Does Anyone Drive For Swift's Dollar Tree Dedicated Account?

Topic 4742 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
MRC's Comment
member avatar

#1. if your that unsure of it ask her for a pre hire letter stating, that particular job opening belongs to you as long as you pass the orientation. #2. If you are this skeptical about the company from the start, you might want to rethink who you want to work for. #3. It's not like everyone wants " This job" I wouldn't . I want drop and hitch, period. So you wanting that account fills that position for the Co. #4 Relax, take a breath and realize that not everyone is out to screw you. Best of luck to you, MRCgood-luck.gif

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Josh, I'm telling you again, those jobs are available. What they will do with you is as soon as orientation is done they will put you with a trainer who is running one of those accounts. You'll do that together with them for about a month, and then they will set you up with your own truck and and area that you will be running in. Most drivers prefer the "drop and hook" work for reasons that you will soon discover doing that job. But this old world takes all kinds to make it work, and if you're one of the types that enjoys a good bit of manual labor mixed in with your driving then you won't have a problem landing one of those jobs.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Josh E.'s Comment
member avatar

Josh, I'm telling you again, those jobs are available. What they will do with you is as soon as orientation is done they will put you with a trainer who is running one of those accounts. You'll do that together with them for about a month, and then they will set you up with your own truck and and area that you will be running in. Most drivers prefer the "drop and hook" work for reasons that you will soon discover doing that job. But this old world takes all kinds to make it work, and if you're one of the types that enjoys a good bit of manual labor mixed in with your driving then you won't have a problem landing one of those jobs.

Yeh, I know I'm being hard-headed...I guess my past experiences with military recruiters has got me a little weary of any 'Recruiters'.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Josh, I ran the Dollar Tree account with US Xpress. Old School is right - you'll never have to worry about a job opening on that account. They'll take all the drivers they can get.

The job is really tough but pays well. Most people don't last long on it. A typical week for me meant unloading 2 trailers - about 90,000 pounds worth of stuff - and driving 2000-2500 miles every 5 days and we were home on weekends. Now let me preface this by saying you won't run those kind of miles because you'll be on electronic logs and I was on paper logs cheating my butt off every day of my life. I also average about 3 hours of sleep every night. Let's just say I figured since I was out there 5 days and home on weekends I might as well just work as hard as I can while I'm out there. So I really took it to the extreme.

What you'll be doing, assuming they still do it the same, is unloading boxes onto the wheel conveyors and they'll roll out of the trailer into the store where store personnel will put it away. You'll be making a lot of stops - usually between 2 and 8 stop on each trailer - you never know.

The two biggest challenges you'll face are:

1) The physical labor is tough. Driving is bad enough without that kind of physical work. It wears people down and there are a lot of relatively minor injuries like crunched fingers, sprained wrists, and headaches from boxes falling on your head.

2) You're going to have to locate and get backed into a lot of different stores in busy plazas. This can be extremely stressful at times. The stores are often in busy, tight areas and the docks are sometimes a nightmare to get backed into. That is...if there are any docks. Some stores don't have any so you're backing down alleyways and such.

It's definitely a really tough gig but I don't see any harm in giving it a shot. If you don't like it they'll switch you to another account. Believe me...that's a common request.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Josh E.'s Comment
member avatar

Josh, I ran the Dollar Tree account with US Xpress. Old School is right - you'll never have to worry about a job opening on that account. They'll take all the drivers they can get.

The job is really tough but pays well. Most people don't last long on it. A typical week for me meant unloading 2 trailers - about 90,000 pounds worth of stuff - and driving 2000-2500 miles every 5 days and we were home on weekends. Now let me preface this by saying you won't run those kind of miles because you'll be on electronic logs and I was on paper logs cheating my butt off every day of my life. I also average about 3 hours of sleep every night. Let's just say I figured since I was out there 5 days and home on weekends I might as well just work as hard as I can while I'm out there. So I really took it to the extreme.

What you'll be doing, assuming they still do it the same, is unloading boxes onto the wheel conveyors and they'll roll out of the trailer into the store where store personnel will put it away. You'll be making a lot of stops - usually between 2 and 8 stop on each trailer - you never know.

The two biggest challenges you'll face are:

1) The physical labor is tough. Driving is bad enough without that kind of physical work. It wears people down and there are a lot of relatively minor injuries like crunched fingers, sprained wrists, and headaches from boxes falling on your head.

2) You're going to have to locate and get backed into a lot of different stores in busy plazas. This can be extremely stressful at times. The stores are often in busy, tight areas and the docks are sometimes a nightmare to get backed into. That is...if there are any docks. Some stores don't have any so you're backing down alleyways and such.

It's definitely a really tough gig but I don't see any harm in giving it a shot. If you don't like it they'll switch you to another account. Believe me...that's a common request.

As long as I can pay the bills and get moved out of my wife's parents house I'll be fine with manual labor. We just moved back from Fort Riley, KS.

So like stated earlier, should I get a hire agreement before orientation or just tell them I want to do the Dollar Tree account?

Thanks y'all!!!!

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
So like stated earlier, should I get a hire agreement before orientation or just tell them I want to do the Dollar Tree account?

If that's the only reason you want to work for that company and you wouldn't work there otherwise then I would say ask for something in writing. I'm really not sure if they'll give it to you or not but it doesn't hurt to ask.

But that's one of those jobs that almost nobody likes and nobody wants to do. You have a handful of guys that are pretty hardcore into it because it's unique and difficult, but 95% of the drivers out there wouldn't want anything to do with it. On top of that, we're approaching the beginning of the holiday season and the people in that account won't have a chance to breathe they'll be so busy. So that is going to help you get in there and get going also.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Billy F.'s Comment
member avatar

I was just offered the same position with Swift and am now questioning whether this will be for me. I'm glad Josh asked the question because I was not sure what the job entailed.

