Patience’s Was Honestly Key But I Didnt Eat..

Topic 32812 | Page 1

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Shaddy's Comment
member avatar

I accidentally backed into a gate and slightly bent it but no damage to the trailer. I reported it to the shipper (Home Depot) and to my company (Schneider). I only have 3 weeks experience, I totally own up to no getting out and look (from my point of view looking at both mirrors it seemed clear, so I honestly thought nothing was in my way). I was hoping that Schneider doesn’t report it on my DAC (they could take the fees from my check because the damage wasn’t that bad and I would rather money being taken from my check than a report of something so minor on my record.) I was honestly trying to get a job as an Driver Groundman and work at Schneider in the mean while till that job opportunity comes up. I was wondering would it affect my chances on getting that job?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Klutch's Comment
member avatar

They report everything. It will be a preventable accident, hit fixed object.

Every potential employer is different. When I had interviewed with other companies none of them seemed concerned about my DAC , only my clean MVR. The seasoned drivers will have better information on that I’m sure.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Shaddy's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Klutch, this actually just happen to me 5 hours ago. Kinda upset that it happen but how long does it stay on my record?

They report everything. It will be a preventable accident, hit fixed object.

Every potential employer is different. When I had interviewed with other companies none of them seemed concerned about my DAC , only my clean MVR. The seasoned drivers will have better information on that I’m sure.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Shaddy's Comment
member avatar

And do you think I’ll get fired?

They report everything. It will be a preventable accident, hit fixed object.

Every potential employer is different. When I had interviewed with other companies none of them seemed concerned about my DAC , only my clean MVR. The seasoned drivers will have better information on that I’m sure.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Klutch's Comment
member avatar

I had two preventable accidents with Schneider my first year, as long as you take ownership and stay positive they will just have you do a training session and send you back on your way. I had a “hit fixed object” in my first week, nothing you can do now just learn from it and move on. I know they hammer it into us in training but seriously, if your questioning it just get out and look.

I’m not sure how long that stuff stays on the DAC , I want to say 3 years but hopefully someone will pipe in that knows for sure.

And do you think I’ll get fired?

double-quotes-start.png

They report everything. It will be a preventable accident, hit fixed object.

Every potential employer is different. When I had interviewed with other companies none of them seemed concerned about my DAC, only my clean MVR. The seasoned drivers will have better information on that I’m sure.

double-quotes-end.png

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Most of us have done far worse, trust me. Be honest and own it, when they ask what you learned from it. As long as your not on thin ice already before this you will probably be fine. All companies that train and/or hire inexperienced drivers expect a certain amount of things to happen.

They may have you come in for additional training time. They may put you on probation for awhile. Learn from this incident and move forward with your career. Do not dwell on it, that will just stress you out and more messip’s will follow.

I think things like this stay around for about 3 years.

Your honesty and attitude will play a major factor in their final decision.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Based on vast historical data, Schneider and the other mega carriers expect new drivers to have a few of these incidents. If they don’t, great but that is somewhat rare. I had a few with Schneider and like Klutch says, under normal circumstances you are not at risk of being fired. And there is no negotiation about what goes on your record. It all does and eventually goes away. So, welcome to the club. The main thing is just to learn from the experience and not repeat the boo boo. And enjoy your time at the OC meeting with one of the tan shirt gestapo people and not getting any pay for the re-education time.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
And enjoy your time at the OC meeting with one of the tan shirt gestapo people and not getting any pay for the re-education time.

Wow, incredibly rude thing to say Bruce. Not to mention it diminishes what they actually did.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Your honesty and attitude will play a major factor in their final decision.

I'd like to reiterate this, although it was mentioned several times already. This is huge. Like everyone keeps saying, own it. Don't make excuses or blame anyone. Just say, "I screwed up. No excuses. I'm willing to go through whatever additional training or classes you'd like to put me through, and this will make me a better driver."

See, if you make excuses or place blame elsewhere, they'll expect you to keep on making mistakes without learning from them, and no one wants drivers like that. We all make mistakes, but not everyone takes responsibility and attempts to learn from it and get better. Let them know in no uncertain terms that you care very much about what happened and you will get better because of it.

We've had several Schneider drivers in this forum over the years who had accidents but were forgiven. They owned it, and Schneider showed them mercy. They'll do the same for you if you handle it well.

Don't let it rattle you, but do make sure to be far more careful. No one here will condemn you for it, but we hope you'll take it seriously and work hard at learning from it.

Shaddy's Comment
member avatar

I definitely own up to it! No one to blame but myself, I honestly got out and look 4 times before this happen. Like I mentioned before I was looking out both my windows and didn’t see anything that would make me question myself to get out and both side “looked” clear but she sadly it wasn’t.

double-quotes-start.png

Your honesty and attitude will play a major factor in their final decision.

double-quotes-end.png

I'd like to reiterate this, although it was mentioned several times already. This is huge. Like everyone keeps saying, own it. Don't make excuses or blame anyone. Just say, "I screwed up. No excuses. I'm willing to go through whatever additional training or classes you'd like to put me through, and this will make me a better driver."

See, if you make excuses or place blame elsewhere, they'll expect you to keep on making mistakes without learning from them, and no one wants drivers like that. We all make mistakes, but not everyone takes responsibility and attempts to learn from it and get better. Let them know in no uncertain terms that you care very much about what happened and you will get better because of it.

We've had several Schneider drivers in this forum over the years who had accidents but were forgiven. They owned it, and Schneider showed them mercy. They'll do the same for you if you handle it well.

Don't let it rattle you, but do make sure to be far more careful. No one here will condemn you for it, but we hope you'll take it seriously and work hard at learning from it.

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