Knight Drivers - How Do You Like It?

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The Pelican's Comment
member avatar

Knight Transportation's Glass door says:

"Knight Transportation drivers don't drive long hours into the night. The truckload carrier instead focuses on short- to medium-haul trips, averaging about 500 miles."

I was reading somewhere on here someone said they work for Knight.

Do you only average 500 miles a week? What do you think it means that drivers do not drive into the night? Do you all mainly drive in the southwest? Does knight hire CDL school grads? How's the pay?

Thanks for any info!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Hi... This is Old Schools realm of expertise. Yes they hire new grads as well as students with permit for schooling. I think they call it the Squire program..get it ..Knight and squire 😆

They have different divisions so dry van for example will drive more days...but I doubt any reefer company could ensure you drive days due to the weird operation times of the customers.

They said the trip last 500 miles... Which is basically a drive shift.

Knight has terminal in the Northeast, Carlisle PA for sure so, no. They aren't just southwest

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

The Pelican's Comment
member avatar

Thanks! Super helpful.

Hi... This is Old Schools realm of expertise. Yes they hire new grads as well as students with permit for schooling. I think they call it the Squire program..get it ..Knight and squire 😆

They have different divisions so dry van for example will drive more days...but I doubt any reefer company could ensure you drive days due to the weird operation times of the customers.

They said the trip last 500 miles... Which is basically a drive shift.

Knight has terminal in the Northeast, Carlisle PA for sure so, no. They aren't just southwest

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Knight Transportation's Glass door says:

"Knight Transportation drivers don't drive long hours into the night. The truckload carrier instead focuses on short- to medium-haul trips, averaging about 500 miles."

I was reading somewhere on here someone said they work for Knight.

Do you only average 500 miles a week? What do you think it means that drivers do not drive into the night? Do you all mainly drive in the southwest? Does knight hire CDL school grads? How's the pay?

Thanks for any info!

Hey, Pelican~!

Davy A. and TwoSides11 are a couple recent grads of Knight, as well:

TwoSides11's 'follow up' diary, flatbed: First Year Solo, Knight Flatbed.

Davy A.'s beginning, March 2021: Davy A.'s Knight Transportation Squire Training.

As Kearsey/Rainy stated, Old School sure IS the Knight Squire Master, the guys above followed his lead successfully.

Best always;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Driving for Knight has been a great experience for me. Next year I will reach my million miler driver status with them. If all continues as it is, that will be accomplished with the same dispatcher and on the same account I got hired for.

The company has a very solid balance sheet, and is well managed. I like the way they do things. They are solid and in this game for the long haul.

You always have to be careful with what you read about trucking. I don't know who put that goofy stuff on Glassdoor, but that's just the problem with sites like that. You don't have anyway to know if it's accurate.

I average 3,000 miles per week. I drive all night if I want or need to. Nobody tells me how to do my job. That's the beauty of the truck driving career. The driver determines his own levels of accomplishment. Knight covers the lower 48. We certainly aren't limited to the Southwest. I've been to every state except Washington and Montana.

Knight is a huge company with many divisions and special dedicated accounts. There's something for everyone. Different accounts will be handled differently for the best service to the customer. Some accounts may be limited to the area the customer needs to cover. You just can't make blanket statements about a company this big. They offer lots of opportunities, and yes, they hire CDL school graduates.

Just to make sure I'm not making anyone nervous when I say this company is huge, I want you to realize there are a lot of people in this company that know my name. Forget about that silly idea that people love to whine and complain about. You know the "I'm just a number" excuse people give for quitting their trucking job. If you can conduct yourself in trucking as a person who knows how to get things accomplished, you'll get plenty of recognition. I've found that very true here at Knight.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
The Pelican's Comment
member avatar

Anne you always link me to the best resources. You've done this better than anyone here. Thanks for that.

double-quotes-start.png

Knight Transportation's Glass door says:

"Knight Transportation drivers don't drive long hours into the night. The truckload carrier instead focuses on short- to medium-haul trips, averaging about 500 miles."

I was reading somewhere on here someone said they work for Knight.

Do you only average 500 miles a week? What do you think it means that drivers do not drive into the night? Do you all mainly drive in the southwest? Does knight hire CDL school grads? How's the pay?

Thanks for any info!

double-quotes-end.png

Hey, Pelican~!

Davy A. and TwoSides11 are a couple recent grads of Knight, as well:

TwoSides11's 'follow up' diary, flatbed: First Year Solo, Knight Flatbed.

Davy A.'s beginning, March 2021: Davy A.'s Knight Transportation Squire Training.

As Kearsey/Rainy stated, Old School sure IS the Knight Squire Master, the guys above followed his lead successfully.

Best always;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
The Pelican's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I've read on different places that people said they've gotten horrible driver managers. I hope mine is nice, wherever I go. Thanks for the detailed comment.

Driving for Knight has been a great experience for me. Next year I will reach my million miler driver status with them. If all continues as it is, that will be accomplished with the same dispatcher and on the same account I got hired for.

The company has a very solid balance sheet, and is well managed. I like the way they do things. They are solid and in this game for the long haul.

You always have to be careful with what you read about trucking. I don't know who put that goofy stuff on Glassdoor, but that's just the problem with sites like that. You don't have anyway to know if it's accurate.

I average 3,000 miles per week. I drive all night if I want or need to. Nobody tells me how to do my job. That's the beauty of the truck driving career. The driver determines his own levels of accomplishment. Knight covers the lower 48. We certainly aren't limited to the Southwest. I've been to every state except Washington and Montana.

Knight is a huge company with many divisions and special dedicated accounts. There's something for everyone. Different accounts will be handled differently for the best service to the customer. Some accounts may be limited to the area the customer needs to cover. You just can't make blanket statements about a company this big. They offer lots of opportunities, and yes, they hire CDL school graduates.

Just to make sure I'm not making anyone nervous when I say this company is huge, I want you to realize there are a lot of people in this company that know my name. Forget about that silly idea that people love to whine and complain about. You know the "I'm just a number" excuse people give for quitting their trucking job. If you can conduct yourself in trucking as a person who knows how to get things accomplished, you'll get plenty of recognition. I've found that very true here at Knight.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Pelican, you seem to worried about way too many non-issues. You're worried about steps 54, 68, and 93 when you need to concentrate on the now, then the tomorrow.

Internet reviews? Seriously? A complete waste of your time. This site is the single, best source.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I admit I'm just a number!

Last week I was on home time in NJ despite having moved to MO last year. For the most part I have been doing CDL instruction on the pad and home daily. I took 3 trainers OTR in that time. I chose them.

While in NJ I told my fleet manager I wanted to go back to MO for CDL instruction. My FM messaged "10/4"

My brother laughed and said "You ARE just a number to your mega carrier.. your number is 10/4."

That's all my FM says to me. But ... I'm just a dumb company driver making no money and stupid. :::Heavy sarcasm:::

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Knight also has a terminal in Hutchins/Wilmer Texas, up the road from the Love's there off the Northbound I-45. And CRST had a drop yard just past Knights terminal (been there a few times) Pretty sure they (Knight) have plenty of other places eastward

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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