Class *B* OTR Jobs -- Any Suggestions?

Topic 31788 | Page 1

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BT's Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

Kinda new here, but have been involved in various types of professional driving jobs off and on for a long time. I currently have a class B CDL and am looking into my options for possible OTR work (ie straight truck w/ sleeper). I realize that I would have more options and potentially better pay with a class A, but honestly I'd just rather drive a straight truck than a tractor trailer these days (I have some class A OTR experience from many years ago, so I'm familiar with the lifestyle).

Without going into too much detail, I have an expensive medical procedure (not covered by insurance) that I'd like to have done as soon as I can afford it. It's not super-urgent and it's not anything that affects my ability to drive (I'm in my 40's and am in pretty good health otherwise), but IS something that I'd like to have done as soon as it's practically possible, so if I can realize my $ goal a little faster by sleeping in the cab every night and avoiding paying rent for an apartment for a year or two, I'll gladly make that sacrifice. I'm certainly not opposed to getting a local gig (home every night) IF it pays well enough, but the prospect of not paying rent for a while is pretty appealing to me right now, for the reason mentioned. If I can consistently average around $1k a week (net /take home), that would be ideal.

No wife or kids, so I don't mind running anywhere in the US and being out for weeks at a time, and I'm happy to run hard while I'm out. Not interested in running teams... just solo. Other than that, I'm pretty flexible. Clean MVR , other than 1 speeding ticket in my personal vehicle 6 months ago (first one in 28 YEARS, so reckon I was due :-)

That said, my main concern is that most of my CDL driving experience is in the distant past, so not sure how many companies might be interested in me because of that. I have @ 3 yrs of class A tractor trailer driving experience, but it's not verifiable (it was a very long time ago and both companies I worked for back then have since gone out of business). The only fairly recent CDL experience I have is 1.5 yrs of class B driving transit buses & shuttle vans (verifiable, but was 2-4 yrs ago). For the past couple years I've been doing 1099 work fulltime (mostly Uber/Lyft).

Any recommendations for specific companies I might look into? Or just general suggestions? I did a quick search of the forum here, but if I've overlooked a recent thread on the topic please let me know. Thanks in advance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all,

Kinda new here, but have been involved in various types of professional driving jobs off and on for a long time. I currently have a class B CDL and am looking into my options for possible OTR work (ie straight truck w/ sleeper). I realize that I would have more options and potentially better pay with a class A, but honestly I'd just rather drive a straight truck than a tractor trailer these days (I have some class A OTR experience from many years ago, so I'm familiar with the lifestyle).

Without going into too much detail, I have an expensive medical procedure (not covered by insurance) that I'd like to have done as soon as I can afford it. It's not super-urgent and it's not anything that affects my ability to drive (I'm in my 40's and am in pretty good health otherwise), but IS something that I'd like to have done as soon as it's practically possible, so if I can realize my $ goal a little faster by sleeping in the cab every night and avoiding paying rent for an apartment for a year or two, I'll gladly make that sacrifice. I'm certainly not opposed to getting a local gig (home every night) IF it pays well enough, but the prospect of not paying rent for a while is pretty appealing to me right now, for the reason mentioned. If I can consistently average around $1k a week (net /take home), that would be ideal.

No wife or kids, so I don't mind running anywhere in the US and being out for weeks at a time, and I'm happy to run hard while I'm out. Not interested in running teams... just solo. Other than that, I'm pretty flexible. Clean MVR , other than 1 speeding ticket in my personal vehicle 6 months ago (first one in 28 YEARS, so reckon I was due :-)

That said, my main concern is that most of my CDL driving experience is in the distant past, so not sure how many companies might be interested in me because of that. I have @ 3 yrs of class A tractor trailer driving experience, but it's not verifiable (it was a very long time ago and both companies I worked for back then have since gone out of business). The only fairly recent CDL experience I have is 1.5 yrs of class B driving transit buses & shuttle vans (verifiable, but was 2-4 yrs ago). For the past couple years I've been doing 1099 work fulltime (mostly Uber/Lyft).

Any recommendations for specific companies I might look into? Or just general suggestions? I did a quick search of the forum here, but if I've overlooked a recent thread on the topic please let me know. Thanks in advance.

Hay there,

Howdy & welcome to Trucking Truth, BT.

