Knight Drivers - How Do You Like It?

Topic 32318 | Page 2

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The Pelican's Comment
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Anxiety is my middle name

Pelican, you seem to worried about way too many non-issues. You're worried about steps 54, 68, and 93 when you need to concentrate on the now, then the tomorrow.

Internet reviews? Seriously? A complete waste of your time. This site is the single, best source.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
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Anne you always link me to the best resources. You've done this better than anyone here. Thanks for that.

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Knight Transportation's Glass door says:

"Knight Transportation drivers don't drive long hours into the night. The truckload carrier instead focuses on short- to medium-haul trips, averaging about 500 miles."

I was reading somewhere on here someone said they work for Knight.

Do you only average 500 miles a week? What do you think it means that drivers do not drive into the night? Do you all mainly drive in the southwest? Does knight hire CDL school grads? How's the pay?

Thanks for any info!

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Hey, Pelican~!

Davy A. and TwoSides11 are a couple recent grads of Knight, as well:

TwoSides11's 'follow up' diary, flatbed: First Year Solo, Knight Flatbed.

Davy A.'s beginning, March 2021: Davy A.'s Knight Transportation Squire Training.

As Kearsey/Rainy stated, Old School sure IS the Knight Squire Master, the guys above followed his lead successfully.

Best always;

~ Anne ~

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Pelican,

You (and everyone I try to help!) are most welcome. It's all I can do, being sidelined from passing the DOT physical, until my rotator cuff heals. I've been a trucker's wife since '03, two tours on a CDLP, and I'm on my second membership on TT.. the aol.com address didn't hold salt. (Nor pepper!)

The info, intel, and interaction you receive here is awesome... heed the professionals, as they share above!!

Always, just the 'nerd/mom' on TT;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I've driven for Knight for a little over a year and a half. I thoroughly detailed my experience from beginning through training and my solo training miles. Feel free to have a read in the diaries section.

I've had tremendous success at Knight and although I have complaints at times, its usually my attitude that's the problem.

I average 3000 miles plus a week as well and choose to frequently drive nights as it fits to my natural body clock and sleep cycles. My DM is aware of that and schedules loads accordingly if possible but it's also well known that I'll run what they need me to, when they need me to and figure out solutions to make it work.

As for 500 mile loads, I make more money in shorter loads. I'd be perfectly happy to do 6 500 mile loads for a week. But it rarely works out like that. I've had everything from a couple 1.5 mile loads that paid 250.00 each to a 3100 mile load in a week. I've sat for 6 days on a 390 mile load due to weather and ive had severalback to back, one never knows.

I've experienced very positive and professional relationships with my office staff and other terminals as well.

I think there's a very high level of autonomy in the industry as a whole. If you're capable of making and executing sound decisions with communication to your DM, you'll find success at any company.

Again, from my perspective, I've been very happy with my relationship with Knight. There are trade offs with any company. Strengths and weaknesses that work for some, not for others.

For me personally, Knight let's me do my job with minimal oversight and direction. I'm given a lot of latitude in scheduling. Load selection, time off, and operating area. In turn, I offer to take loads that others balk at, shuttle local stuff when I can, I never complain about empties, I am patient and professional in dealing with delays and issues and I'm proactive in finding solutions to problems. I also thrive in what others find as chaos. I'll find a path through it.

I have found Knight to consistently bend over backwards to accommodate me and I frequently recieve much more than adequate compensation for breakdown, weather delays, shipper and consignee delays etc.

As was said, I wouldn't put too much, if any stock in internet reviews. I'd heavily invest in reading the cdl diaries here and investigate this site. There is a wealth of knowledge here. Much more than the company name on your truck, is how you perform that makes a difference. Knight is a large company with many divisions that all offer different pay ranges and opportunities.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Pelican, you seem to worried about way too many non-issues. You're worried about steps 54, 68, and 93 when you need to concentrate on the now, then the tomorrow.

Internet reviews? Seriously? A complete waste of your time. This site is the single, best source.

Pelican, I totally agree with PackRat. You need to focus on stuff you can research on this site. Just get started and go step by step.

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