Need Advice On Approaching Dispatcher

Topic 31693 | Page 1

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Taylar F.'s Comment
member avatar

To start off, I am actually the other dispatcher that was moved to other jobs in the company and management due to the current dispatcher and some issue there. Besides the fact, I have had several drivers call and talk to me about this newer dispatcher on how he is treating them, not responding to them for long periods of time when they are at terminals or waiting for their next dispatch (one driver gave me dash cam footage along with the call logs for over 5 hours of being ignored). I have tried to train and help the newer dispatcher understand the terminals, driver quirks and what they prefer and where they are unable to go. But, drivers get sent wrong places, non twic drivers have to tell him constantly they cannot go to terminals since they have no twic. I sent him a reference guide for the drivers and terminals again and got a nice response of "I know what I'm doing, I've been doing this for 30 years."

Now here a condensed list of some of the things this new dispatcher has done to my drivers: - driver didn't want to take a long haul move unless he had a local move after so he could make some profit since fuel prices are so expensive. Dispatcher got upset with him saying he was refusing the move for no reason when he will update a local move the next morning. (he's said that before then didn't follow thru so driver didn't want to do that.) Was then told that since he just complains instead, he gets no dispatch and can stay home and hung up. When I rushed over there (sounds like retaliation of some sort) he told me that he's busy and pushed me aside and left for 30 minutes.

- drivers wait for 1-5 hours for updates on their next moves or for any issues at terminals being fixed. (when I help and respond, I get told off and that I'm making him look bad and that he's needing to talk to the boss about the micromanagement.)

- drivers who can't go into certain terminals always get a move there. If they can't go to a certain city in a different state due to truck restrictions, they always get that dispatch. (They call my work cell and apologize for asking for help, so the new dispatcher has apparently told them I'm not in that area and wouldn't be able to assist.)

- three drivers didn't quit only because I dispatch them and he doesn't. Bosses had to sign that agreement and he still tries to dispatch them.

I think the overall idea is painted cause I can go on. Basically, from the trucking community, how can I help advocate and fight for my drivers? This **** seems illegal but I'm not sure how to go about it when the owner turns his back on them too. I'm not going to abandon them and I am going to keep trying, but I have also told them I'll be a reference for another job if they need me to be since they are loosing money from this guy. Any advice and help would be greatly appreciate from this actual dispatcher, and from my drivers

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Taylar;

I was hoping one of the 'pros' or vets or mods of this site would've replied, but then again..with what?

I'm sorry, we don't really train on 'people skills' as a forte' here on Trucking Truth, but for easing our drivers (newbies) into how to be kind to their dispatchers, to keep a smooth flow of their products being hauled.

Do y'all have a 'FLEET MANAGER' that is over 'ALL' dispatchers? Most large(r) companies do. If so, throw all that raucous in THAT person's lap! Other than that, sign up for a 'people skills' book; by Ray Mercado or someone; Thomas Erikson has audibles.

I'm sorry nobody here can really help you; do you even HAVE a CDLA? Most drivers think and WISH their dispatcher did/does!

Maybe THAT in and of itself would help?

Lastly, we have a 'tag' you can search on our forum; 'Dealing with Dispatch.' That may yield some results.

All I've got, sorry not sooner!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

If I am reading this correctly it sounds to me as if you have no power in this situation. I understand that is tough. You are obviously emotionally connected with some of the drivers, but it sounds as if they are no longer on your board. If that is the case you need to let it go. If there are real issues they will work themselves out eventually.

This is business. Try not to let your emotions get involved in business - that usually doesn't produce good results. In fact it usually backfires on the person who allows it. Focus on doing a great job yourself, and let the powers that you seem to think are ignoring this other dispatcher deal with it in their own way and time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Sometimes people need enough rope to hang themselves. Document everything. If he is trying to dispatch your drivers that management specifically stated is your job.... Then note it and report it.

I once asked my FM what he wanted to me to do if weekend or night dispatch told me to do something stupid. He said "do whatever u have to do and I will fix it later". You can't be Superman and take on the world.

Maybe consider another company who cares about the drivers.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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