I've been 'trying' to get our 'Ryder' driver up in here for ya, to no avail. His forum name is " Not I. " ... he drives for Ryder. He's hemmed up w/ some hazmat and reflector tape questions, right now...but if you're still here, read his threads; there are a few. I've got a few 'diamonds' I share, but if you're not in the 'area' it'd be worthless.

Could you at least add your state???

In addition, just check this:

And then, just 'leap in/on!' Apply For Paid CDL Training.

Nothing to lose; many companies sure ARE looking at folks with prior/previous CDL experience of any & all kinds!!

Glad to have you; sorry for the late reply!

~ Anne ~

ps: Witte Bros. has an AWESOME refresher, and yes...CDLB op's, as well. Don't know where you are!

pps: A few 'other'/newer CDLB companies in the mix, nowadays, are ShipEx, and Panther Express.

ppps: Will add more as they come to mind, but please, utilize the above links! (If I have any more post scripts, I'll need a port a pottie, haha!)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Try expeditor companies such as Fex Ex Custom Critical , Panther, Hot Shot Express.

I've been 'trying' to get our 'Ryder' driver up in here for ya, to no avail. His forum name is " Not I. " ... he drives for Ryder.

He drives for a company that leases from Ryder not Ryder themselves

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

One possibility is delivering cars for Hogan, it’s one of their side businesses. But last I heard they only pay $16 per hour.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar
He drives for a company that leases from Ryder not Ryder themselves.

Ah, thanks! I didn't realize that.

Yeah, Panther is an awesome suggestion; I posted them as well. There are SO many opportunities, many may be regionally focused on hiring, however. That's why I mentioned adding his state, at least.

Would OD have 'anything' marginally useful for the OP? (I'm not fully understanding LTL..ever, haha!)

Sorry, but worth the asking! How's that bus driver doing with y'all? Long time no see. OP could always drive buses; school and/or Greyhound/Trailways, et al, too....

One possibility is delivering cars for Hogan, it’s one of their side businesses. But last I heard they only pay $16 per hour.

WOW, really ?!? News to me; always happy to have something interesting to add to the 'coffers' myself!

Hogan has an EXCELLENT reputation in the OTR industry.

Best to ya, O/P!

Be safe, BobCatBob & Bruce K...

~ Anne ~

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

BT's Comment
member avatar

Appreciate the replies everyone! I will look into the companies mentioned.

@ Anne- I'm currently in the Colorado high country west of Denver. But my apartment lease will be up soon, so I'm trying to figure out if I want to renew it, or if I want to become "mobile" for a while to save $ quicker. No kids or significant other currently, so I can pretty much up and leave at any time.

@ Bruce- I was always under the impression that car haulers were some of the better paid drivers out there. $16/hr is definitely no bueno!

I may have the option to go back to a local CDL-B shuttle gig here that would average $30+ /hr after tips. But it's seasonal and only busy / worth doing around 8 months a year. I may do that still, but just thought I'd see what my OTR "B" options might currently be, as I haven't looked in quite some time. The biggest potential advantage to doing that would be saving money on rent... that extra $1k/mo. can add up quick.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

If the seasonal work is summer, get your hazmat , hire-on with a heating oil delivery company in the winter.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

BT's Comment
member avatar

Thanks G-Town. It would be a year round position, just slow a couple months in the spring and a couple months in the fall. Back in my 20's I had a hazmat job slinging 40 lb propane tanks all day long. Was good $ back then, and a great workout... never needed to go to the gym. Not sure how "efficient" I would be at a job like that now, a couple decades later :-)

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks G-Town. It would be a year round position, just slow a couple months in the spring and a couple months in the fall. Back in my 20's I had a hazmat job slinging 40 lb propane tanks all day long. Was good $ back then, and a great workout... never needed to go to the gym. Not sure how "efficient" I would be at a job like that now, a couple decades later :-)

Denver, hmmm.. @Pianoman? Does your company have any part time CDLB positions, or perhaps y'all's affiliates??

If you were in Ohio, BT ... I'd have a handful of info!! And so....knowing THAT, let us know if you DO end UP here! :)

Best to you, sir.

Let us know!

~ Anne ~

ps: You 'could' look into Witte Bros. They HAD non'combo units back when, don't know about now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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