How Good Or Bad Is This Work Offer?

Topic 32500 | Page 2

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Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Nick,

Your reasons for getting into trucking in your mid 50s are very similar to mine. I only plan to work about 5 more years and then fully retire.

I signed on with Veriha Trucking in February. I'm from Pennsylvania, they get me home almost every Friday evening on a 5 day work schedule with around 2500 miles of driving. Their starting pay seems low, but they offer lots of bonuses. During my first six months solo, I qualified for every one of them: safety, mileage, revenue, etc. But, I don’t believe thats the norm. So, I'm on track for making the kind of money you want make.

There are lots of companies to choose from as Gtown and others have mentioned here. Give them all a look - I'm sure you'll find something that will work for you.

FYI - be prepared to dedicate a large part of your time and life to trucking. It's very demanding.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

FYI - be prepared to dedicate a large part of your time and life to trucking. It's very demanding.

This is the way to accomplish good earnings and a lot of job satisfaction in the career. You need to be willing to flex your life around the needs of the job for the first year, at minimum.

That is how you learn, and how you develop a reputation for reliability. With that reputation comes the respect of your driver manager , and the subsequent flexibility directed back to you.

If you fight against the lifestyle, the lifestyle will eat you alive. It isn't easy, but then if it were, anyone could do this Job.

Good luck in your decision.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

FYI - be prepared to dedicate a large part of your time and life to trucking. It's very demanding.

double-quotes-end.png

This is the way to accomplish good earnings and a lot of job satisfaction in the career. You need to be willing to flex your life around the needs of the job for the first year, at minimum.

That is how you learn, and how you develop a reputation for reliability. With that reputation comes the respect of your driver manager , and the subsequent flexibility directed back to you.

If you fight against the lifestyle, the lifestyle will eat you alive. It isn't easy, but then if it were, anyone could do this Job.

Good luck in your decision.

As a driver in his 2nd year, I agree with this 100%. I have thus far thrived as a driver, but it has required a great deal of sacrifice, not just from myself, but my family also. I am sure there may be other careers that require similar sacrifices, but this was the first time (since the Marine Corps) that I have had to fully and completely change the way that I live. Financial security for myself and my family has made the sacrifice worth it, at least for now.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Nick,

Your reasons for getting into trucking in your mid 50s are very similar to mine. I only plan to work about 5 more years and then fully retire.

I signed on with Veriha Trucking in February. I'm from Pennsylvania, they get me home almost every Friday evening on a 5 day work schedule with around 2500 miles of driving. Their starting pay seems low, but they offer lots of bonuses. During my first six months solo, I qualified for every one of them: safety, mileage, revenue, etc. But, I don’t believe thats the norm. So, I'm on track for making the kind of money you want make.

There are lots of companies to choose from as Gtown and others have mentioned here. Give them all a look - I'm sure you'll find something that will work for you.

FYI - be prepared to dedicate a large part of your time and life to trucking. It's very demanding.

Hey there Bill M.,

Thank you very much for your feedback. Congratulations on being on track for the kind of money you want to make.

Thus far, I think taking on a Truck Driver as a new career will be a nice and welcome change. Yet for sure, I know that being a truck driver is a very demanding job/career, plus I’m guessing even more so nowadays, since there is a very large nationwide shortage of Truck Drivers.

Continued good luck to you, and Happy Trucking!

Kind Regards,

Nick. S.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

FYI - be prepared to dedicate a large part of your time and life to trucking. It's very demanding.

double-quotes-end.png

This is the way to accomplish good earnings and a lot of job satisfaction in the career. You need to be willing to flex your life around the needs of the job for the first year, at minimum.

That is how you learn, and how you develop a reputation for reliability. With that reputation comes the respect of your driver manager , and the subsequent flexibility directed back to you.

If you fight against the lifestyle, the lifestyle will eat you alive. It isn't easy, but then if it were, anyone could do this Job.

