Manufacturer Direct Shipping To Store

Topic 31776 | Page 1

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Joshua S.'s Comment
member avatar

Im wondering what I should charge if I take A LTL load from a furniture factory straight to the stores multi stop. Itl be my first load ever as a owner operator. Im gonna be using a 26ft non cdl box truck. The stops Probably be in a 500 mile radius. Not sure if its touch/no touch since its going straight to the store. I figured 4-5$ a mile?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

First load and you have no idea?

good-luck.gif

Joshua S.'s Comment
member avatar

First load and you have no idea?

good-luck.gif

I have a idea just curious as to what other peoples rates are. I more than likely will do it by the piece

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

This site is generally geared towards new or perspective drivers getting into the industry. There are very few OO on here, but mainly company drivers.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

I have a idea just curious as to what other peoples rates are. I more than likely will do it by the piece

This site is more to help people get started in getting their CDL A or B and then going over the road. We will help with LTL but as company drivers.

We do have Owner Operators and a few LO's, who may eventually comment. However you probably won't get much info on this site.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

You have key missing elements. Normally it is dependant on weight, number of stops, and mileage. I’m guessing your pricing at spot rate not contract rate. You also need to know who is loading at the factory and who unloads at each stop.

Figure out those answers and you can come up with a fair rate.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

🤔 Amazing someone would come into a website the know nothing about, yet seeking advice.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Before I got my CDL , I looked into starting a business doing box trucks. I went so far as to get my own authority, insurance and set up an llc. One of the main reasons I abandoned it was that they consume fuel at basically the same rate as a tractor and trailer yet have less than half of the capacity. Also the market was saturated and extremely competitive.

I did find some forms on box trucks and very few load boards, much less brokers. The majority of business was basically hauling piece work for Amazon contractors. They pretty much devoured the market. Tough grind and the last thing I want to do in the trucking industry is unload and load trucks. I've had more than enough hard labor.

I'd recommend some google jujitsu on boxtruck websites and look for links in YouTube videos. There are people out there having a go at it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Joshua S.'s Comment
member avatar

You have key missing elements. Normally it is dependant on weight, number of stops, and mileage. I’m guessing your pricing at spot rate not contract rate. You also need to know who is loading at the factory and who unloads at each stop.

Figure out those answers and you can come up with a fair rate.

The factory is like 8 mins from my house. So me being local will help but all I know right now is its multi stops to A plus rental stores. Furniture shipping right now is crazy high why im goin after it

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Joshua S.'s Comment
member avatar

You have key missing elements. Normally it is dependant on weight, number of stops, and mileage. I’m guessing your pricing at spot rate not contract rate. You also need to know who is loading at the factory and who unloads at each stop.

Figure out those answers and you can come up with a fair rate.

Im preaty confident alot of it will be factory employees and then store employees doing the unloading unless a store doesn't have a loading dock then I dont mind assisting. But my thinking is furniture and shipping it is pricey and cutting the middle man out should be a decent profit it should be within 500 miles for sure

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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