Almost Done The 6 Week Training

Topic 31894 | Page 1

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Drew D.'s Comment
member avatar

So the last two months have been quite a ride.

Spent two weeks getting my CDL training in a one on one condensed course, then moved onto my OTR job hauling reefer with a 6 week on board training with a trainer.

First, I definitely belong in this industry. I enjoy myself quite a bit. And my skills floating gears on a 13 speed have increased exponentially. I definitely see why people prefer the 13s to the 10s. Those split gears help.

That said, I have a couple take aways that I wouldn't mind an honest opinion on.

First, when downshifting a 13 speed, my instructor is insistent on splitting gears on the way down to a stop. I initially learn taking whole gears on the way down and find it, not only easier, but stops the truck faster. What are your thoughts on this?

Also, I am doing okay with backing but I am inconsistent. Infact, I tried setting up a straight back today and accidentally bopped the driver side fin due to over angle. My trainer genuinely didn't give a damn because he said it was good training. That said, what are some tips for a 90 degree setup? And regarding the 45 degree setup, I usually pull away to the 12 o clock after my shoulder hits the middle of the spot directly next to the spot I want. But when I do this, I feel like I get to close to the truck on my driver side mirror. Not sure if I am not chasing soon enough or what. But I did have more success pulling away to the 12 o clock after 2 full trucks beyond my space. Is there anything wrong with that?

I apologize if these are absurdly rookie questions. But I am trying to be successful.

That said, my trainer feels great about passing me and recommending me to my own truck.

Cheers and thanks all!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

So the last two months have been quite a ride.

Spent two weeks getting my CDL training in a one on one condensed course, then moved onto my OTR job hauling reefer with a 6 week on board training with a trainer.

First, I definitely belong in this industry. I enjoy myself quite a bit. And my skills floating gears on a 13 speed have increased exponentially. I definitely see why people prefer the 13s to the 10s. Those split gears help.

That said, I have a couple take aways that I wouldn't mind an honest opinion on.

First, when downshifting a 13 speed, my instructor is insistent on splitting gears on the way down to a stop. I initially learn taking whole gears on the way down and find it, not only easier, but stops the truck faster. What are your thoughts on this?

Also, I am doing okay with backing but I am inconsistent. Infact, I tried setting up a straight back today and accidentally bopped the driver side fin due to over angle. My trainer genuinely didn't give a damn because he said it was good training. That said, what are some tips for a 90 degree setup? And regarding the 45 degree setup, I usually pull away to the 12 o clock after my shoulder hits the middle of the spot directly next to the spot I want. But when I do this, I feel like I get to close to the truck on my driver side mirror. Not sure if I am not chasing soon enough or what. But I did have more success pulling away to the 12 o clock after 2 full trucks beyond my space. Is there anything wrong with that?

I apologize if these are absurdly rookie questions. But I am trying to be successful.

That said, my trainer feels great about passing me and recommending me to my own truck.

Cheers and thanks all!

Major KUDOS, mi mano!!

Wish my other half was home, but he isn't yet. Shift 2.5 literally. We've posted elsewhere, that a 13 (even an 18) is easier to split.

I'm so happy for you, hoping for the VETS of this site, and the wheel(s) to chime in soon.. wish I had more!

~ Anne ~

(No Tom atm.. sorry!)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Floating gears makes you belong in this industry? confused.gif

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Drew D.'s Comment
member avatar

Both my CDL school and my company are pro-float. This is how I was taught to drive from two separate entities. Everyone I have come into contact with thinks double clutching is a waste. Besides, I will end up in an automatic next week anyway. I never understood why people are so passionate about shifting styles. If the truck moves and stops in gear, who cares how its done?

Floating gears makes you belong in this industry? confused.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Floating gears makes you belong in this industry? confused.gif

No, but somehow 'splitting' does.... LoL! Dang them 'duckbills!'

I'd take a 13 over a super 10 anyday. Somebody had an EXCELLENT pic of such; let me see if I can find it. . .

No luck yet.

Dang. Sure can't find it!!

Kevin, maybe?

~ Anne ~

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Drew D.'s Comment
member avatar

I love my 13 that I'm training on. It is alot more fluid than the 10 I went to school with.

double-quotes-start.png

Floating gears makes you belong in this industry? confused.gif

double-quotes-end.png

No, but somehow 'splitting' does.... LoL! Dang them 'duckbills!'

I'd take a 13 over a super 10 anyday. Somebody had an EXCELLENT pic of such; let me see if I can find it. . .

No luck yet.

Dang. Sure can't find it!!

Kevin, maybe?

~ Anne ~

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Both my CDL school and my company are pro-float. This is how I was taught to drive from two separate entities. Everyone I have come into contact with thinks double clutching is a waste. Besides, I will end up in an automatic next week anyway. I never understood why people are so passionate about shifting styles. If the truck moves and stops in gear, who cares how its done?

double-quotes-start.png

Floating gears makes you belong in this industry? confused.gif

double-quotes-end.png

Spot on, good sir. I just wish my hubby wouldn't 'float' my 5'speed JEEP on his off days, haha! rofl-3.gif

Sure can't find that diagram I'd hoped to.

May I (we) ask, who you eventually went with, to train & drive for? If you mentioned it, I'd missed it.

Thanks, man.

Happy for ya!

~ Anne ~

ps: The 'E' restriction is no biggie, just at my husband's company, everytime somebody has a 'breakdown' of the 'tractor,' they put HIM in the Int'l or a Mack 10'er. . . . because so many folks are 'auto only' nowadays!

Kudos to you, for keeping that 'restriction' off your DL. I did, as well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

My apologies for being a smart$&&. Best of luck. Who do you drive for? Most companies are automatic.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I generally find that if I'm too close on the drivers side at the hole that I've either started too late or pulled too forward during the return to 12. But, I think it's normal to come in close on that, after all, it's the side we see and is easier to correct. I find I can correct it by getting under it sooner and making micro adjustments to the arc.

I do really goofy 90s a lot. I put a very slight angle, like 5 degrees and pull way past my spot. So the tail is about 3 or 4 spots past it, then I just back straight or put a tiny bit of English on the tractor and adjust my arc as it naturally progressively turns. It takes up very little space in front that way. But if I'm too close to the hole on the drivers side like a setup for a conventional 90, the tail will take up two spots with out swing.

Idk, my goofy backing works for me but it might be disaster for another person.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

The floating gears thing is more personal preference than anything else in my opinion. Several factors go into it. Load weight and terrain being the biggies. It doesn’t matter on the splitting part except the rpm differences. I have never heard of a cdl school actually teaching it, because you can’t do it for the state cdl exam. The company yout with probably thinks they are saving money on clutches. Either way, while your on a trainers truck his is the final rule unless it is illegal or unsafe.

Backing I’m assuming your driving a standard refer trailer and not a spread axle. Where are your tandems set?? makes a big difference on the reaction and speed on steering input. The further up they are the quicker it pivots and reacts overall. Backing is always a challenge for me, espically when I’m tired. Do what feels right for you. You have the foundation of the mechanics but sometimes we find little things that help us just a bit. All trucks and trailers, and the combination are different, that just takes practice. Any 90 get a little angle in the trailer toward the hole on setup will make it easier.

Anytime your backing fold the tail in before you start. Those things are a pain. Fold it down and you don’t have to worry about swing or how far your in the space. Bumping anything in my opinion is not acceptable.

The only stupid question is the one not asked.

Best wishes for your new journey.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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