Good luck in your decision.

Hey there Mr. Curmudgeon,

Thank you for your help and advice. It is greatly appreciated. Starting out, I am going to give it my level best to be safe and do a good job and try to follow all of the laws and safety regulations . . . while trying to earn a good reputation and learn all that I can about this interesting and amazing industry.

Thanks again, and “Happy Trucking!”

Kind Regards,

Nick. S.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

FYI - be prepared to dedicate a large part of your time and life to trucking. It's very demanding.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

This is the way to accomplish good earnings and a lot of job satisfaction in the career. You need to be willing to flex your life around the needs of the job for the first year, at minimum.

That is how you learn, and how you develop a reputation for reliability. With that reputation comes the respect of your driver manager , and the subsequent flexibility directed back to you.

If you fight against the lifestyle, the lifestyle will eat you alive. It isn't easy, but then if it were, anyone could do this Job.

Good luck in your decision.

double-quotes-end.png

As a driver in his 2nd year, I agree with this 100%. I have thus far thrived as a driver, but it has required a great deal of sacrifice, not just from myself, but my family also. I am sure there may be other careers that require similar sacrifices, but this was the first time (since the Marine Corps) that I have had to fully and completely change the way that I live. Financial security for myself and my family has made the sacrifice worth it, at least for now.

Hey there Ryan B.,

Thank you for your help and encouragement. I appreciate learning what it has been like for you, as you are into your 2nd year as a truck driver.

Thanks again, and I wish you and your family well. It was great that you found a great new career, while giving you a chance to provide well for your family, and also give you some great financial security. Most of all, thank you for your service (being a Marine).

“Happy Trucking!”

Kind Regards,

Nick. S.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Nick S., I think the $40k-$50k should be fairly easy to accomplish the first year. Along with what the others said, some will depend on what type of freight you haul and where you're located.

I started about eight years ago, went with Schneider Van Truckload, 48 states (but they don't usually send a solo driver to all of 'em) with 5 days of hometime per month. I think I made right about $40k that first year and about $10k more the second year. Now the hometime was interesting. Because they didn't much care how I took it. E.g. my wife needed me to be home for her surgery and they let me run a full three weeks and then take the five days off. normally I went out for two weeks, then home for three days, back out for two weeks, then home two days.

When I ran for Schneider, the big difference between "regional" and "over-the-road" was that the regional guys had to go out Monday morning. Even if they didn't get home until Saturday. If I got home Saturday, it was considered that I worked that day and then I got a full two or three days off before going back out.

The past 5+ years, I've driven for a "southeast regional" company. This company promises to get you home weekly, but that could be just for the 34hr reset. But I, fortunately, live right along one of our regular freight lanes. Thus, I often get home more than once a week and it's pretty rare that I'm home less than two days, unless I choose to keep rolling early.

Like you, I started in my 50's. Got my permit on my 53rd birthday, having only the HRTP here as my training. I believe the research you're doing now, will set you up for success. It sounds exactly like what I did. Schneider wasn't my first company consideration, but it turned out to be the best fit and it was one of the best decisions I made, in this process.

As for seeing the country, it's not quite like the movies, but I have been fortunate to go from Maine to California and Laredo, TX to Northern Michigan. Yep, as a solo driver. It's not all been fun. Driving the snow-covered roads of PA and Northern New York (in the dark!) can be a little scary. Heck, I look back now and think; WHAT THE HELL WAS I DOING? But, I tried to check weather reports, temps, consider the timing of sunrise and such. Somehow (but by the Grace of God!) I've survived...so far.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Nick S., I think the $40k-$50k should be fairly easy to accomplish the first year. Along with what the others said, some will depend on what type of freight you haul and where you're located.

