New Driver/Bad Reviews

Topic 32758 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Austin E.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello all. I am new both to driving and to this forum so I hope this topic hasn't been posted a ton and my apologies if it has. I am former law enforcement but due to an injury sustained in the line of duty, I was forced to make a career change. But I'm not the "sit in an office all day" type of person. I like being out and about and I don't mind doing some hard work to go along with it, so trucking caught my interest.

As someone who is new to the industry, I'm still not naive enough to not understand that companies are going to put their "best" information on the website to try to get you hired, and the recruiters will tell you what you want to hear. It was the same with the military when I was serving.

That said, if you just look at reviews for a large majority of companies that hire new drivers, they are usually pretty dang terrible. As someone new to this industry, I'd love to hear from some of you on what to believe and what not to believe. I have a family so I certainly don't want to get into a horrible situation, but I also know that there will be cons to anything you do, that's just part of life.

Some companies I am looking into that are associated with my CDL school are Averitt, Werner, Schneider, etc. But there are other companies like Warrior Logistics, EPES Transport, USA Truck, Paschall Truck Lines, etc. that will also hire new grads and put you through their training.

Thanks so much for your time. I appreciate any comments.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
BK's Comment
member avatar

Hi Austin and welcome. This topic is discussed regularly, but for good reason. People getting started in the industry need to have a realistic view of reviews about companies. Most of what you read is pure garbage posted by disgruntled employees or ex-employees. If the truth was known, these negative nobodies created whatever mess they are griping about.

Personally, I started out with Schneider. They didn’t have CDL training then, but they do now. And you get to go for free and even get paid. Schneider has top notch training and instructors. I left Schneider for various reasons but I still think they are a fine company, especially as a starter company. Prime is another stellar example, as is CFI, TMC, Swift and many others. Approach those negative reviews with a heavy dose of skepticism.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Travis's Comment
member avatar

I can second Scheider. I got my CDL separately but the bulk tanker training I received was great, very safety focused company.

It was no fault of Schneider's I left, merely an opportunity they simply couldn't match.

I'm actually headed to the new job now after a few weeks of training. If for some reason I absolutely hate it I'd head back to Schneider with no issues. I actually just got a "rehire" email from them

Hi Austin and welcome. This topic is discussed regularly, but for good reason. People getting started in the industry need to have a realistic view of reviews about companies. Most of what you read is pure garbage posted by disgruntled employees or ex-employees. If the truth was known, these negative nobodies created whatever mess they are griping about.

Personally, I started out with Schneider. They didn’t have CDL training then, but they do now. And you get to go for free and even get paid. Schneider has top notch training and instructors. I left Schneider for various reasons but I still think they are a fine company, especially as a starter company. Prime is another stellar example, as is CFI, TMC, Swift and many others. Approach those negative reviews with a heavy dose of skepticism.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to our forum Austin!

Trucking is a unique industry. We like to say it's an incredible opportunity that requires incredible people. It's a very independent job that allows individuals to pretty much manage themselves into prosperity or misery. Keep that in mind when reading reviews.

Now, let me share my experience. I began my career at Western Express. If you've been reading internet reviews you've probably seen drivers complaining about that company. They give a lot of people a shot at this career. Unfortunately most of them don't prove to be worthy candidates.

Trucking companies are pretty basic operations. They all try to move freight efficiently with very little opportunity to distinguish themselves from each other. There's just not a lot of difference from one company to another. Remember that, and don't be fooled by the common misconception most newcomers have developed from their internet research. It is a fool's game to try and determine if brand X is a bad company to start with or if brand Y is a good company for beginners. You'd be splitting hairs to establish differences in the two, and as a rookie you would have no way to understand the insignificant nuances of difference in the companies willing to hire you.

I shared the company I started with because I wanted you to know I had a great rookie year there. I made good money and learned a lot during that year. I'd still be there had I not received an offer I saw as a great opportunity for me. After sixteen months there I moved to Knight and have been in a dedicated position there for nine years now.

