Keim CDL Training "BREAKER BREAKER" Experience

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Josh D.'s Comment
member avatar

So I stumbled across Keim on the web somehow while trying to find a regional truckering company that preferable ran flatbed who offered paid, or at least free, training. I was basically all set to go with TMC, but something was niggling at the back of my mind. I found Keim, and honestly couldn't find much about them online other than what's on their website. Youtube videos from TMC are a dime a dozen, but Keim is smaller and doesn't have that kind of presence. Here's what I know so far. Get your CDLP. Show up at their office in Wellsville. Get paid $25/day during initial training. (Basically pays for dinner and maybe gas to get to training. They cover hotel (you get your own room, no sharing) and lunch. So definitely skimpy compared to most other training offers. The huge offset for me personally is being only 2 hours away from the training facility and (as opposed to TMC) you get the weekends off. 3 weeks (approximately) until you get tested out for your CDL. In addition to not sharing a room, you may not even share a classroom! She said it's often only one or two students going through at a time. Small company = lots of individual attention.

Then another three weeks (approximately) driving with a trainer who should be from your area so you're home on weekends when he/she is. This stage of the training pays $125/day. Which is actually higher than TMC which pays a flat $500/week through the entire training experience. Once you get your own truck you can pick 25percent OR .58/mile. Which honestly sounds high to me? Recruiter said average miles for a new person are 2200/2800 a week. so that .58 would stack up quickly.

I've got my testing date for my CDLP set for a week from now. I'm going to do my best to test out for as many 'extras' as I can. The one I probably won't make is the hazard, as I simply can't get the background check stuff done fast enough to be done before the permit.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I'll be following, Josh!

Even though I found them first, haha! Please tell Casey (female Recruiting Mgr.) that Brett & Anne said hi & that you're a member here!

~ Anne ~

good-luck.gif good-luck-2.gif good-luck.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Good luck! Keep us posted! Niggling?? confused.gif

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

So I stumbled across Keim on the web somehow while trying to find a regional truckering company that preferable ran flatbed who offered paid, or at least free, training. I was basically all set to go with TMC, but something was niggling at the back of my mind. I found Keim, and honestly couldn't find much about them online other than what's on their website. Youtube videos from TMC are a dime a dozen, but Keim is smaller and doesn't have that kind of presence. Here's what I know so far. Get your CDLP. Show up at their office in Wellsville. Get paid $25/day during initial training. (Basically pays for dinner and maybe gas to get to training. They cover hotel (you get your own room, no sharing) and lunch. So definitely skimpy compared to most other training offers. The huge offset for me personally is being only 2 hours away from the training facility and (as opposed to TMC) you get the weekends off. 3 weeks (approximately) until you get tested out for your CDL. In addition to not sharing a room, you may not even share a classroom! She said it's often only one or two students going through at a time. Small company = lots of individual attention.

Then another three weeks (approximately) driving with a trainer who should be from your area so you're home on weekends when he/she is. This stage of the training pays $125/day. Which is actually higher than TMC which pays a flat $500/week through the entire training experience. Once you get your own truck you can pick 25percent OR .58/mile. Which honestly sounds high to me? Recruiter said average miles for a new person are 2200/2800 a week. so that .58 would stack up quickly.

I've got my testing date for my CDLP set for a week from now. I'm going to do my best to test out for as many 'extras' as I can. The one I probably won't make is the hazard, as I simply can't get the background check stuff done fast enough to be done before the permit.

I am skeptical of $.58/mile coming right out of school. That honestly sounds like "up to $.58/mile" after bonuses. The problem with numbers like that is you are not going to maximize bonuses for the first year. The first three months solo you may not hit a bonus as you learn shippers, receivers, paperwork, etc. The next three months, you will likely hit some bonuses, but not all. By the end of the first year, you will probably be hitting the majority of bonuses. Even then, there will be plenty of room for improvement.

Recruiters like to make pay seem like it's more than what it actually is, sometimes. I would ask if $.58/mile is base pay or maximum per mile rate after bonuses are calculated. For a driver right out of school, I would be expecting the per mile rate to be $.50, possibly as low as $.47.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Josh D.'s Comment
member avatar

Good luck! Keep us posted! Niggling?? confused.gif

I'm a Political Science major in a former life... my writing might be a little over the top without meaning to be.