I started about eight years ago, went with Schneider Van Truckload, 48 states (but they don't usually send a solo driver to all of 'em) with 5 days of hometime per month. I think I made right about $40k that first year and about $10k more the second year. Now the hometime was interesting. Because they didn't much care how I took it. E.g. my wife needed me to be home for her surgery and they let me run a full three weeks and then take the five days off. normally I went out for two weeks, then home for three days, back out for two weeks, then home two days.

When I ran for Schneider, the big difference between "regional" and "over-the-road" was that the regional guys had to go out Monday morning. Even if they didn't get home until Saturday. If I got home Saturday, it was considered that I worked that day and then I got a full two or three days off before going back out.

The past 5+ years, I've driven for a "southeast regional" company. This company promises to get you home weekly, but that could be just for the 34hr reset. But I, fortunately, live right along one of our regular freight lanes. Thus, I often get home more than once a week and it's pretty rare that I'm home less than two days, unless I choose to keep rolling early.

Like you, I started in my 50's. Got my permit on my 53rd birthday, having only the HRTP here as my training. I believe the research you're doing now, will set you up for success. It sounds exactly like what I did. Schneider wasn't my first company consideration, but it turned out to be the best fit and it was one of the best decisions I made, in this process.

As for seeing the country, it's not quite like the movies, but I have been fortunate to go from Maine to California and Laredo, TX to Northern Michigan. Yep, as a solo driver. It's not all been fun. Driving the snow-covered roads of PA and Northern New York (in the dark!) can be a little scary. Heck, I look back now and think; WHAT THE HELL WAS I DOING? But, I tried to check weather reports, temps, consider the timing of sunrise and such. Somehow (but by the Grace of God!) I've survived...so far.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

Hello Steve L.,

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post, and for sharing as much as you did. I greatly appreciate it, and thanks for the words of encouragement. All of the information you have shared helps.

Once I get established, it will be interesting to see what time off will be like. Yet ideally, it would be nice to be home enough to maintain a good and healthy family life. I’m not sure if I live in the best location to make it easy to get time off, however I live near Palm Springs and I can almost touch Interstate “10" from my front porch. However time will tell once I find a suitable trucking company to go with. Yet for sure, Interstate 10 is a very popular and well traveled interstate by truck drivers here.

I wish you continued success in the trucking industry. “Happy Trucking!

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Nick S., I think the $40k-$50k should be fairly easy to accomplish the first year. Along with what the others said, some will depend on what type of freight you haul and where you're located.

I started about eight years ago, went with Schneider Van Truckload, 48 states (but they don't usually send a solo driver to all of 'em) with 5 days of hometime per month. I think I made right about $40k that first year and about $10k more the second year. Now the hometime was interesting. Because they didn't much care how I took it. E.g. my wife needed me to be home for her surgery and they let me run a full three weeks and then take the five days off. normally I went out for two weeks, then home for three days, back out for two weeks, then home two days.

When I ran for Schneider, the big difference between "regional" and "over-the-road" was that the regional guys had to go out Monday morning. Even if they didn't get home until Saturday. If I got home Saturday, it was considered that I worked that day and then I got a full two or three days off before going back out.

The past 5+ years, I've driven for a "southeast regional" company. This company promises to get you home weekly, but that could be just for the 34hr reset. But I, fortunately, live right along one of our regular freight lanes. Thus, I often get home more than once a week and it's pretty rare that I'm home less than two days, unless I choose to keep rolling early.

Like you, I started in my 50's. Got my permit on my 53rd birthday, having only the HRTP here as my training. I believe the research you're doing now, will set you up for success. It sounds exactly like what I did. Schneider wasn't my first company consideration, but it turned out to be the best fit and it was one of the best decisions I made, in this process.

