Rookie Driver Becoming A Owner Operator Without Hesitation

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movingmetal's Comment
member avatar

Ive been on this site before I ever even gained my cdl A. You see a lot of people on here talk about what they are going to do and blah blah. The ones posting the most don't even earn their cdl. They're too busy rambling. I got mine like I said I was going to do. I now have over 10000 miles of strictly north Carolina to maine and back. Ive drove 220 81 84 95 684 91 87 and whatever you call all those routes im sure I did them all so on and back and then back again. Went through gw and tapazee. Will I be a owner op? Yes. Will I be successful? Yes. Just drive the dag on truck and make money man. Too many people think way to much into this. Be safe and just drive the truck man. I mean this isnt rocket science. Should I be owner op or not lol? I think so

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!
I aint no stranger coming in to this. Im not just a random joe going from a honda civic into towing trailers. I do have experience prior on busy crazy roads and highways for 3 years.

Classic mistake of thinking that because you know how to do a job you should become a business owner. That's the #1 reason in my opinion that businesses fail....because people run their businesses as if it's only a job. They wake up, do the job, eat dinner, and go to bed. Doing the job is the easy part of owning and operating a business. It's everything else you have to do besides producing your product or service that makes or breaks a business and you have no experience running a trucking business.

In sports you'll often find people who make that mistake. They think because they were great players it must mean they can coach, recruit, draft, manage personnel, and maybe even own the team outright. And most of them fail miserably. Michael Jordan was the greatest player of all time but has been an embarrassment as a General Manager and owner. Matt Millen was a Hall of Fame player who took a shot at being the General Manager of the Detroit Lions and it went horribly. There are a thousand examples of this.

Well, we've shared our experiences and you know our feelings on it. Time for you to pony up your life savings, setup some financing that will lock you in for years, and roll the dice. Hey, it can only end two ways right? You'll either succeed like about 5% of the people have or you'll run away screaming like the other 95%. So what the heck...go for it!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PJ's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Well you seem to be doing good for yourself. Not sure by your post your a true o/o or lease purchase operator. Everyone here has different goals/objectives and experience levels. The information provided is based on personal experience's and life experience both inside and outside this industry. I have done both company and lease. They are very different to put it mildly. For me the lease is working, but I also know first hand how much more time, trouble, and effort I put into it to be successful. All loads pay different. All companies run their programs differently. Folks getting in on the ground floor with no previous experience have enough to learn getting started without all the other stuff to worry about. The biggest problem I see over and over with lease program failures is the person has no clue how to run a business, and thinks they can do what they want. They tend to get very picky about loads and turn down loads they feel are not worth their time and take too much time off. Next thing you know they are in the hole and having their lease terminated. I make good money yes, but I also have the responsibility if it breaks down. Motels are out of my pocket, no breakfown pay either. If the wheels ain't turnin you ain't makin money. I stick money back every week in maintance and an emergency account. I have needed both at times. No one here will say no way, never do it. It's all about providing honest information for folks to make an informed decision for themselves. I may sound harsh, I just think your providing a slanted view instead of a full picture so far in your posts. I apologize if I am misunderstanding you. I hope all goes well for you.

Ray C.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!
double-quotes-start.png

I aint no stranger coming in to this. Im not just a random joe going from a honda civic into towing trailers. I do have experience prior on busy crazy roads and highways for 3 years.

double-quotes-end.png

Classic mistake of thinking that because you know how to do a job you should become a business owner. That's the #1 reason in my opinion that businesses fail....because people run their businesses as if it's only a job. They wake up, do the job, eat dinner, and go to bed. Doing the job is the easy part of owning and operating a business. It's everything else you have to do besides producing your product or service that makes or breaks a business and you have no experience running a trucking business.

In sports you'll often find people who make that mistake. They think because they were great players it must mean they can coach, recruit, draft, manage personnel, and maybe even own the team outright. And most of them fail miserably. Michael Jordan was the greatest player of all time but has been an embarrassment as a General Manager and owner. Matt Millen was a Hall of Fame player who took a shot at being the General Manager of the Detroit Lions and it went horribly. There are a thousand examples of this.

Well, we've shared our experiences and you know our feelings on it. Time for you to pony up your life savings, setup some financing that will lock you in for years, and roll the dice. Hey, it can only end two ways right? You'll either succeed like about 5% of the people have or you'll run away screaming like the other 95%. So what the heck...go for it!

I have to agree with Brett. I spent 18 years managing businesses for other people making them money so I know that aspect. I have my CDL now and would like to own my own truck someday and have the business background to support that should it happen. Owning a truck is not about just driving it...it is about knowing when to eat tuna from a can and when you can splurge on that one steak dinner you treat yourself to when times are good. But only one because money in the bank is what matters when you run your own business. Fluctuating fuel prices, supply and demand, economic cycles both world and domestic will all need to be considered if you own your own truck. Also flexibility...can you jump from one endorsement to another when you experience a downturn? Good luck to you but running full speed into something that takes way more than shifting gears and passing other trucks may take a little more foresight than what you have put into it thus far.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Dont be discouraged, do your research, talk to O/O's that have found success. It's possible to be a successful Owner Operator given the right environment. Msg me privately if you have questions. I'm an Owner Operator and I net 9k easily, obviously my gross is much higher but expenses can get pretty high.