Josh D.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So I stumbled across Keim on the web somehow while trying to find a regional truckering company that preferable ran flatbed who offered paid, or at least free, training. I was basically all set to go with TMC, but something was niggling at the back of my mind. I found Keim, and honestly couldn't find much about them online other than what's on their website. Youtube videos from TMC are a dime a dozen, but Keim is smaller and doesn't have that kind of presence. Here's what I know so far. Get your CDLP. Show up at their office in Wellsville. Get paid $25/day during initial training. (Basically pays for dinner and maybe gas to get to training. They cover hotel (you get your own room, no sharing) and lunch. So definitely skimpy compared to most other training offers. The huge offset for me personally is being only 2 hours away from the training facility and (as opposed to TMC) you get the weekends off. 3 weeks (approximately) until you get tested out for your CDL. In addition to not sharing a room, you may not even share a classroom! She said it's often only one or two students going through at a time. Small company = lots of individual attention.

Then another three weeks (approximately) driving with a trainer who should be from your area so you're home on weekends when he/she is. This stage of the training pays $125/day. Which is actually higher than TMC which pays a flat $500/week through the entire training experience. Once you get your own truck you can pick 25percent OR .58/mile. Which honestly sounds high to me? Recruiter said average miles for a new person are 2200/2800 a week. so that .58 would stack up quickly.

I've got my testing date for my CDLP set for a week from now. I'm going to do my best to test out for as many 'extras' as I can. The one I probably won't make is the hazard, as I simply can't get the background check stuff done fast enough to be done before the permit.

double-quotes-end.png

I am skeptical of $.58/mile coming right out of school. That honestly sounds like "up to $.58/mile" after bonuses. The problem with numbers like that is you are not going to maximize bonuses for the first year. The first three months solo you may not hit a bonus as you learn shippers, receivers, paperwork, etc. The next three months, you will likely hit some bonuses, but not all. By the end of the first year, you will probably be hitting the majority of bonuses. Even then, there will be plenty of room for improvement.

Recruiters like to make pay seem like it's more than what it actually is, sometimes. I would ask if $.58/mile is base pay or maximum per mile rate after bonuses are calculated. For a driver right out of school, I would be expecting the per mile rate to be $.50, possibly as low as $.47.

Great Question, thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Josh D.'s Comment
member avatar

So My permit test is scheduled for Thursday. There was a little drama so far with the endorsements. I was told here by someone to add them to my permit so they'll get on my license. The recruiter told me the law changed and now you have to show that you were trained by a school in the particular endorsement you want before you can test for it. I read EVERYTHING I could find on the Kansas CDL website and this is what I came up with. New drivers cannot test for their license without showing having passed an accredited (my wording) school. They also specifically mentioned the hazmat endorsement. They did not mention any of the others. At first I was going to only get what I had to get - air brakes and combination - but after looking over the practice tests on THIS app... https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.jeffreydiaz.android.app.cdlprep&gl=US (there is an iphone version too) I realized that the tanker and double's / Tripples endorsements would be a fairly easy add on - even if I'm wrong and I won't ultimately get them. So I'm gonna go ahead and take those if I can and see what shakes out. I'll make sure to report on the final result!

I contacted Keim and assuming I pass - I'll start training the 22nd (the following Monday). Training details and what the company is like to follow! I say IF I pass because the TMC recruiter told me that 85% fail first time...??? That sounds crazy high to me. I've always been a good test taker, but we'll see.

Oh. By the way. After emailing the TMC recruiter that I was going with a different opportunity I got a call and multiple texts and automated emails. Odd business practice to spam someone who's said no thank you. Doesn't seem like a great way to build good will if you hope to potentially employ them in the future as I know turnover in this industry is crazy high.

Side note - if anyone reading this has any experience with through the house or home every night routes/companies in the Springfield Missouri area - I'd love to hear about them! I don't think I'll be able to stay with Keim long-term as they don't do dedicated and the best I can do with them is home weekends. I'm very willing to do this to get in the door - but ultimately need to be more available to my family.

