Hey Anna A.!

Topic 32243 | Page 5

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Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Keep in mind, Pitt-Ohio has a large fleet B class trucks. I would imagine most of their P&D is done by them. On the flip side, I’m currently running P&D with a 53 in New Castle DE. I basically bounce from one industrial park to another. 95% of my stops are docks. The ones without docks have forklifts, I move the pallet to rear of trailer with pallet jack and the customer scoops it off.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
The Pitt Ohio M/O confuses me, in that ... if the Job Tom is looking at IS IN FACT true linehaul , as they say, who then DOES the P&D stuff, and how .. in a 53' van

They will have city drivers (P&D) who will handle all the P&D stuff. When they come back dock workers will then strip the trailer and reload everything onto trailers to be sent to its final destination. It is kinda like how OD and FXF do it, just they use 53s instead of pups.

They might have "Combo" drivers, which would involve doing some P&D work in the early in the day then doing a short linehaul later in the day. Or one day he could be all P&D and next linehaul.

I'm kinda just taking a educated guess how they work, as Pitt Ohio is not that big out here so I'm not familiar with their operation.

The benefits are much better than we'd had; that matters, too. Is that common in the LTL world? WMPF is right up there, though.. with bennies

For most part from what I remember seeing yes, LTL companies usually offer better benefits than OTR. I know mine now are far better than at Westside.

As a side note the Pitt Ohio site kinda sucks.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
I would imagine most of their P&D is done by them. On the flip side, I’m currently running P&D with a 53 in New Castle DE

OD uses pretty much all 53s for P&D unless it won't fit. Also if we get a pup that has freight all going to the same customer they will run it over on that instead of emptying it.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Per the other thread road drivers are linehaul drivers just a different name.

OD lists having to touch freight, in my 5 years ( today) I still haven't. But that will depend on the company and by the terminal.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

2K a week sounds about right. With pay for drops hooks and fueling, he'd be looking at around 1700 a week, gross.

Pitt doesn't have combo drivers, their system wouldn't allow for it.

Like bobcat and Dave said, 53 is just the medium they choose to use. Don't get to hung up on that, everything else is the same as every other LTL carrier .

As for benefits, in LTL the best would be yellow and ABF. T FORCE would be third, Pitt fifth and everyone else is pretty similar and tied for sixth.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

There are times when you'd have to wait on freight, but it's not crazy. Most linehaul nights average 10 hours. Buildings are in a rush to get the freight out so it's delivered on time.

You don't get paid delay pay for waiting at a center for your trailers to be closed. You get paid your hourly rate after 30 minutes if your relay meet driver is late. However, if you leave at 8 and you're not due to leave until 10 you don't get paid because you left early. Breakdowns are also paid at your hourly rate for the entire time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Don's Comment
member avatar

"ps: DON? Cali bound, or WST ?"

Hey Anne

I will be going with WST. I'll give it a whirl and see how it goes.

How about Tom?

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

"ps: DON? Cali bound, or WST ?"

Hey Anne

I will be going with WST. I'll give it a whirl and see how it goes.

How about Tom?

Glad to hear back, Don! We are happy for you, and think it's the best; honestly.

Tom's thinking of 'flailing' / aka: going back to 'days of yore' .. LoL ! So much on the table, with his experience.

WST is HUGELY in the loop, THANKS to you !! ..... and thanks to these wonderful LTL guys, so is Pitt Ohio. Banks & the LTL gang have really opened my/our eyes to comprehension of the whole kit & kaboodle. (It's not far, so still a huge option, they have RED Macks! ;) )

Kristopher Gordon at WST is awesome..and Wooster isn't farther than Mt. Vernon, by much. Cowan, the Perrysville guys are interested; they were Tom's pals in school, but who knows; small didn't go far with our FAB prior, haha! Same with NextGen in Lexington... smallsmallsmall. They do jockeys with tanks & flats to the rails / CSX.

WMPF ~ Turtle is the man! Grove City isn't looking 4 anyone anymore, WCH is 1.17 hours... auugh! Still, thought processes. We applied, anyhow. I'm sure they'd hire folks closer, so... I'll just leave him on the waiting list.

Marten . . has a WM dedicated; spoke with them quite a bit, as well.. waiting for more info from them, as it's new and they're not really consistent with information, haha! Oh, and....it's a WM dedicated out of CMH!

Truck One, not so. Mark Tremains HATES me, so... even if he wanted to .. guess I off'ed that! Did you ever even LOOK ???? And then again, there's Tanks . . . hmmmm.. after an hour on the phone w/PJ (God Bless ya!) and AndHe78(Godblessu2!) . . last week, as much as Tom 'thinks' he wants to be a tanker yanker again.... I'm wondering if he has it in him, yet. The 'tri domes' and tri/quad tandems (jeep/dolly) w/Crossett . . . thinking Tom has aged out of . It'd be fun, for a month, if even!

We have three tanker companies interested, but ... I'm not sure. ( For his sake, to be honest. )

Glad you decided, Don. It might just be that YOU'LL be hosting Tom these days soon...who knows? Give him a shout, via text. Be appreciated.

~ Anne (& Tom) ~

There are times when you'd have to wait on freight, but it's not crazy. Most linehaul nights average 10 hours. Buildings are in a rush to get the freight out so it's delivered on time.

You don't get paid delay pay for waiting at a center for your trailers to be closed. You get paid your hourly rate after 30 minutes if your relay meet driver is late. However, if you leave at 8 and you're not due to leave until 10 you don't get paid because you left early. Breakdowns are also paid at your hourly rate for the entire time.

There are times when you'd have to wait on freight, but it's not crazy. Most linehaul nights average 10 hours. Buildings are in a rush to get the freight out so it's delivered on time.

You don't get paid delay pay for waiting at a center for your trailers to be closed. You get paid your hourly rate after 30 minutes if your relay meet driver is late. However, if you leave at 8 and you're not due to leave until 10 you don't get paid because you left early. Breakdowns are also paid at your hourly rate for the entire time.

2K a week sounds about right. With pay for drops hooks and fueling, he'd be looking at around 1700 a week, gross.

Pitt doesn't have combo drivers, their system wouldn't allow for it.

Like bobcat and Dave said, 53 is just the medium they choose to use. Don't get to hung up on that, everything else is the same as every other LTL carrier .

As for benefits, in LTL the best would be yellow and ABF. T FORCE would be third, Pitt fifth and everyone else is pretty similar and tied for sixth.

Banks, we owe you, BobcatBob, DelcoDave, etc.. so many times nine AND tenfold! Still pondering the bounce to LTL . . . and/or tanks.

Email in profi, jsyk! It's seriously getting down to the wire. WST is a decent(ish) deal. Tanks, I just don't know. 19 years in; he doesn't need to show off anymore. That's a tough one, y'all... more on that later

BANKS, Thanks tons, man. Always.

ALL you people .. tysm!

~ Anne & Tom ~

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

No problemo. Let me know if you need any more info.

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