Volvo VNL 760 Or Freightliner Cascadia

Topic 32081 | Page 1

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Bill M.'s Comment
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A sad day last Tuesday as I returned my Volvo VNL 760 (Roxie) to our corporate office in Marinette, WI. Roxie had only 193,000 miles. Veriha has an entertainment fleet of trucks, most are white Volvos, which mine was. There are a limited number of these trucks in the fleet. With the entertainment fleet expanding, the long lead times on new trucks, and me not interested in running in the entertainment fleet, I had to swap trucks.

My new to me truck is a 2019 Freightliner Cascadia with over 444,000 miles. Nothing wrong with that. My take on trucks is that I'll drive it as as long as it is in safe operational condition and can pull a trailer. But there are a few things about the Volvo that I prefer over the freightliner. Roxie had an inverter, refrigerator, microwave and was governed at 70 mph. I rarely drove 70 MPH unless I wanted to pass someone or had to make time, and I only traveled 70 MPH in a 70 zone. Most of the time I drove about 67 MPH in the 70 MPH - I'm not a fan exceeding the recommended speed but will travel about 2 mph over from time-to-time - l know a lot of truckers don't appreciate that. I had a driver berating me on the CB for traveling 57 in 55. I didn't say a word back to him. I just kept driving.

Anyway, the Freightliner is governed at 65 MPH and doesn't have an inverter. However, it has far more storage space and the air conditioner is far superior to the Volvo. It seems to be a smoother and quieter ride but the acceleration and hill climbing power are not nearly as good as the Volvo - because of this I've reduced the max speed on my GPS by 4 MPH to ensure a more accurate estimated time of travel when trip planning.

To be honest, I became attached and still have some separation anxiety. Moving forward, I won't be naming this truck or any other truck for that matter, unless I someday go the owner operator route - but I'm not interested at all in doing that. So, this truck will be known for what it is - truck 1215.

Anybody else have experience with both trucks? What's your take?

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Just from what I've driven I'll take Freightliners any day of the week and twice on Sundays. I've driven a Freightliner with almost a million miles and you wouldn't know it. Meanwhile the Volvo with half that felt like I was crossing the plains in a covered wagon. The KWs feel too cramped inside for my liking as well.

Of course this is with day cabs, sleepers are a bit different.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Covered Wagon:

A flatbed with specially fitted side plates and curved ribs supporting a tarp covering, commonly referred to as a "side kit". Named for the resemblance to horse-drawn covered wagons.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PackRat's Comment
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No names? Hogwash! I've named all of mine in alphabetical order. I'm up to "J" now, and the current model is "Jonesy".

FL dealerships are much more common than that Volvo you had.

As far as the climbing and speeds, that will all depend on the way Veriha ordered them spec'd.

Klutch's Comment
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Got a brand new 22 Cascadia not too long ago. I really liked the INTL I was in prior but man I’ve grown to love the Freightliner.

That sucks yours doesn’t have an inverter, the 2018/2019s in our fleet have them under the bed. Im sure you’ve checked there but a buddy of mine didn’t realize he had one for quite a while.

Mine is governed at 65 as well, climbs well as long as I’m hauling under 20k. A few days ago on 64w in WV I struggled to stay above 25mph on some of the hills with 44k. Pretty rough.

Chris W.'s Comment
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Haven't drove a Volvo but I like the Cascadias so I would probably prefer the Cascadia. The one I am driving has 350,584 miles and runs like a charm.

BK's Comment
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As has already been mentioned, it would really suck not to have an inverter. Once you have one, it’s hard to do without it.

Bill M.'s Comment
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I hear ya! I'm torn about naming my truck. For now, it's truck 1215! Jonesy is a good name. Reminds me of an old Clint Eastwood movie!

No names? Hogwash! I've named all of mine in alphabetical order. I'm up to "J" now, and the current model is "Jonesy".

FL dealerships are much more common than that Volvo you had.

As far as the climbing and speeds, that will all depend on the way Veriha ordered them spec'd.

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh ya. WV will throw some hills at you. LOL.

Veriha hauls a lot of heavy cargo. My average during the week is about 42,000 lbs. For a bout two straight weeks I hauled 78,000+ gross on a daily basis and I haul a lot through upstate New York, central and eastern PA.

No inverter in this truck, believe me...I checked. Not willing to invest in one at this point so it's a high sodium diet for this guy over the next several months. rofl-3.gif

Got a brand new 22 Cascadia not too long ago. I really liked the INTL I was in prior but man I’ve grown to love the Freightliner.

That sucks yours doesn’t have an inverter, the 2018/2019s in our fleet have them under the bed. Im sure you’ve checked there but a buddy of mine didn’t realize he had one for quite a while.

Mine is governed at 65 as well, climbs well as long as I’m hauling under 20k. A few days ago on 64w in WV I struggled to stay above 25mph on some of the hills with 44k. Pretty rough.

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh BK, I am feeling it in a big way. embarrassed.gif You're talking to a guy who cooks everything from scratch and only dines out once in a while. I'll make it work though!

As has already been mentioned, it would really suck not to have an inverter. Once you have one, it’s hard to do without it.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
No inverter in this truck, believe me...I checked.

You could ask for one to be installed. A quick message to your dispatcher wouldn't hurt worse they say is no.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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