Oh another note on Keim. The recruiter noted that with TMC if you leave before your year is up you owe major $$$ for the schooling they put you through. She said that it happened to someone who came to work with them after leaving TMC early. She said they don't do that, and that they do ask you to put in a year, but if something happens and you have to jump ship early, Keim doesn't come after you for any school costs.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

The only endorsement that you need specialized additional training for is HAZMAT. The law changed recently and all new endorsements for this require a separate course completion before testing at the DMV. TWIC seems to vary by state.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Josh D.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So I stumbled across Keim on the web somehow while trying to find a regional truckering company that preferable ran flatbed who offered paid, or at least free, training. I was basically all set to go with TMC, but something was niggling at the back of my mind. I found Keim, and honestly couldn't find much about them online other than what's on their website. Youtube videos from TMC are a dime a dozen, but Keim is smaller and doesn't have that kind of presence. Here's what I know so far. Get your CDLP. Show up at their office in Wellsville. Get paid $25/day during initial training. (Basically pays for dinner and maybe gas to get to training. They cover hotel (you get your own room, no sharing) and lunch. So definitely skimpy compared to most other training offers. The huge offset for me personally is being only 2 hours away from the training facility and (as opposed to TMC) you get the weekends off. 3 weeks (approximately) until you get tested out for your CDL. In addition to not sharing a room, you may not even share a classroom! She said it's often only one or two students going through at a time. Small company = lots of individual attention.

Then another three weeks (approximately) driving with a trainer who should be from your area so you're home on weekends when he/she is. This stage of the training pays $125/day. Which is actually higher than TMC which pays a flat $500/week through the entire training experience. Once you get your own truck you can pick 25percent OR .58/mile. Which honestly sounds high to me? Recruiter said average miles for a new person are 2200/2800 a week. so that .58 would stack up quickly.

I've got my testing date for my CDLP set for a week from now. I'm going to do my best to test out for as many 'extras' as I can. The one I probably won't make is the hazard, as I simply can't get the background check stuff done fast enough to be done before the permit.

double-quotes-end.png

I am skeptical of $.58/mile coming right out of school. That honestly sounds like "up to $.58/mile" after bonuses. The problem with numbers like that is you are not going to maximize bonuses for the first year. The first three months solo you may not hit a bonus as you learn shippers, receivers, paperwork, etc. The next three months, you will likely hit some bonuses, but not all. By the end of the first year, you will probably be hitting the majority of bonuses. Even then, there will be plenty of room for improvement.

Recruiters like to make pay seem like it's more than what it actually is, sometimes. I would ask if $.58/mile is base pay or maximum per mile rate after bonuses are calculated. For a driver right out of school, I would be expecting the per mile rate to be $.50, possibly as low as $.47.

So I confirmed with Casey (the lady that answers the phone if you press "interested in a career" on their phone tree. I asked if .58 cents was the flat rate, or if it included bonuses. She said that it was BEFORE any bonuses. You can choose 25% or .58 cents to start with. They do not vary the percent month to month like TMC. Instead it increases more like a salary would. Goes up after your first year and so on. I asked if the majority of the drivers go with one or the other and she said its pretty much down the middle. I'll report more once I'm actually driving. I'll pick percentage to start, and then at 90 days I'll get a chance to change if I want to. Then I'm locked in until my first year marker. From the bit of Keim talk on youtube, sounds like the percent is good if your close to a terminal and getting higher paying loads. If you're a little more out in the sticks and have loads that aren't as lucrative, the mileage can work out better. They also have tarping AND untarping pay, pay for sitting around at construction sites, etc. Basically if they charge the customer extra for something, you get a part of it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Josh D.'s Comment
member avatar

The only endorsement that you need specialized additional training for is HAZMAT. The law changed recently and all new endorsements for this require a separate course completion before testing at the DMV. TWIC seems to vary by state.

This is what I eventually discovered. Although when I showed up at the DMV here in Kansas, I was told that I couldn't do doubles/triples either. Something about that not being allowed on the permit. Maybe that's just Kansas? I don't know. So the only 'extra' besides combination and airbrakes I was able to add was Tanker.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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