Does Anyone Drive For Swift's Dollar Tree Dedicated Account?

Topic 4742 | Page 1

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Josh E.'s Comment
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I was wondering how it is and if everything the recruiter is offering me is true. Would like to know about your routes, hometime, and average weekly pay.

Thanks!

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
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I was wondering how it is and if everything the recruiter is offering me is true. Would like to know about your routes, hometime, and average weekly pay.

Thanks!

If it is anything like the dedicated Dollar Tree here at JB Hunt, you will be doing a lot of unloading yourself at all the little stores you will be going into in all the small little towns & strip malls. It may pay pretty well, but a lot of manual labor on your part. That is why they try to entice folks with good pay to compensate for all that they don't tell you.

Best bet is to talk to some drivers who is running that account (be it Swift, JB Hunt, Werner, etc) to see if what I am saying is true. I know that is what I found out when I checked into doing that run. I am sure you will find that it doesn't matter what company you drive for doing that account, they all are about the same I am sure.

Ernie

Josh E.'s Comment
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Yeh, the recruiter is being pretty upfront about the unloading part and being away from home two weeks at a time...but how do I know that she's just trying to get me hired and then after Orientation I found out that the dedicated position isn't available?

It sounds good to me because it seems like it's more stable as far as hometime and pay. The only thing is it might get too repetitive, but right now I'm all for stability because it's easier to budget money that way. I'm trying to get debt-free. I really want to do OTR but it can wait until all the bills are paid off.

Thanks Salty!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
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Josh, those jobs are available - I know several rookie students straight out of school that landed those jobs. But, be aware that the reason they are available is that they are tough, and even though they pay well it is hard for the trucking companies to keep them filled because the drivers just get tired of ******* it all day everyday. Not only do they hand unload about 90,000 pounds of freight each week, they have to do some ridiculously challenging backing off of busy streets into tight parking lots with four wheeler idiots trying to beat them in or out of the driveway, and then to add one more thing to their difficulties they have to deal with making sure all their inventory is correct for each of their stops and confirm all of that information with the average Dollar Tree employee, which from what I have heard is sometimes a whole new challenge in itself.

I'm not trying to discourage you, I think it is a great opportunity for the right type of person - Brett did this for a while and made some good money while doing it too. If you can handle it, I'd say go for it!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Josh E.'s Comment
member avatar

Josh, those jobs are available - I know several rookie students straight out of school that landed those jobs. But, be aware that the reason they are available is that they are tough, and even though they pay well it is hard for the trucking companies to keep them filled because the drivers just get tired of ******* it all day everyday. Not only do they hand unload about 90,000 pounds of freight each week, they have to do some ridiculously challenging backing off of busy streets into tight parking lots with four wheeler idiots trying to beat them in or out of the driveway, and then to add one more thing to their difficulties they have to deal with making sure all their inventory is correct for each of their stops and confirm all of that information with the average Dollar Tree employee, which from what I have heard is sometimes a whole new challenge in itself.

I'm not trying to discourage you, I think it is a great opportunity for the right type of person - Brett did this for a while and made some good money while doing it too. If you can handle it, I'd say go for it!

Thanks Old School! I think I could definitely handle it if the money is decent. I was going to go with Cargo Transporters, but the Swift recruiter emailed me this morning and I also heard back from Melton today. Both sound like really good opportunities, especially if I decide to do the GI Bill OJT with Melton. I'm leaning towards Melton because I hear those guys go all over the country, while the Swift dedicated would get to be pretty monotonous I think. But, it also seems more stable in regards to pay and hometime. Decisions, decisions!! lol

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Joseph R.'s Comment
member avatar

I am dealing with the same decision with you Josh

I had a recruiter visit me the last week of my classroom instruction. I'm now on range portion how to maneuver the vehicle. Swift did tell me that I would be stopping and unloading about a dozen times a day. Also lots of backing up in narrow strip malls. The only difference is that they told me is that I would be off for the weekends. The only thing I am worried is also stated, join the company then finding out it is no longer available. I got other companies I like, but with weekends off, this account take the top interest spot. I'm just scared of a bait and switch.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I dont do those accounts but from my experience if they hire you in for that account you will transfer there immediately after training. You really dont have to worry bout bait and switch. Make sure its in WRITING.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Josh E.'s Comment
member avatar

I dont do those accounts but from my experience if they hire you in for that account you will transfer there immediately after training. You really dont have to worry bout bait and switch. Make sure its in WRITING.

I don't exactly have it in writing, just an email conversation. She gave me three options to choose from. When I talked to her on the phone today I told her I only want to go to Orientation if I can be sure I get the dedicated route. She said there's no reason why I couldn't get it because it's available.

Will other companies see a dedicated position as OTR experience?

Thanks!

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Are they doing any type of hire agreement?? As for the dedicated being counted as OTR most compaines look at the nature of the account. I ran a dedicated for 6 months from south Ga to Canada and back. Its been looked at as OTR, but if your just running within the same or another state it may not count . Other more experienced folks can probably shed more light on it .

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Josh E.'s Comment
member avatar

Are they doing any type of hire agreement?? As for the dedicated being counted as OTR most compaines look at the nature of the account. I ran a dedicated for 6 months from south Ga to Canada and back. Its been looked at as OTR, but if your just running within the same or another state it may not count . Other more experienced folks can probably shed more light on it .

She showed me three options to choose from, and I told her the Dollar Tree dedicated, two weeks out and two days home. When I talked to her on the phone, I said "I only want to go to Orientation if I can make sure that I'll get this position." She told me I shouldn't have a problem getting it since it's open. (On the email it said they were looking for 35 drivers). I just don't know, I definitely don't feel entitled to a Dedicated job because I would think the drivers that have already paid their dues would jump all over them, but if a Recruiter tells me that's what I'm getting after training and I don't get it...I'd be pretty upset.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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