Reports From Company-sponsored Training: Quality Drivers Indianapolis IN

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Adam P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, I saw this add online about this place that first seemed like it was what I was looking for. Free transportation, free room and board, free CDL Permit testing, Free DOT medicial, and free food while I was in training. And I was hooked on the pictures of this place . There was a great looking gym, nice place to eat, a couple pictures of the driving range with nice looking trucks. There is a room with a few tables and flat screen tvs to watch. and the place looked clean by the pictures.

I came up here 30 something days ago really thinking that I made a good choice, hey I would have my CDL in 3 to 4 weeks, and then I would be able to go to the next step of getting a trainer for 6 weeks, and then I would go back and I would have to start teaming with another student for either 6 months or a year and drive for Celadon.

As soon as I got to this great city I was told to call the office and they would send someone out to get me at the bus station after driving 6 hours on the Hound. Not too bad, my bus got me here at 5 30 am on a Sunday morning, I called the office and did not get anyone on the phone till after 8 a.m. when I was told that someone would be here after 10:30 a.m. but as soon as I got here to the dorm they would check me into a room and I could unwind.

Well to say the least , I waited till after 5 p.m. to see about getting a room at the dorm ,and found out that I was going to be bussed about 20 miles away to a hotel and I would have to ride in a van back in forth. Gee what a rude awakening I had to people acting like morons shoving and pushing and just acting like they were on a playground. And it just got worse as soon as I made it to class the first day.

It seemed like a small class of about 60 people, I thought it would be a piece of cake. I really needed help with just backing and double clutching. I all ready had my CDL permit before I came up here and a DOT med card, but I found out that I would have to retake everything regardless plus I would have to start all over and take this States full driving test like I was going to drive a car. By the time I had to go and see about my new Medical card, my blood pressure was way too high from having to deal with all the playground kids up here, plus hearing the horror stories of people being up here up to 12 weeks before they test out.

I did not have high blood pressure till I got up here. I was put on some pills to bring it down but I would have to wait a whole week before they processed my permit. That was on Tuesday of my second week. I waited till the following Monday just to be put on the roll call and to see if I would be going outside for backing in the lot. Now just because my name was on the list did not mean that I would get much backing in, or even a turn. We had to deal with no one getting fuel in the trucks, to trucks breaking down and not getting any time in the seat.

Heck we even had to deal with other students not even being on the list breaking line or being the teachers pet so they could get some extra time backing and if you were luckey that day you might get about 15 minutes of seat time after waiting about 4 hours. But it get worse, they take out 4 students at a time for road time now this is like a 4 hour period of time, but we all have to do the 4 point break check, and in cab inspection which cuts drive time down, and once that is over you would be lucky to get about 30 minutes of drive time behind the wheel.

I am trying to keep my head above the water to say the least, I ran out of happy pills so there is no smiles on my face, and I am one of the few that beleives that there should be no drinking while in training. Now if this place would go around and test everyone to see if they have been drinking,and get rid of the people that have, things would move faster. I drove with someone else for over a month but without learning how to do all of the backing in order to pass my CDL, I would not be here. And since I drove before, I have to bring myself down to a lower gear while clutching.

Good luck all

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Ok Adam we have a few things to cover here.

First of all we've heard other stories from students stating that Celadon's training program has been overcrowded and disorganized. There are long wait times to get in trucks and things of that nature as you've mentioned. So I know that's an issue they're hopefully working through but I can tell you it's not uncommon at large companies with these type of training programs. That's just part of the deal and you have to roll with it. Anytime you're dealing with large entities like corporations, governments, and militaries there will be a lot of red tape, long wait times, and plenty of confusion. It's just par for the course unfortunately. But I know that what you're saying is true.