I'm thinking this is one of the few routes available that will offer weekends at home but the fact that the majority of drivers do not want this job or request transfers off of it probably means that I will end up wanting another route as well.

Thanks again for the heads-up on this route.

Bill D. Cat

Josh E.'s Comment
member avatar

I was just offered the same position with Swift and am now questioning whether this will be for me. I'm glad Josh asked the question because I was not sure what the job entailed.

I'm thinking this is one of the few routes available that will offer weekends at home but the fact that the majority of drivers do not want this job or request transfers off of it probably means that I will end up wanting another route as well.

Thanks again for the heads-up on this route.

Bill D. Cat

She did offer one route that was weekends off, but I told her I wanted the one that was 2 weeks out, 2 days home. I don't really need weekends off, it would be nice, but right now I'm just trying to make some decent money and pay off some debt. Then I can think about going OTR or regional , this dedicated account seems perfect with the stability it offers. Then when the bills are paid down I can have some fun driving! haha

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Unity's Comment
member avatar

I know this is old but the sleep comment amazes me! That's extremely impressive mate. Surely caffeine was involved? I naturally get drowsy around the 9-10 hour driving marker so work around that but have used caffeine. My body doesn't handle it well however so I've stoped that and try other methods. Still, I work around my natural 9-10 limit. I aim for 8 hours of sleep but my body normally wakes me up around 6 anyways or it fails completely and I oversleep. Probably not healthy but you do what you can. Had to connect my iPad to the truck speakers a couple times tho just to make sure I wake up lol. Set volume to 30... did its job!

I came in keeping really good management of my time during training and solo OTR but actually ended up having less stress then OTR in the end on a dollar tree account. I was given a 2 unload week also so it became easy for me to manage my runs given I knew about what I was getting back to back. ~500 followed by ~2,200. OTR sometimes gave you really small loads, really long loads, plus waiting for whatever shipper problem they might have. Lots of miles plus good unload pay made the drop from 36cpm to 34cpm a non issue. Was seeing ~$1400 a week.

I ended up relaxing more on making the trips so the unloading became my next focus, followed by backing, then managing load securement given many trailers were rarely properly secured by the dock peeps... I would upload the last pics I took it if I could but not supported it seems. O man, when they had boxes all the way to the back and top...

1.Yup, even given I used to unload trailers back to back daily for a job I used to have, my first unload(2-3 months ago?) was tiring as hell. I haven't played sports since 2009(wrestling, football, cross country/track), nor have I worked out consistently since 2014 given I got sick(went from 198lb to 160lb, heaviest I've ever been being 245lb during football). I almost threw up(well I did a bit in my mouth) and had to sit down for about 30 minutes after I finished my first trailer to not feel like passing out. They told me I unload really well so that kind of gave me some much need mental help to not feel so bad I was dead. I liked it however and took into consideration it'll only get easier the more I unload. Thankfully it did.

I had a box of soap fall in my face and dig my glasses into my skin but have avoided that type of damage ever since changing up my strategy. My most useful one being forming a tunnel so I don't have to extend for as much boxes once your making room to add another roller. One of the store guys was having a blast watching me make a tunnel lol. I have to say however I have spent a good amount of times waiting with the rollers full because they are slow or have 1 person, yeah... 1. I had no reason to fret tho, I'm not really the type to tell people to hurry up even if it would help my check and I was already really happy with my work making good money so it didn't bother me. It bothered me more went I stoped getting the schedule I was promised and slow stores did actually affect my check but I still kept to myself because it's still hard for me to ask people to do stuff like that. It probably helps I don't have many bills or any dependents so I understand some of my fellow employees getting ****ed and showing it given they support a family or what have you. I don't know?

2.O man was I tripping out on some of the stores. I was seriously questioning the sanity of being sent to back to some of these stores. I avoided hassles on the first stop for the first couple runs given I arrive when no one is there. I would just take advantage and back it close given I had lots of time. Lots of pull ups and get outs my friend but the set up made it so much easier once I woke up to unload. Boy if you thought you didn't back enough to practice doing OTR training, this is your gig lol. Sadly you can't always get 1 stop stores or spend time backing(sleep) so it was a lot of pain backing for most all stops. I enjoyed the pain tho given I was one of those student that was asking his trainer to let me back at terminals over and over lol. I got some compliments on my backing but honestly they were probably mostly luck. I feel I still need to get better.

I think I've only gotten ~3? single stops since I started and one I asked for to work in another run into my 70. Not many docks, yup. I enjoyed getting to know the managers/people for each stop tho I'm not really a social person. I enjoyed many jobs I've had simply because I don't deal with people/customers. Not social but there's something to be said to seeing these people multiple times, you get comfortable? They thank you for unloading quick and you exchange nice pleasantries. Gives you energy I guess? Not all stores have pleasant peeps, don't want to give the wrong idea....

Josh, I ran the Dollar Tree account with US Xpress. Old School is right - you'll never have to worry about a job opening on that account. They'll take all the drivers they can get.

The job is really tough but pays well.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Superlejera's Comment
member avatar

Men don't do it . I was doing the dollar tree account for werner.you need to unload 2000+ boxes for one store .the store employee take they sweet ass time .becuase they don't get pay by the trailer like me. that I get pay for every trailer I unload.you can be waiting for hours in one store .sometime I wait 4 hours to unload watch the video below hope it help https://youtu.be/1xAs8wPI6Cw

I was wondering how it is and if everything the recruiter is offering me is true. Would like to know about your routes, hometime, and average weekly pay.

Thanks!

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More