Low Bridges & Misc.

Topic 33683 | Page 1

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BK's Comment
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Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
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Testing the waters a bit there, arent you, Driver?

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
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Sorry, photo loading fail...

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awaiting deletion's Comment
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Those first two pictures-are trailers taller in Europe? (assuming that's where they are.) Both of those bridges are listed over 13'6".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pelican's Comment
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I drove under a 13'4" bridge in Elizabeth, NJ.

Don't ask me how. I dunno either.

BK's Comment
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I drove under a 13'4" bridge in Elizabeth, NJ.

Don't ask me how. I dunno either.

So how did you deal with this situation? How did you determine that you would fit underneath, or did you just close your eyes and take a run at it? Lol

I’m curious because I took an actual measurement of the trailer I usually haul and it measured 13’5” tall. So I’m assuming your bridge was labeled lower than actual height.

Old School's Comment
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Those first two pictures-are trailers taller in Europe? (assuming that's where they are.) Both of those bridges are listed over 13'6".

I'm certain these are not actual photos. They've been doctored. The graphics on the trailers are what makes them funny. So somebody with too much time on their hands set up these scenarios on photoshop or something similar.

Some of us spend our spare time being amused. Others spend it being amusing. Then there are those of us who don't seem to know what spare time is.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
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I drove under a 13'4" bridge in Elizabeth, NJ.

Don't ask me how. I dunno either.

Some of the Northeastern states allow for winter snow pack in their bridge measurements. You'll find this common in that area. That bridge may actually be 14'-4" in the summer months. They give you a lesser height so you can still be confident you'll fit under when there's 12" of snow packed on the street.

Hopefully the snow plow will show up before it gets deeper than that! good-luck.gif

Old School's Comment
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So how did you deal with this situation? How did you determine that you would fit underneath, or did you just close your eyes and take a run at it? Lol

BK, when I was a rookie driver, I had this same experience. I saw the bridge measurement and decided to pull over on the shoulder to make a plan. Once I was stopped, I witnessed several eighteen wheelers go under without hesitation. Then I just proceeded with caution.

Pelican's Comment
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That has to be the case, yeah. Typically I'll pull all the way up and get out and eyeball the height difference. Then proceed very slowly. A single bump can be bad.

This particular one I eyeballed it from the drivers seat. The shipper , which had two separate yards about 1.6 miles apart, told me to take this route specifically so I felt like they wouldn't lead me astray. It was a weird tunnel type thing. Here's some pictures I found of the area. The one with the Bay & Bay is the 13'4".

There was another bridge I had to go under which was either 13"6' or 13"7' just past it. Fun times. Did this at midnight too.

Then you have this little maze bridge thing, I was paranoid I was gonna clip something lol

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I drove under a 13'4" bridge in Elizabeth, NJ.

Don't ask me how. I dunno either.

double-quotes-end.png

So how did you deal with this situation? How did you determine that you would fit underneath, or did you just close your eyes and take a run at it? Lol

I’m curious because I took an actual measurement of the trailer I usually haul and it measured 13’5” tall. So I’m assuming your bridge was labeled lower than actual height.

0180608001702551298.jpg

0546275001702551330.jpg

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

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