That being said, you've taken an approach that is quite common but rarely ends well in these type of endeavors and that is you're worrying about all the things you can't control instead of focusing on doing everything you can to demonstrate that you're serious about this career and about successfully completing this program. Of course there are going to be policies, people, and procedures you're not too thrilled with. Sometimes it might even be downright aggravating. But nowhere in the fine print did it say you would enjoy yourself every moment and be treated like you're a high roller in Vegas. You're there to earn a job and start a new career with a company that is willing to invest their time and money up front to get you where you want to go. In return you should have the attitude that you're going to do anything you can to take advantage of such a great opportunity. But it sounds more like you'll do anything it takes as long as you're comfortable, you're getting the time in the trucks you feel you should get, you're in class with classmates you like, everything is well organized, you stay in the preferred hotel, and everything goes according to your expectations.

Well here's the thing.....almost nothing in trucking ever, ever, ever goes the way you expect it to. You're always breaking down or getting stuck in traffic. Schedules get changed, trucks get swapped out, and home time gets delayed. Dispatch assigns the wrong loads, shippers forget to schedule drivers, and the DOT sets up checkpoints at the most unfortunate times and places. The weather turns lousy, you suddenly get a terrible cold, and your miles suddenly drop off for whatever reason.

That's trucking. It's the same for everyone.

Now here's the thing most people don't realize. These companies are testing you all the time. They're watching every student like a hawk. You think they don't know what's going on with you and your classmates? Of course they do. You think they're doing their best to make sure you're happy and comfortable? Heck no they're not. In fact they know there are a lot of aspects of their schooling that are frustrating for the students. That's part of the test.

What they're doing is watching everyone to see who has the patience and determination to make it in this industry. They want to know who really wants it. They know ahead of time that at least 50%-75% of the students they bring in will not go on to be solo drivers for the company. Probably 25% will never even spend one day on the road with the company. They bring in everyone they can and they sift through the candidates, keeping the ones they feel are worth their time and money. They have a business to run. They exist to turn a profit. So they're not going to throw money out the window on people that will never pan out.

So all of these long waiting times, schedule changes, distant hotels, abrasive personalities, piles of paperwork, etc - they're using that to gauge the character and determination of the students they've brought in. If they wanted to run the program like they're hosting a bunch of high rollers in Vegas they would. But creating an environment that requires patience, flexibility, and determination to get through it is one of the ways they separate the best from the rest.

So the best thing you can do for yourself is wake up each morning with a clear mind and no expectations. Just do whatever you're asked to do each moment of each day and do it with a smile knowing it's getting you closer to your goal. You mentioned that certain drivers are "teacher's pets", right? Well as I see it, those are the guys that get it. They understand what it takes to get through the program and they're excited about the opportunity. They're working hard, getting along with people, and making their way toward their goals. Right now they have a much better chance at being successful than you do so it's time to turn that around for yourself.

Approach every situation you face as a test of your resolve and patience. Trust me....more of this is being done on purpose than any of the students are aware of. I'll promise you this....if you think this schooling is trying your patience then you're going to be miserable out on the road. This is nothing. Wait til you start getting cut off and flipped off in traffic everyday, treated like garbage for no reason by customers, and have to endure the myriad of challenges and circumstances you can't control out there. It's one h*ll of a tough and thankless job. You've gotta do it because you love the idea of driving a big rig around the country, not because you're going to make a lot of money or be treated very well.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Ok Adam we have a few things to cover here.

First of all we've heard other stories from students stating that Celadon's training program has been overcrowded and disorganized. There are long wait times to get in trucks and things of that nature as you've mentioned. So I know that's an issue they're hopefully working through but I can tell you it's not uncommon at large companies with these type of training programs. That's just part of the deal and you have to roll with it. Anytime you're dealing with large entities like corporations, governments, and militaries there will be a lot of red tape, long wait times, and plenty of confusion. It's just par for the course unfortunately. But I know that what you're saying is true.

That being said, you've taken an approach that is quite common but rarely ends well in these type of endeavors and that is you're worrying about all the things you can't control instead of focusing on doing everything you can to demonstrate that you're serious about this career and about successfully completing this program. Of course there are going to be policies, people, and procedures you're not too thrilled with. Sometimes it might even be downright aggravating. But nowhere in the fine print did it say you would enjoy yourself every moment and be treated like you're a high roller in Vegas. You're there to earn a job and start a new career with a company that is willing to invest their time and money up front to get you where you want to go. In return you should have the attitude that you're going to do anything you can to take advantage of such a great opportunity. But it sounds more like you'll do anything it takes as long as you're comfortable, you're getting the time in the trucks you feel you should get, you're in class with classmates you like, everything is well organized, you stay in the preferred hotel, and everything goes according to your expectations.