It boils down to this... you will enjoy this career or hate it. The ones who hate it ALWAYS blame their employer. They know their success hangs on their own efforts, yet they failed miserably. To admit defeat is not as easy as laying blame somewhere, and it means you have to admit your shortcomings.

Don't fall for it. Be a responsible rookie who strives to be the best he can be. That's how I have always approached my trucking career. I am determined to be the best. I have had great experiences at a place where almost every driver claims it is a terrible company. Your trucking experience will be determined by your commitment to success. Take the high road of determination and commitment. Leave that low road of trash talking companies to the foolish ones who don't even understand what they've gotten into.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Austin! You have come to the right place.

That said, if you just look at reviews for a large majority of companies that hire new drivers, they are usually pretty dang terrible. As someone new to this industry, I'd love to hear from some of you on what to believe and what not to believe. I have a family so I certainly don't want to get into a horrible situation, but I also know that there will be cons to anything you do, that's just part of life.

What NOT to believe? Most of it. Bruce (BK) offered the long and the short of it. You rarely see good reviews, because top performing, happy drivers are too busy to be bothered with going to the sites and offering their two cents. The other thing to be leery of; these reviews typically include all employees and not just drivers. For instance, the last time I looked at one of the Indeed reviews, 189 people wrote a review about a company that employed 30,000+ workers. That is less than a 1% sampling. Not exactly reliable and credible. Do those 189 people represent the views of the remaining 29,811 employees? Unlikely.

I drove for Swift for 8+ years, achieving Double Diamond Status and was very happy with my choice. If you believe the reviews written about Swift, they are the darling of negative commentary. Is it true? No, hell no! I went to their school in Richmond, mentored (road trained) with them for another 6 weeks, ran solo OTR for 3 months and finally settled on a NE Regional Walmart Dedicated account until leaving them in September of 2021. This was due to a significant move (lifestyle decision) and my desire to run local, otherwise I'd still be pulling Walmart Wagons. I would not change anything with the path I chose committing to Swift.

We have numerous examples (active member of this forum) of highly successful, top performing drivers representing Prime, Swift, Schneider, Roehl, Knight, Werner, etc., companies who are almost always misrepresented on the review boards. Our advice, if you need to read about trucking on the interweb, stick with company websites and Trucking Truth. We will always give you the unfiltered truth.

Trucking Truth is a wealth of valuable information and designed to help people trying to enter trucking as a career. As we always do, we recommend reading and studying the following links to establish a truthful and accurate information base and set realistic goals and expectations. As follows:

Trucking Truth also highly recommends taking the Paid CDL Training Programs approach to schooling.

Here is why (click the link): Why Company Paid/Sponsored Training is the Preferred Choice

Use this link to apply: Apply For Paid CDL Training

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Austin E.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks so much for this fantastic reply. This is exactly what I was looking for. As you say, work is often what we make it, and I am looking forward to earning my place in this field even though it was an unexpected career change. Thank you again.

Welcome to our forum Austin!

Trucking is a unique industry. We like to say it's an incredible opportunity that requires incredible people. It's a very independent job that allows individuals to pretty much manage themselves into prosperity or misery. Keep that in mind when reading reviews.

Now, let me share my experience. I began my career at Western Express. If you've been reading internet reviews you've probably seen drivers complaining about that company. They give a lot of people a shot at this career. Unfortunately most of them don't prove to be worthy candidates.

Trucking companies are pretty basic operations. They all try to move freight efficiently with very little opportunity to distinguish themselves from each other. There's just not a lot of difference from one company to another. Remember that, and don't be fooled by the common misconception most newcomers have developed from their internet research. It is a fool's game to try and determine if brand X is a bad company to start with or if brand Y is a good company for beginners. You'd be splitting hairs to establish differences in the two, and as a rookie you would have no way to understand the insignificant nuances of difference in the companies willing to hire you.