As for seeing the country, it's not quite like the movies, but I have been fortunate to go from Maine to California and Laredo, TX to Northern Michigan. Yep, as a solo driver. It's not all been fun. Driving the snow-covered roads of PA and Northern New York (in the dark!) can be a little scary. Heck, I look back now and think; WHAT THE HELL WAS I DOING? But, I tried to check weather reports, temps, consider the timing of sunrise and such. Somehow (but by the Grace of God!) I've survived...so far.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

double-quotes-end.png

Hello Steve L.,

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post, and for sharing as much as you did. I greatly appreciate it, and thanks for the words of encouragement. All of the information you have shared helps.

Once I get established, it will be interesting to see what time off will be like. Yet ideally, it would be nice to be home enough to maintain a good and healthy family life. I’m not sure if I live in the best location to make it easy to get time off, however I live near Palm Springs and I can almost touch Interstate “10" from my front porch. However time will tell once I find a suitable trucking company to go with. Yet for sure, Interstate 10 is a very popular and well traveled interstate by truck drivers here.

I wish you continued success in the trucking industry. “Happy Trucking!

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

Worst case scenario for your location is that you have to drive to and from Fontana or Ontario to get to and from your truck for home time. Best case scenario is that you park your truck on your property. Each company handles this differently, so you will want to ask about where to park as part of your list of questions when first applying.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Nick S., I think the $40k-$50k should be fairly easy to accomplish the first year. Along with what the others said, some will depend on what type of freight you haul and where you're located.

I started about eight years ago, went with Schneider Van Truckload, 48 states (but they don't usually send a solo driver to all of 'em) with 5 days of hometime per month. I think I made right about $40k that first year and about $10k more the second year. Now the hometime was interesting. Because they didn't much care how I took it. E.g. my wife needed me to be home for her surgery and they let me run a full three weeks and then take the five days off. normally I went out for two weeks, then home for three days, back out for two weeks, then home two days.

When I ran for Schneider, the big difference between "regional" and "over-the-road" was that the regional guys had to go out Monday morning. Even if they didn't get home until Saturday. If I got home Saturday, it was considered that I worked that day and then I got a full two or three days off before going back out.

The past 5+ years, I've driven for a "southeast regional" company. This company promises to get you home weekly, but that could be just for the 34hr reset. But I, fortunately, live right along one of our regular freight lanes. Thus, I often get home more than once a week and it's pretty rare that I'm home less than two days, unless I choose to keep rolling early.

Like you, I started in my 50's. Got my permit on my 53rd birthday, having only the HRTP here as my training. I believe the research you're doing now, will set you up for success. It sounds exactly like what I did. Schneider wasn't my first company consideration, but it turned out to be the best fit and it was one of the best decisions I made, in this process.

As for seeing the country, it's not quite like the movies, but I have been fortunate to go from Maine to California and Laredo, TX to Northern Michigan. Yep, as a solo driver. It's not all been fun. Driving the snow-covered roads of PA and Northern New York (in the dark!) can be a little scary. Heck, I look back now and think; WHAT THE HELL WAS I DOING? But, I tried to check weather reports, temps, consider the timing of sunrise and such. Somehow (but by the Grace of God!) I've survived...so far.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Hello Steve L.,

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my post, and for sharing as much as you did. I greatly appreciate it, and thanks for the words of encouragement. All of the information you have shared helps.

Once I get established, it will be interesting to see what time off will be like. Yet ideally, it would be nice to be home enough to maintain a good and healthy family life. I’m not sure if I live in the best location to make it easy to get time off, however I live near Palm Springs and I can almost touch Interstate “10" from my front porch. However time will tell once I find a suitable trucking company to go with. Yet for sure, Interstate 10 is a very popular and well traveled interstate by truck drivers here.

I wish you continued success in the trucking industry. “Happy Trucking!

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

double-quotes-end.png

Worst case scenario for your location is that you have to drive to and from Fontana or Ontario to get to and from your truck for home time. Best case scenario is that you park your truck on your property. Each company handles this differently, so you will want to ask about where to park as part of your list of questions when first applying.

Hey there Ryan B.,

Will do, I will put this on my "To Ask" list. Thanks again for your help.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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