What Companies Hire With No Experience And Didnt Go To A Roadmaster Or Other Driving Schools

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Trevor H.'s Comment
member avatar

Editor's Note: Here is a list of Paid CDL Training Programs that hire drivers with no experience

Im in the process of getting my cdl but im not going to a driving school. Does anyone know of any companies that will hire me? Thank you in advance!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

I would say just about any OTR company would hire you (depending on diving record). I'm sure you would have to go through said companies training program of course. As far as local companies that's a tough call. They generally don't hire with no experience but especially since you didn't get any formal training I can imagine it would be even tougher. Best thing to do in any situation is call and talk to a recruiter or hiring manager. And just apply to every place under the sun regardless of what they say they want for experience. You just never know who might take a chance on you.

Good luck!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Trevor, I'm not sure Heavy C gave you the right answer. It is extremely difficult to get an OTR job without the training certificate that comes from a driving school. This is a requirement by the insurance carriers that are taking on the liability of the new drivers out there driving 80,000 pounds down the road, so it is kind of understandable. What you will have to do is get on with a company that provides Company-Sponsored Training , those are companies that will train you for the CDL and give you a job after you're done. It won't matter that you already have the CDL, and they may even let you skip the initial phase of training, I don't know for sure, but that is just about the only way I see that you will be able to get on in your situation. The Company-Sponsored Training programs are free with the exception that you must sign a contract stating that you will work for them for one year to meet your obligation to them. If you can't afford a truck driving school, or just don't want to go that route then I think this will be your only option to getting a job with a CDL but no training certificate.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

I stand corrected. Thanks old school!

Schism's Comment
member avatar

From my reading its not solely just a cdl school in some cases .

Some carriers want a 160 hour certified course , and others take it a step farther and want graduates from only accepted schools .

The rare people that make untrained CDL-A work are typically members of family owned business .

I've heard of people planning on the untrained CDL-A with the plan that they are going O/O right out of the gate ( bad move in itself ) and that fails as well due to Freight Brokers not wanting to risk loads on a new driver .

This is the era of insurance controlled Transportation . GO TO SCHOOL .

~S~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Trevor H.'s Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't mind going a school if they taught you what you need to know. I know about 7 people that have went to roadmaster and few other schools and they all said that the only thing they teach you how to shift, back up, and parallel park, and of course the pre-trip. They dont really teach you what to do on certain situations and how strap youre loads. They all said it was a waste of time. So im trying save time and headaches.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't mind going a school if they taught you what you need to know. I know about 7 people that have went to roadmaster and few other schools and they all said that the only thing they teach you how to shift, back up, and parallel park, and of course the pre-trip. They dont really teach you what to do on certain situations and how strap youre loads. They all said it was a waste of time. So im trying save time and headaches.

Trevor,

I went through Prime's training, and I can tell you from experience they will not just throw you out onto the road if they do not think you are ready to go solo.

They also put you with instructor/trainer that works in the fleet you are wanting to go on (reefer/flatbed/tanker).

The initial part of training, getting your CDL-A license it exactly what you talked about, pre-trip/backing/shifting etc.

I know several other drivers here on the forum have had the same type experience as I did with Prime when it comes to training before they went solo.

Even if you go to a school like RoadMaster, you will still need more training before you will be set free solo. It only makes sense that they do that so that you & they are comfortable with you being out on the road solo.

Ernie

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar
I know about 7 people that have went to roadmaster and few other schools and they all said that the only thing they teach you how to shift, back up, and parallel park, and of course the pre-trip

I can tell you this much that's what most schools do. The school I went to cane right out and said the first day "we are here to help you get your license. Everything else you will learn on the job". I think they do this for two reasons. First is there is just way too much about the industry for then to possibly cover in the short amount of time they get. Second is to let the companies teach their employees how they like things done and how it should be done. I.e. strapping loads, sliding tandoms, etc. They just want to give you the basics to get started. Hope this helps

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Trevor, I appreciate your initiative, but please take our advice, it comes from people who genuinely want you to succeed and know how the process works. The trucking companies could care less whether they hire you or not, they've got loads of people who are going about this they way they need it to be done. I'm gonna be real frank with you, you're going to have more headaches and waste more time going about this the way you've decided.

I know about 7 people that have went to roadmaster and few other schools and they all said that the only thing they teach you how to shift, back up, and parallel park, and of course the pre-trip. They dont really teach you what to do on certain situations and how strap youre loads. They all said it was a waste of time.

Your seven acquaintances are correct, but they are also misguided and ignorant about the process. I don't know of a driving school in the country that really teaches anyone to be a professional driver - their main purpose is to help you get the CDL , and the most important thing they do is provide you with a training certificate. You may be tempted to say "what good is that piece of paper if they didn't teach me the things I need to know?" The good of it is that it is what opens the door for you, and the door I'm referring to is the door of a nice shiny Big Rig. Man, do yourself a big favor and heed good solid advice, even if you don't like it.

When you get a job that is where you will learn the things you need to know, that's how it works. You may think it's crazy, but trust me, you will be butting your head up against a brick wall if you continue on in your chosen path. The way you do it is get that training certificate and CDL, then expect to learn about load securement and what ever else you need to know from your new employer. No matter how intelligent you are, or even how determined you are you will never get the trucking industry to bend to your will. If you knew my history with getting into trucking you would realize that I was the most stubborn determined new rookie that ever was, but I got rejected many times and found that you can't get anything done in this business unless you follow the procedures they need you to.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Trevor, you gotta play ball. There's really no way around it - this is how the industry operates. The possibility of you finding a trucking job is very slim without going to a school that's about 160 hours, or going through company-paid CDL schooling. There's no use fighting it, and I'll put it a little more bluntly than the previous posters, you'd better go into this with a positive attitude and lots of humility. You have everything to prove to trucking companies, and that includes going the route that you'll need to take in order to be the most hire-able.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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