Well here's the thing.....almost nothing in trucking ever, ever, ever goes the way you expect it to. You're always breaking down or getting stuck in traffic. Schedules get changed, trucks get swapped out, and home time gets delayed. Dispatch assigns the wrong loads, shippers forget to schedule drivers, and the DOT sets up checkpoints at the most unfortunate times and places. The weather turns lousy, you suddenly get a terrible cold, and your miles suddenly drop off for whatever reason.

That's trucking. It's the same for everyone.

Now here's the thing most people don't realize. These companies are testing you all the time. They're watching every student like a hawk. You think they don't know what's going on with you and your classmates? Of course they do. You think they're doing their best to make sure you're happy and comfortable? Heck no they're not. In fact they know there are a lot of aspects of their schooling that are frustrating for the students. That's part of the test.

What they're doing is watching everyone to see who has the patience and determination to make it in this industry. They want to know who really wants it. They know ahead of time that at least 50%-75% of the students they bring in will not go on to be solo drivers for the company. Probably 25% will never even spend one day on the road with the company. They bring in everyone they can and they sift through the candidates, keeping the ones they feel are worth their time and money. They have a business to run. They exist to turn a profit. So they're not going to throw money out the window on people that will never pan out.

So all of these long waiting times, schedule changes, distant hotels, abrasive personalities, piles of paperwork, etc - they're using that to gauge the character and determination of the students they've brought in. If they wanted to run the program like they're hosting a bunch of high rollers in Vegas they would. But creating an environment that requires patience, flexibility, and determination to get through it is one of the ways they separate the best from the rest.

So the best thing you can do for yourself is wake up each morning with a clear mind and no expectations. Just do whatever you're asked to do each moment of each day and do it with a smile knowing it's getting you closer to your goal. You mentioned that certain drivers are "teacher's pets", right? Well as I see it, those are the guys that get it. They understand what it takes to get through the program and they're excited about the opportunity. They're working hard, getting along with people, and making their way toward their goals. Right now they have a much better chance at being successful than you do so it's time to turn that around for yourself.

Approach every situation you face as a test of your resolve and patience. Trust me....more of this is being done on purpose than any of the students are aware of. I'll promise you this....if you think this schooling is trying your patience then you're going to be miserable out on the road. This is nothing. Wait til you start getting cut off and flipped off in traffic everyday, treated like garbage for no reason by customers, and have to endure the myriad of challenges and circumstances you can't control out there. It's one h*ll of a tough and thankless job. You've gotta do it because you love the idea of driving a big rig around the country, not because you're going to make a lot of money or be treated very well.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Estben's Comment
member avatar

I'm with you Adam i was there 2 1/2 weeks and walked. I don't think anybody was asking to be treated "like High rollers" the food wasn't great but it was edible. The rooms again adequate, with the exception of possible bedbugs. The teachers pets were generally the clowns that weren't as serious and the ones causing the problems. There is now way anyone could convince me that this is Celadon way of consciously testing drivers, I think its a combination of a volume/revenue generator for them, a shortage of drivers and 90% turnover in the industry,

However that being said after thinking about my experience their. It will be the teachers pets getting better loads from dispatchers and getting away with bending the rules to the limit. I been working since I was thirteen and politics trumps hard work every time.

I like the idea of driving, autonomy (not being micro managed), problem solving and not going to the same place every day doing the same thing. However It made me realize maybe this isn't for me. I've never been a kiss a$$, I always work hard, try to do the best job I can and give more than 100%, I tend to follow the rules its just the way I'm wired, I couldn't lie my way out of a wet paper bag.

