10 Roads Express

Topic 32695 | Page 2

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Andrey's Comment
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Thanks everybody for ideas. I saw quite a few 10Roads trucks in VA, PA and New England too. And yes, a lot depends on a place. I remember how different were Roehl terminals in Wisconsin and Georgia... So I'll give it a try (it is in Nashua, NH) and report here hopefully soon.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

G-Town's Comment
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Welcome back Andrey! Good luck with your new adventure!

James H.'s Comment
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I've been a part time/casual driver for them since April out of their Kearny NJ yard, and it's been a very positive experience. And as you note, there aren't a lot of part time options out there. Around here it's them, Amazon and FedEx contractors, and some small-time operators you'd be well advised to steer clear of.

The company was formed by a merger of Hoovestal, Eagle Express, Pat Salmon, and maybe some others, which explains the different branding you'll sometimes see on the trailers we pull.

As a part-timer you'll be slip seating in a variety of trucks. At least in my experience, the other drivers leave the trucks acceptably clean. Some of the equipment is on the older side, but that might just be my impression since I prefer a manual transmission, and those are the trucks I usually take. They do keep up on maintenance - certainly better at some other places I've worked.

My driver managers, relay drivers, and the others I've dealt with at the company have been courteous, competent, and professional. The people at the postal facilities have been more of a mixed bag, but no worse than other shippers and receivers I've encountered. I've done mostly USPS contracts, but the occasional freight. The trips I've covered have been a mix of live load/unloads and drop-and-hooks and usually involve meeting a relay driver at a truck stop or company yard. Pay is hourly, based on a 'trip standard' which is typically generous enough that I will complete, and get paid for, an 11.5 hour trip in 10 or 11 hours for example. If there's ever a delay that causes me to go beyond the trip standard, I get paid for the extra time. As far as I know it's a straight hourly rate, with no overtime, but as a part-timer that won't be a concern. There's a $5 weekend differential, and the weekend is defined as from 00:01 am Friday to 23:59 Sunday. Pay varies by location due to prevailing wage rules at USPS. For me it's $36/hour Mon to Thur, and $41/hour Friday to Sunday. That includes about $5 and change in benefit pay, which full-timers can use to offset health and dental insurance, but you'll just get in your paycheck. I get an extra $50 for trips to or through NYC, which I was doing a lot last month, covering a trip out to Long Island. It shows up on my pay stub as Flatpay - NY/CO MTN PAY: $50.00, which suggests you also get extra money for driving across the mountains out west.

Trucks are governed at 68 mph. Forward and inside-facing cameras.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop-and-hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Andrey's Comment
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I've been a part time/casual driver for them since April out of their Kearny NJ yard

Thank you, James! This is the information I was looking for. When do you start? The craigslist ad mentions several shifts, but their website has only one - 4am.

James H.'s Comment
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When do you start? The craigslist ad mentions several shifts, but their website has only one - 4am.

It varies, based on their needs and my availability. There's a 7:30 am trip I do almost every Sunday since the regular driver has young kids and wants to be home on the weekend, but I've also done afternoon and evening starts that they needed covered on a temporary basis due to vacations, or because they had a vacancy and hadn't yet filled the full-time position.

I don't know how much information the recruiter could give you, but after you're hired you could discuss it with your driver manager and the supervisor of the Nashua facility. Do you want a set schedule week after week, or are you more open to taking on assignments as they come your way?

Some of the company's routes are quite long, and might be managed from a different region. For example, one trip I've done several times is to be the easternmost link on a cross country route from Jersey City to Oakland, and the person who manages that contract is based in Minnesota while my DM is in Virginia. So once you're in their system as casual/PT, you might get calls from all over asking if you'd be interested in helping out.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ralph G. ( Arejay )'s Comment
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I had heard that this was a re-brand of Eagle. I'm curious if this was partly due to too much bad publicity? When I lived in the Chicago area, Eagle had a very bad reputation for having the most aggressive and rudest truck drivers on the road. I can recall at least a few occasions where I was almost hit or run out of my lane by an overly aggressive Eagle truck pulling mail hauler trailers. On every occasion, these occurrences all took place on the expressways in and around the Chicago suburbs. I wonder if that was just a thing in Chicago or something? The 10 Roads trucks that I've seen around Florida all appear to be pretty new and in good condition. I've also noticed the 10 Roads drivers in Florida are much more courteous than what I recall of the Eagle drivers in Illinois.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Guy B.'s Comment
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G-Town's Comment
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rofl-1.gif

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PackRat's Comment
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This is actually not that far off from reality.

Talladega offers a few paid laps around the track, at $50 per vehicle, during the holiday season for the past few years. I believe the proceeds all go to charities such as the USMC Toys For Tots campaign.

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