In it you'll find a ton of information about the company. But in the end, if WE fits your needs then go for it!

Discussion about Western Express

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Kwan R.'s Comment
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Yes, Western Express is a great place to start your trucking career. Any company is a good company if they fit your needs and if you're a safe and reliable driver. We actually have an old man on this forum who works for Western Express. I'm sure he will pop in here as soon as he sees the title. But I did want to mention, we actually have a thread about Western Express that you might be interested in. In it you'll find a ton of information about the company. But in the end, if WE fits your needs then go for it!

Discussion about Western Express

Thanks i been reading different reviews and i see a lot of bad things. i want to do flatbed

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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There are many companies that would be interested in you so apply to all of them and see what each of them offers. And don't even bother with those online reviews. Trucking has a lot of bad drivers that think they're amazing when in reality they suck at their job and have a rotten attitude. So when things go south for them they naturally blame the company for their errors. And where do they migrate? To online review sites.

A company reputation doesn't mean anything. You, and you alone, decide how happy you are with a company.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Old School's Comment
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Kwan, this trucking career is unlike almost any other job - to tell you the truth it is more like being self-employed than any other type of job I know of. I don't have a clue about who my boss is, I don't know anybody at Western Express, and I don't ever talk to anyone there except an occasional driver at a truck stop. I never have anyone watching over me or telling me what to do or how to do it. You have to be a self motivated person who is willing to work hard and get things done, because if you don't you won't be making any money. I make around ten bills a week most weeks now - I've been with them for right at a year now.

Kwan, you can't go by those stupid internet reviews - they are done by people who didn't have the stuff it takes to make it in this job. Guys like me that are doing well simply don't have the time to sit around at the computer and tell others how great our job is. The key to success at any trucking company is your willingness to go the extra mile and do what ever it takes to get things accomplished, a lot of people don't have those kind of work ethics. I worked till midnight last night, and just as soon as I get finished with this message to you I'm hitting it again. I was supposed to be home yesterday, but I got a message from dispatch that they needed me to go rescue a load from a disgruntled driver who quit and abandoned his truck with a load of steel on the trailer. The kind of people who write those terrible reviews would have been telling you something like this "they never get you home and expect you to be their slave"... but the kind of person who is successful at this stuff says yeah, I'll go get that load, but try and get me home as soon as you can after that. I put an extra 400 bucks on my paycheck this week because I was willing to go get that load and do what it took to get it delivered on time. This job is completely performance based - the guys that work really hard and long hours get the big pay checks - The guys that expect a big paycheck and aren't willing to make the sacrifices necessary to make that kind of money go home and write terrible reviews about the company. That's just the raw truth about how it works.

Which company you work for has little bearing on your success at this career, what kind of person is behind the wheel determines 99% of your success. So if you can find someone who can write a review on what type of person you are, then study that review and it will hold all the secrets to whether you are going to succeed at this job or not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Kwan, congratulations by the way, on your success at obtaining your CDL!

I just wanted to add something to this thread, not only for you, but for others who will be looking at this also. While I do really well at this flat-bedding gig, I talk to a lot of drivers who just don't seem to be making it work right. This is a universal problem in trucking. There seems to be ten to one drivers who just can't seem to break through the barriers and difficulties of the job to get to the point where they are making good money and having the degree of success that makes them satisfied with their job. People jump into this career with all these falsely glorified ideas of what it means to be an American truck driver. The truth is that it is just downright tough to break into this career. There is so much to learn, and so many unexpected frustrations during that critical first year that a lot of people quit before they ever get to the point of being a true professional.

If you go into truck driving thinking you are going to be making the big bucks right off from the start you will be sorely disappointed. When I first started my paychecks were very erratic. I might get a check for seven or eight hundred dollars and then the next week get one for two hundred fifty dollars, and it seemed like I had worked just as hard both weeks. There's a relationship that will develop between you and your dispatcher as you develop as a driver. There's a thousand and one things that you will learn to do to help you manage the time you have available for driving, which is the time you are making money. I spend a lot of time working on stuff that doesn't net me a red cent, every decent truck driver has duties that he does that don't pay him anything. Heck, I couldn't even take a guess at how much time I spent this past year repairing lights and mud flaps on my trailers. But, it is much less time than I would have spent waiting around and burning up my driving time waiting on someone else to do the job for me. Being pro-active about protecting your drive time is a multifaceted benefit to your take home pay in this business.

I know you didn't ask about these things specifically, but they get to the heart of your question about whether this is a good company to work for. In my opinion they are a great company to work for, but this filter Brett has on here won't even let me begin to let me tell you what another driver said to me about Western Express tonight at the truck stop. It's odd, don't you think, that he would be so bitterly disgruntled, and I so happy with the same company? He and I are running the same type of loads, in the same freight lanes, with identical equipment. I've been very successful, and he didn't have one good thing to say, in fact he was extremely angry and bitter at them for the way he's being treated. He told me he would soon be quitting and going with another company. I'll let you in on a bitter little secret that he is unaware of - it doesn't matter where he goes, because he is the problem. What he needs is a serious look in the mirror, but it's always easier to blame some perceived external force working against you.

Hey if you'd like to see how I run with Western Express you can follow that link to a brief diary I kept during a time when my daughter was riding with me. It will give you an idea how much a Western Express driver moves around and what it's like being out there on the road doing the flat-bed thing.

Best of luck to ya Kwan, hope to see you out there one day.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Twisted sister 's Comment
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Is western express a good company to work for?

I'm curious to know I'd you went to western express I'm new to this and I'm curious..

Bryon U.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, Western Express is a great place to start your trucking career. Any company is a good company if they fit your needs and if you're a safe and reliable driver. We actually have an old man on this forum who works for Western Express. I'm sure he will pop in here as soon as he sees the title. But I did want to mention, we actually have a thread about Western Express that you might be interested in. In it you'll find a ton of information about the company. But in the end, if WE fits your needs then go for it!

Discussion about Western Express

I work at Western and like it a lot

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

L.X Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Seeking help with information , I was sponsored by A COMPANY to get my cdl , got my cdl had family problems so I could not go to orientation. Some reason I tryed to make payment plan with the school the owner said know and they will send it to the collection agency even better for me! I call the company who sponsored my school do to the fact I didn't make it to orientation I didn't have employment I'd and as well I am not under contract ,ok now it gets good I went to ptl orientation in Kentucky and they call the school and said I was under contract but think the sponsored school told me I was not under contract as well ! But Ptl could not hire me so I call the sponsored school to get orientation going they told me they would not hire me and I am disqualified and the school is giving me bad report ! My Dac is clean no injuries no wrecks nothing what company will hire me but when it comes down to the school they bad mouth me because he want his money that I owe !

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Soulja, you keep sharing this same information with us. And it's just not the whole story. If you don't seem to realize what the whole story is then you should dig a little deeper and get it straight, but it seems that we have tried to explain it to you multiple times without you really accepting what we have told you about CRST. I know you say you never went their orientation, but you did accept their willingness to pay for your schooling, and then you backed out of your agreement to work for them. Now they aren't going to pay and so the school rightfully wants their money which you owe them.

So... do the right thing, and pay up or shut up. Your complaining in here is getting old. You will not be able to get hired until you get this mess of your own making straightened out. You have no one to whom you can point your finger of blame except the person in the mirror.

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