I also read the article on tips to rookie drivers. I guess somebody reported their trainer for smoking pot, the word rat was used throughout the article and it stated a couple of times that in this case the trainee was justified. Now I don't care what people do in there off time or who they do it with as long as its a consenting participant. But I do not want to be on the road with or riding in the front of 80, 000 lbs with with somebody whose smoking pot, drinking, or is sleep deprived. But if this is the nature of the beast I want to go in with my eyes open.

After reading Bretts book and another book on truck driving I got excited and maybe threw caution to the wind. I'm going to read more of the blog articles reevaluate and maybe go to a private school if I decide to pursue this any further.

Good luck Adam

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I'm with you Adam i was there 2 1/2 weeks and walked

Why did you walk? You never really said.

I think its a combination of a volume/revenue generator for them, a shortage of drivers and 90% turnover in the industry

You think? Can you verify any of this or explain the business model they're using to generate revenues from their school?

I been working since I was thirteen and politics trumps hard work every time.

We've all had others chosen over us because of politics at some point but I certainly got where I am from hard work, not politics. I think the overwhelming majority of successful people would say the same thing.

The rooms again adequate, with the exception of possible bedbugs

Possible bedbugs? Again, can you verify this or are we just blowing smoke out of frustration?

Listen, you guys can say anything you like but remember the golden rule of TruckingTruth - if you're going to slam companies, schools, or individuals you have to be able to back it up with facts and substantiated opinions. If you can't do that then you don't know what you're talking about and you shouldn't be giving unsubstantiated negative opinions or advice to anyone. So let's drop stuff like "possible bedbugs" and projections about speculative revenue generation and stick with the pertinent facts.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Charles M.'s Comment
member avatar

i'm headed up to Indy in a week and a half for training and I get both sides of the coin. My impression about most of the schools is that your best learning comes when you're out with your trainer for six weeks, but you you still have to get your CDL-A before you can do that. Being a complete rookie (hell, I've never even sat in tractor), will I get enough time behind the wheel to be able to pass the driving test? Just my humble opinion, but I think even with this less than sterling report, I'm still better off than with the other two choices of company schools I had.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Adam P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, I saw this add online about this place that first seemed like it was what I was looking for. Free transportation, free room and board, free CDL Permit testing, Free DOT medicial, and free food while I was in training. And I was hooked on the pictures of this place . There was a great looking gym, nice place to eat, a couple pictures of the driving range with nice looking trucks. There is a room with a few tables and flat screen tvs to watch. and the place looked clean by the pictures. I came up here 30 something days ago really thinking that I made a good choice, hey I would have my CDL in 3 to 4 weeks, and then I would be able to go to the next step of getting a trainer for 6 weeks, and then I would go back and I would have to start teaming with another student for either 6 months or a year and drive for Celadon. As soon as I got to this great city I was told to call the office and they would send someone out to get me at the bus station after driving 6 hours on the Hound. Not too bad, my bus got me here at 5 30 am on a Sunday morning, I called the office and did not get anyone on the phone till after 8 a.m. when I was told that someone would be here after 10:30 a.m. but as soon as I got here to the dorm they would check me into a room and I could unwind. Well to say the least , I waited till after 5 p.m. to see about getting a room at the dorm ,and found out that I was going to be bussed about 20 miles away to a hotel and I would have to ride in a van back in forth. Gee what a rude awakening I had to people acting like morons shoving and pushing and just acting like they were on a playground. And it just got worse as soon as I made it to class the first day. It seemed like a small class of about 60 people, I thought it would be a piece of cake. I really needed help with just backing and double clutching. I all ready had my CDL permit before I came up here and a DOT med card, but I found out that I would have to retake everything regardless plus I would have to start all over and take this States full driving test like I was going to drive a car. By the time I had to go and see abot my new Medicial card, my blood pressure was way too high from having to deal with all the playground kids up here, plus hearing the horror stories of people being up here up to 12 weeks before they test out. I did not have high blood pressure till I got up here. I was put on some pills to bring it down but I would have to wait a whole week before they processed my permit. That was on Tuesday of my second week. I waited till the following Monday just to be put on the roll call and to see if I would be going outside for backing in the lot. Now just because my name was on the list did not mean that I would get much backing in, or even a turn. We had to deal with no one getting fuel in the trucks, to trucks breaking down and not getting any time in the seat. Heck we even had to deal with other students not even being on the list breaking line or being the teachers pet so they could get some extra time backing and if you were luckey that day you might get about 15 minutes of seat time after waiting about 4 hours. But it get worse, they take out 4 students at a time for road time now this is like a 4 hour period of time, but we all have to do the 4 point break check, and in cab inspection which cuts drive time down, and once that is over you would be lucky to get about 30 minutes of drive time behind the wheel. I am trying to keep my head above the water to say the least, I ran out of happy pills so there is no smiles on my face, and I am one of the few that belives that there should be no drinking while in training. Now if this place would go around and test everyone to see if they have been drinking,and get rid of the people that have, things would move faster. I drove with someone else for over a month but without learning how to do all of the backing in order to pass my CDL, I would not be here. And since I drove before, I have to bring myself down to a lower gear while clutching. Good luck all