I shared the company I started with because I wanted you to know I had a great rookie year there. I made good money and learned a lot during that year. I'd still be there had I not received an offer I saw as a great opportunity for me. After sixteen months there I moved to Knight and have been in a dedicated position there for nine years now.

It boils down to this... you will enjoy this career or hate it. The ones who hate it ALWAYS blame their employer. They know their success hangs on their own efforts, yet they failed miserably. To admit defeat is not as easy as laying blame somewhere, and it means you have to admit your shortcomings.

Don't fall for it. Be a responsible rookie who strives to be the best he can be. That's how I have always approached my trucking career. I am determined to be the best. I have had great experiences at a place where almost every driver claims it is a terrible company. Your trucking experience will be determined by your commitment to success. Take the high road of determination and commitment. Leave that low road of trash talking companies to the foolish ones who don't even understand what they've gotten into.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Austin E.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for your response, I really appreciate it. It does seem pretty common that disgruntled employees will quickly blame the company and not themselves, so taking it with a grain of salt seems to be good advice.

Hi Austin and welcome. This topic is discussed regularly, but for good reason. People getting started in the industry need to have a realistic view of reviews about companies. Most of what you read is pure garbage posted by disgruntled employees or ex-employees. If the truth was known, these negative nobodies created whatever mess they are griping about.

Personally, I started out with Schneider. They didn’t have CDL training then, but they do now. And you get to go for free and even get paid. Schneider has top notch training and instructors. I left Schneider for various reasons but I still think they are a fine company, especially as a starter company. Prime is another stellar example, as is CFI, TMC, Swift and many others. Approach those negative reviews with a heavy dose of skepticism.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bumping this...

Welcome Austin! You have come to the right place.

double-quotes-start.png

That said, if you just look at reviews for a large majority of companies that hire new drivers, they are usually pretty dang terrible. As someone new to this industry, I'd love to hear from some of you on what to believe and what not to believe. I have a family so I certainly don't want to get into a horrible situation, but I also know that there will be cons to anything you do, that's just part of life.

double-quotes-end.png

What NOT to believe? Most of it. Bruce (BK) offered the long and the short of it. You rarely see good reviews, because top performing, happy drivers are too busy to be bothered with going to the sites and offering their two cents. The other thing to be leery of; these reviews typically include all employees and not just drivers. For instance, the last time I looked at one of the Indeed reviews, 189 people wrote a review about a company that employed 30,000+ workers. That is less than a 1% sampling. Not exactly reliable and credible. Do those 189 people represent the views of the remaining 29,811 employees? Unlikely.

I drove for Swift for 8+ years, achieving Double Diamond Status and was very happy with my choice. If you believe the reviews written about Swift, they are the darling of negative commentary. Is it true? No, hell no! I went to their school in Richmond, mentored (road trained) with them for another 6 weeks, ran solo OTR for 3 months and finally settled on a NE Regional Walmart Dedicated account until leaving them in September of 2021. This was due to a significant move (lifestyle decision) and my desire to run local, otherwise I'd still be pulling Walmart Wagons. I would not change anything with the path I chose committing to Swift.

We have numerous examples (active member of this forum) of highly successful, top performing drivers representing Prime, Swift, Schneider, Roehl, Knight, Werner, etc., companies who are almost always misrepresented on the review boards. Our advice, if you need to read about trucking on the interweb, stick with company websites and Trucking Truth. We will always give you the unfiltered truth.

Trucking Truth is a wealth of valuable information and designed to help people trying to enter trucking as a career. As we always do, we recommend reading and studying the following links to establish a truthful and accurate information base and set realistic goals and expectations. As follows:

Trucking Truth also highly recommends taking the Paid CDL Training Programs approach to schooling.

Here is why (click the link): Why Company Paid/Sponsored Training is the Preferred Choice

Use this link to apply: Apply For Paid CDL Training

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Austin E.'s Comment
member avatar

That is fantastic information, thanks so much!

