Demoted After 3 Preventable Accidents.

Topic 31973 | Page 1

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Andrew99's Comment
member avatar

So I’m 22 and I work for a trash company( Rear loader). I became a driver in December. Was only training 2 weeks. And my trainer said I was good to go. My first day by myself with my first labor I backed into a light post where I was servicing townhouses. Got 1 day suspended. About 2 months later I hit a car while I was waiting for a red light and when it turned green I didn’t check my mirror to see a car was next me (she thought I was parked so she just waiting in my blind spot but if I checked better I would’ve saw it.) so boom. Got 1 day suspended. 3rd one was A couple days ago. Probably to noobest mistake you’ve seen if you saw the video. I was turning around in a culdesac (So much room to do this) and I just was working in such a rush (even tho this was Friday and by This time in the week I was already at 65 hours so I was TIRED and frustrated about something personal . but I’m a G I don’t drink coffee or anything so I just pushed myself even tho so many signs to slow down cause safety needs to be a priority) Anyways. I got way to close a car and when I pulled up to then reverse to turn around I clipped the car with my driver front side bumper. Every time I f’d up I took full responsibility and was sincere. so that on top of me being one of the best(fastest) workers around is why I believe instead of firing me they offered to let me step down back to labor (I was a labor for 3 years before becoming a driver) and in 6 months when the first accident falls off 1 year he would put me back in the driver seat. So now that I’ve explained my driving accident history as a cdl I would like to ask you experienced drivers how bad are these accidents? Would I be a fool to consider not staying? how this affects my hire ability in general?/Would other potential jobs see this history and where would they see this? Any advice for when I get back into the driver seat? Im not the personality to doubt myself but facts are facts and not been doing pretty.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Andrew99 ~

Howdy, and welcome to the forum!

My other half had his OWN trash route and truck/vactor roll off, at the age of 17; regulation wasn't a thing back then.

Neither here nor there; I'll let the vets and the pro's chime in here, but ... parroting what I'm expecting them to say, is ... STAY.

So, you step down to a laborer for a little minute. If you're not fired, you're good! Three preventables in such a short term is not going to make you very hireable, elsewhere; if anywhere.

You've admitted your mistakes, and admonished yourself. Step one is in the books. Step two, is .. stay put; learn, and hopefully they won't DAC you with these incidents.

Yes, IMHO, you'd be a 'dork' NOT to stay. From a 20 year trucker's wife; and he's sitting behind me, saying YEOP!

They may even compensate you, by keeping this OFF your future record.

Hope this helps;

~ Anne & Tom ~

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Not too sure now days, but back in the day I worked for Waste Management as a diesel tech for a bunch of years ('83-'90), I don't think they reported such things to anyone externally. But 40 years later, surely some things have changed.... BUT refuse is not the same as OTR , otherwise, I think if it was anything to report to DAC. Their insurance company would've probably already had you fired period, by accident #2

Maybe, try asking some 1 there in charge of things, that question, RE: DAC reporting. Get it right from the horses mouth, if they even do that or not.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow'! Not sure what to say. You admitted your mistakes. But.....young skywalker, relax dont get ****y. Prove yourself so you can get back in the truck. Offer to go w trainer if necessary. When you do get back in truck. Focus on the truck and job at hand. In turning, backing., and tight situations pay attention to the immediate leave your personal issues at home. Best of luck my good man! God bless!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

First off…RESPECT man. You made mistakes and you owned up to them. If you hadn’t done that I doubt they would’ve kept you on.

To answer your question, I don’t know if they report it on your DAC or not. Probably depends on what company you drive for. You certainly could look around for other driving jobs if you want. My advice to you as someone who has made mistakes as well in this industry and been in it for a few years: I would recommend staying with the company and holding out until they let you start driving again in a year. First, they’ve shown you loyalty by keeping you on. If you start looking around and they find out (which they most likely will because of the way driving companies vet potential new hires) they may decide to let you go and you could be stuck with no current job and a bunch of closed doors for other driving jobs. Second, you’re already with a company that is willing to give you another go once some time elapses (probably an insurance thing). If you do find another job right away and you make any more mistakes like this you could blacklist yourself from any good driving jobs for a while anyway. Third, my guess is they do report is and most companies won’t hire you at this time anyways.

As far as the driving goes, just gotta commit to not being in a hurry and just watching everything all the time. A couple “slogans” if you will that stick with me.

“Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.” “Keep your head on a swivel” And not really a slogan but for me “don’t ever be in a hurry”

And my personal favorite I tell myself all the time because I’m prone to do stupid things…”don’t be stupid” haha

Good luck whatever you decide and thanks for owning up

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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