Some Advice Needed

Topic 32605 | Page 1

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William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello again folks so I went back to my old company after graduating CDL school back in July to what I thought would be a driving position well I’ve been stuck being a yard dog for the last 3months sure I make decent money and all and home every night but my goal was to be a driver not a jockey now I’m debating on leaving to find a actual driving position. I’m currently hourly at 24.50 and work 60 hours and week im at odds lol

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dave T.'s Comment
member avatar

I jockeyed for about 6 years before it tore my knee up enough to require major surgery. I enjoyed the home daily and normal schedule other than working nights. It was a good experience but I probably wouldn’t do it again. If you’re wanting to get out on the road, you won’t get there in a yard truck. Of course you can always go OTR but if you want to keep that kinda money and still be home everyday, you’re gonna have to find a delivery job. It’s hard work but if you’re able, it’s a good way to get experience and your foot in the door for bigger and better jobs. I’ve delivered beer, milk, building materials, water and now fuel. I enjoy the customer interactions (sometimes) and enjoy not being stuck in the truck all day. I hated OTR but I got my one year in and went local.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah my job is quite labor intensive as I’m at a transfer station in and out every 10-15 mins and if the tarping guys don’t show up I’m also stuck tarping solo I mean not flatbed tarping but walking floors is like to get actual experience not driving in circles all day I work from 7am to 7pm and on Saturdays I didnt spend 9 grand to get my license to do this.

I jockeyed for about 6 years before it tore my knee up enough to require major surgery. I enjoyed the home daily and normal schedule other than working nights. It was a good experience but I probably wouldn’t do it again. If you’re wanting to get out on the road, you won’t get there in a yard truck. Of course you can always go OTR but if you want to keep that kinda money and still be home everyday, you’re gonna have to find a delivery job. It’s hard work but if you’re able, it’s a good way to get experience and your foot in the door for bigger and better jobs. I’ve delivered beer, milk, building materials, water and now fuel. I enjoy the customer interactions (sometimes) and enjoy not being stuck in the truck all day. I hated OTR but I got my one year in and went local.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Hi, William, just curious to know if you had any training with your company after you got your CDL.

By training I mean OTR type training...running loads, learning how to manage your clocks, navigating, sending QC messages, etc.

I'm asking bc I'm not sure whether some companies will bring you onboard and send you out on loads right away without requiring you to go through their entire training period if you've already trained at another company.

The reverse is possible too. Even if you did go through the training process with your current company there are companies that will require you to have X number of months experience. Otherwise you will have to go through their training program.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for the late reply but no they didn’t train me on anything just tossed me in a yard goat I did get most of that training at school besides that I didn’t get anything from my company I know I’d have to do training at another company which I’m fine with just debating on what to do now.

Hi, William, just curious to know if you had any training with your company after you got your CDL.

By training I mean OTR type training...running loads, learning how to manage your clocks, navigating, sending QC messages, etc.

I'm asking bc I'm not sure whether some companies will bring you onboard and send you out on loads right away without requiring you to go through their entire training period if you've already trained at another company.

The reverse is possible too. Even if you did go through the training process with your current company there are companies that will require you to have X number of months experience. Otherwise you will have to go through their training program.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for the late reply but no they didn’t train me on anything just tossed me in a yard goat I did get most of that training at school besides that I didn’t get anything from my company I know I’d have to do training at another company which I’m fine with just debating on what to do now.

double-quotes-start.png

Hi, William, just curious to know if you had any training with your company after you got your CDL.

By training I mean OTR type training...running loads, learning how to manage your clocks, navigating, sending QC messages, etc.

I'm asking bc I'm not sure whether some companies will bring you onboard and send you out on loads right away without requiring you to go through their entire training period if you've already trained at another company.

The reverse is possible too. Even if you did go through the training process with your current company there are companies that will require you to have X number of months experience. Otherwise you will have to go through their training program.

double-quotes-end.png

Put out applications with as many companies as possible that hire without driving experience.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Hello again folks so I went back to my old company after graduating CDL school back in July to what I thought would be a driving position well I’ve been stuck being a yard dog for the last 3months sure I make decent money and all and home every night but my goal was to be a driver not a jockey now I’m debating on leaving to find a actual driving position. I’m currently hourly at 24.50 and work 60 hours and week im at odds lol

If you want to go drive then I’d put applications out and go drive. You’re not doing your trucking career any favors starting out in a hostler because a cdl isn’t even required by law to operate a hostler unless you operate it on the road (it can still be required by the company’s insurance or course). If you wait too long you’ll have a hard time finding a cdl driving job anywhere because of—take a wild guess—insurance, because of the lack of recent driving school attendance or driving experience.

If you need more time to make up your mind I’d at least apply to and call up some companies that hire new grads so you can find out how much time they’ll allow to lapse between the time you graduated trucking school to whenever you get hired on with whatever company you end up going with. I would hate to see you wait too long and then find out you either have to go back to trucking school to satisfy insurance requirements or go with a less reputable company just to get the required experience.

Anyone reading this who has more knowledge about specific requirements for new grads, please correct me if I’m wrong

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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