Welcome Austin! You have come to the right place.

double-quotes-start.png

That said, if you just look at reviews for a large majority of companies that hire new drivers, they are usually pretty dang terrible. As someone new to this industry, I'd love to hear from some of you on what to believe and what not to believe. I have a family so I certainly don't want to get into a horrible situation, but I also know that there will be cons to anything you do, that's just part of life.

double-quotes-end.png

What NOT to believe? Most of it. Bruce (BK) offered the long and the short of it. You rarely see good reviews, because top performing, happy drivers are too busy to be bothered with going to the sites and offering their two cents. The other thing to be leery of; these reviews typically include all employees and not just drivers. For instance, the last time I looked at one of the Indeed reviews, 189 people wrote a review about a company that employed 30,000+ workers. That is less than a 1% sampling. Not exactly reliable and credible. Do those 189 people represent the views of the remaining 29,811 employees? Unlikely.

I drove for Swift for 8+ years, achieving Double Diamond Status and was very happy with my choice. If you believe the reviews written about Swift, they are the darling of negative commentary. Is it true? No, hell no! I went to their school in Richmond, mentored (road trained) with them for another 6 weeks, ran solo OTR for 3 months and finally settled on a NE Regional Walmart Dedicated account until leaving them in September of 2021. This was due to a significant move (lifestyle decision) and my desire to run local, otherwise I'd still be pulling Walmart Wagons. I would not change anything with the path I chose committing to Swift.

We have numerous examples (active member of this forum) of highly successful, top performing drivers representing Prime, Swift, Schneider, Roehl, Knight, Werner, etc., companies who are almost always misrepresented on the review boards. Our advice, if you need to read about trucking on the interweb, stick with company websites and Trucking Truth. We will always give you the unfiltered truth.

Trucking Truth is a wealth of valuable information and designed to help people trying to enter trucking as a career. As we always do, we recommend reading and studying the following links to establish a truthful and accurate information base and set realistic goals and expectations. As follows:

Trucking Truth also highly recommends taking the Paid CDL Training Programs approach to schooling.

Here is why (click the link): Why Company Paid/Sponsored Training is the Preferred Choice

Use this link to apply: Apply For Paid CDL Training

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dean R.'s Comment
member avatar

I went with Schneider after an unsuccessful attempt at flatbed with a small regional carrier. Orientation for new drivers with a CDL was two weeks. After orientation I spent 5 days with a TE (Training Engineer) before getting my own truck. I was on the Walmart Dedicated account out of Sterling, IL. I delivered to stores in Southern Wisconsin, Upper Northwest Indiana, Central IL. and Eastern Iowa. Any yeah, that included Chicago proper (Cook and Lake counties) and the suburbs. Best backing training you'll get!

Schneider offers a CDL program now. I don't know much about it. Regarding the 5 days with a TE - I learned a lot in that short time. I personally did not want 3 to 5 weeks in someone else's truck during the pandemic.

Dean

Hello all. I am new both to driving and to this forum so I hope this topic hasn't been posted a ton and my apologies if it has. I am former law enforcement but due to an injury sustained in the line of duty, I was forced to make a career change. But I'm not the "sit in an office all day" type of person. I like being out and about and I don't mind doing some hard work to go along with it, so trucking caught my interest.

As someone who is new to the industry, I'm still not naive enough to not understand that companies are going to put their "best" information on the website to try to get you hired, and the recruiters will tell you what you want to hear. It was the same with the military when I was serving.

That said, if you just look at reviews for a large majority of companies that hire new drivers, they are usually pretty dang terrible. As someone new to this industry, I'd love to hear from some of you on what to believe and what not to believe. I have a family so I certainly don't want to get into a horrible situation, but I also know that there will be cons to anything you do, that's just part of life.

Some companies I am looking into that are associated with my CDL school are Averitt, Werner, Schneider, etc. But there are other companies like Warrior Logistics, EPES Transport, USA Truck, Paschall Truck Lines, etc. that will also hire new grads and put you through their training.

Thanks so much for your time. I appreciate any comments.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More