Things are getting a little bit better around here, they have been making it easier for others to test out and get thier CDLs . And I have been doing everything to get in line and show everyone that I am serious about getting my CDL as well. My main problem is backing. I was having problems in finding my cones and knowing which ones to aim in which mirror and which ones to drive towards. But I am getting the hang of it all..

If you decide to come up here , bring plenty of warm clothes and a extra blanket and whatever you need. The weather is changeing regardless . They did open up another Test sight so more students will be able to test out sooner, and the instructors are starting to be more open if you have any problems with what you are not getting right. I made some great friends up here and with thier help I know that I can get thru this part of training....

I will stay in touch from time to time , It is time for me to step on a few toes and get in line for some extra backing time if that is possible.. Keep on trucking Yall !!!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Charles M.'s Comment
member avatar

This is encouraging-- I go there in one week

Old School's Comment
member avatar

You know what Adam? You sound much better this time around... I'm actually very proud of you. I bit my tongue when you first posted this thread and decided to hold off a bit before I jumped in here. You have surprised and impressed me with your tenacity to endure a difficult situation and not give in to adopting the prevalent bad attitude that I'm sure is present at that place. You are going to make a trucker after all if you continue on your chosen path.

I salute you! Hang in there, and see it through.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
And I have been doing everything to get in line and show everyone that I am serious about getting my CDL as well

Amen brutha! I agree with Old School....you sound completely different this time and that's awesome to hear! Nothing is more heartbreaking than to watch new people come into the industry and fail to get their career off to a great start. Soooooo many people that could have gone on to have a really enjoyable and productive career never make it out of training and it kills me to see that. That's exactly why I started this website in the first place....to let people know what to expect during those first few months and give them a strategy to succeed. Myself and the other experienced drivers were very concerned when you first chimed in but I'm confident you've figured it out now and you're well on your way to making it through their program successfully.

So keep working hard, keep smiling and making friends, and keep that positive attitude. Your attitude will have a far greater effect on the outcome of all of this than the speed you learn at. Anyone that's ever taught anything will tell you that they'd rather teach someone with a great attitude and limited talent than someone with all the talent in the world but the wrong attitude. If you'll make sure you're the type of student they're looking for, they'll make sure you get the training you need and everything will work out great for ya!

Go get em! And don't forget to stop by and keep us updated!

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Adam P.'s Comment
member avatar
I passed my Class A Cdl with doubles and triples, and tanker. In a way I am really glad that I stuck it out all the way . Yes it was a long jounrey, It rained a lot up here but I stayed out on the ranges, and now we are seeing snow , and I will be outside helping others learn thier In cab inspection, 4 point break check, and pre trip just to have something to do till I get my trainer and head out on the road.. I look back on everything I wrote about this place, I can not take back the things I said but I can help them make changes to make it better here for students that decide to come here. I talked to a lot of other students who went to other schools , and heard horror stories of other places. This has become my home away from home, I met a lot of great people and in a way they helped me to live my DREAM.. In closeing if you really want to get your CDL , and you are willing to work for it come to Quality Drivers..Yes it was free !!!!! Free transportation, free food, a free place to stay, and it only cost me some time,,Take care out there and be safe..

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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