A Rook's Attempt At A Veriha Training Diary

Topic 32493 | Page 6

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Regardless… if Prime requires it, there is a solid reason, go get it. None of us are in a position to dissuade you from this based on semantics.

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Good update Sandman.

Prime requires the tanker endorse for all drivers because we haul liquids in the box that exceed 1,001 gallons. Think beer, juice, bottled water, etc.

My Hazmat endorsement has gotten me a couple nice loads so far plus extra $50 per load.

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Your understanding of tanker endorsement reg is incorrect.

First, it's 1000 gallons or more, not 1001 gallons. Second, the volume of individual containers matters. Fir tanker endorsement to be required, each individual container must contain at least 119 gallons. So, bottled water would not be a load requiring a tanker endorsement.

Here's a mock scenario to consider:

You have a load of various size liquid containers going to multiple stops. Your total volume is 3,500 gallons. You have 4 containers with a liquid volume of 200 gallons, 20 containers of 100 liquid gallons, and 700 containers of 1 gallon each. That's over 1000 gallons for the load and individual containers of at least 119 gallons, so tanker endorsement is required, right? False. Once unloading the smaller containers a tanker endorsement would then be required, right? False. The containers of at least 119 gallons do not total 1000 gallons. The reg states that to require a tanker endorsement, the 1000 gallons must be in one tank or distributed among multiple tanks of at least 119 gallons. So, all tanks of less than 119 gallons do not count toward the 1000 gallon requirement, per regulation.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Regardless… if Prime requires it, there is a solid reason, go get it. None of us are in a position to dissuade you from this based on semantics.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Good update Sandman.

Prime requires the tanker endorse for all drivers because we haul liquids in the box that exceed 1,001 gallons. Think beer, juice, bottled water, etc.

My Hazmat endorsement has gotten me a couple nice loads so far plus extra $50 per load.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Your understanding of tanker endorsement reg is incorrect.

First, it's 1000 gallons or more, not 1001 gallons. Second, the volume of individual containers matters. Fir tanker endorsement to be required, each individual container must contain at least 119 gallons. So, bottled water would not be a load requiring a tanker endorsement.

Here's a mock scenario to consider:

You have a load of various size liquid containers going to multiple stops. Your total volume is 3,500 gallons. You have 4 containers with a liquid volume of 200 gallons, 20 containers of 100 liquid gallons, and 700 containers of 1 gallon each. That's over 1000 gallons for the load and individual containers of at least 119 gallons, so tanker endorsement is required, right? False. Once unloading the smaller containers a tanker endorsement would then be required, right? False. The containers of at least 119 gallons do not total 1000 gallons. The reg states that to require a tanker endorsement, the 1000 gallons must be in one tank or distributed among multiple tanks of at least 119 gallons. So, all tanks of less than 119 gallons do not count toward the 1000 gallon requirement, per regulation.

double-quotes-end.png

It's not semantics. You have split hairs numerous times in pointing specifics of a regulation. A regulation is precise and exacting for a reason. It's important to understand the why and the what of a regulation when hauling freight because it can be the difference between being in compliance and receiving a citation. I know you understand this. Stating that something is semantics is to mean that it's a difference in terminology only. As you pointed out in one of my posts, specific terms may not be interchangeable. I could have said, "that's just semantics," but that's not true. Just the same here. It's not simply semantics. Here you are again showing inconsistency in how you view the wording of one post to another, when it comes to referencing a regulation.

Just be consistent. That's not argumentative. It's not combative. It's calling upon you to be a true professional. When a company requires an endorsement for new drivers with the company, it's important for any driver considering that company to understand what goes with that endorsement. Of course, go get the endorsement, but also understand both sides of when the endorsement does and doesn't apply. If we are going to start viewing pointing out the specifics of a regulation as semantics, then why correct anything stated in error?

We both know damn well that if I posted a comment about someone starting out with a company that requires HazMat and the endorsement is required because the company hauls containers of saline solution, then you would never let that fly. You shouldn't let it fly. You wouldn't let it fly if I were to retort by referring to your correction as semantics.

You directly quoted my post, so there is no ambiguity as to whose post you had in mind when talking about it being "semantics."

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ryan... so what?

I know the reg., Prime requires it, so he needs to get it.

Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the feedback Ryan. Take care!

double-quotes-start.png

Good update Sandman.

Prime requires the tanker endorse for all drivers because we haul liquids in the box that exceed 1,001 gallons. Think beer, juice, bottled water, etc.

My Hazmat endorsement has gotten me a couple nice loads so far plus extra $50 per load.

double-quotes-end.png

Your understanding of tanker endorsement reg is incorrect.

First, it's 1000 gallons or more, not 1001 gallons. Second, the volume of individual containers matters. Fir tanker endorsement to be required, each individual container must contain at least 119 gallons. So, bottled water would not be a load requiring a tanker endorsement.

Here's a mock scenario to consider:

You have a load of various size liquid containers going to multiple stops. Your total volume is 3,500 gallons. You have 4 containers with a liquid volume of 200 gallons, 20 containers of 100 liquid gallons, and 700 containers of 1 gallon each. That's over 1000 gallons for the load and individual containers of at least 119 gallons, so tanker endorsement is required, right? False. Once unloading the smaller containers a tanker endorsement would then be required, right? False. The containers of at least 119 gallons do not total 1000 gallons. The reg states that to require a tanker endorsement, the 1000 gallons must be in one tank or distributed among multiple tanks of at least 119 gallons. So, all tanks of less than 119 gallons do not count toward the 1000 gallon requirement, per regulation.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Today, to get me to the terminal , they had me meet up with a driver who was at a customer a town away from mine. They set me up with a hotel room and company car to use while I'm up here to go through the upgrade-to-solo process this week. My road test is supposed to be tomorrow morning but they're not sure yet. Haven't driven a truck since last Thursday so hopefully it goes ok, and still feel horrible about backing. Anyways, I'll advise how it all goes.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Today went great! I started with a pre-trip, then coupled to a trailer, drove a bit, came back and backed the trailer which went surprisingly well for me, uncoupled and parked the tractor. Then a winter-weather Sim drive. Tomorrow will be an upgrade class with two other students from my class who will be getting here tonight.

The backing was what had me worried this whole time about being able to upgrade, and I know I have a looooong way to go to being proficient at it, but at least now it seems when I leave here it'll be in a FL or Volvo and not on a Greyhound bus haha!

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Good deal! The backing will probably take months to get halfway decent, half the time. Take your time, do the "GOALs", and don't hit anything are the largest parts of backing to remember as a new driver.

Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

I will keep all those in mind, thanks PackRat.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Today was spent talking to Safety, HR, Health & Wellness, and the Fleet Leader. Then a mechanic showed me around the truck I was assigned! Tomorrow will be with Maintenance, then we roll out towards home so I can load up my gear.

This company usually does the last week as two students together. Mine was spent with my last trainer and two students from my class were going to do theirs together next week. Except one was pulled out of the class today and he won't be returning. They asked if I'd mind having the other on my truck for up to a week. Uhhh no I don't mind at all, we were hoping it'd line up that we'd co-drive together anyways. And I'm still considered solo with the pay bump, and they're acting like I'm doing them a favor haha. We're all good with it.

I didn't really have a preference on trucks, just excited to be handed the key to anything! Figured it'd be a yellow Freightliner, but got a white Volvo, flipflops not included haha. Didn't get a pic yet.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Ryan... so what?

I know the reg., Prime requires it, so he needs to get it.

You know the reg, but newer drivers or people thinking of becoming drivers do not.

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