I have some questions for you:

1) What would you consider "being successful" as an Owner Operator? How much profit would you have to make in a year to justify the added risk and work involved in owning that truck? And by "profit" I mean "taxable income" after every last deduction on your Federal taxes.

2) How much home time do you get in the process of making those earnings?

3) What do you mean when you say "I net 9k easily"? In what period of time? And define what you mean by "net" because a lot of people confuse net earnings with revenues, cash flow, or gross profit. So I want to make sure we're talking about the same thing.

4) What is your average cost per mile to operate the business? Roughly what are your maintenance costs per mile? What are your fuel expenses per mile?

5) How many years have you been a successful owner operator by your definition of successful?

6) Why do you feel there's been such a big dropoff in the number of owner operators over the past three decades?

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
movingmetal's Comment
member avatar

All the doubters saying you barely make more? Lol that's a lie. Im in the left lane steam rolling past company drivers for over a dollar per mile. My overhead is paid in one load. If you have some balls you make a lot more money as a owner operator.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

PJ's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Well you seem to be doing good for yourself. Not sure by your post your a true o/o or lease purchase operator. Everyone here has different goals/objectives and experience levels. The information provided is based on personal experience's and life experience both inside and outside this industry. I have done both company and lease. They are very different to put it mildly. For me the lease is working, but I also know first hand how much more time, trouble, and effort I put into it to be successful. All loads pay different. All companies run their programs differently. Folks getting in on the ground floor with no previous experience have enough to learn getting started without all the other stuff to worry about. The biggest problem I see over and over with lease program failures is the person has no clue how to run a business, and thinks they can do what they want. They tend to get very picky about loads and turn down loads they feel are not worth their time and take too much time off. Next thing you know they are in the hole and having their lease terminated. I make good money yes, but I also have the responsibility if it breaks down. Motels are out of my pocket, no breakfown pay either. If the wheels ain't turnin you ain't makin money. I stick money back every week in maintance and an emergency account. I have needed both at times. No one here will say no way, never do it. It's all about providing honest information for folks to make an informed decision for themselves. I may sound harsh, I just think your providing a slanted view instead of a full picture so far in your posts. I apologize if I am misunderstanding you. I hope all goes well for you.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I too at times steam roll in the left lane, as you call it. But that extra fuel is coming out of my pocket. Is it worth it? Sometimes it is, others no way. i pickup a full half mile to a gallon in fuel mileage backing off and running 65 mph vs 70 mph. Do the math based on your trip miles. If I need to run hard I do, but it's based on a sound business decision, not my own ego. Yes I can save time on my 70 hr clock and get an average 800 mile load in for the week doing so, but unless I know I will get that load its not worth it to me. It's not about balls or ego. It's about being smart and using your brain to make good business decisions.

movingmetal's Comment
member avatar

You make a lot of sense and thats the reply I was looking for. I know I can do this :)

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Movingmetal, obviously you're trying to drum up some kind of trouble or something....I don't know, and I don't really care. Anyone who comes in here insulting people with "You see a lot of people on here talk about what they are going to do and blah blah. The ones posting the most don't even earn their cdl. They're too busy rambling" and dumb statements like "Will I be a owner op? Yes. Will I be successful? Yes. Just drive the dag on truck and make money man. Too many people think way to much into this" aren't worth the time or trouble. Good luck to you in your adventures. You obviously didn't come here looking for advice, which is good, because I have no interest in trying to steer you in a better direction. You wouldn't listen anyhow. You're a blowhard. You've accomplished nothing in this industry and yet you know it all. That always ends the same way.

Next!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Moving Metal, it's great to have you back in here, but man I've got to point out a few things based on your post. You boast about having over 10,000 miles under your belt - come on man that's silly. Crossing the GW and the Tappan Zee are hardly qualifications for being a successful owner/operator! I love to see a risk taker make it in life, I've been one all my life, and I have owned a lot of trucks. I'm just going to warn you that you sound so much like the people I see go full force ahead and then burn out fast and hard.

You've got so much to learn yet, and a little humility will go a long way in helping your career.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I wish you all the best, I am just being honest. There are days my stress meter is maxed out, and days I love my decision. For me at this point in my life it's right. will that change over time, sure. Life is a fluid vehicle travelling through life. Just go into this decision as you should any other. Eyes wide open. Best wishes too you

movingmetal's Comment
member avatar

Running 65 in the right lane works nice at 3am on cruise control or middle lane. Company trucks are struggling to climb hills and slow. During the day its impossible to run at 65. I find myself barreling down the left lane passing a whole convoy of trucks to get back over to right lane so 4 wheelers can run 75 80. Its left lane pass get over or run 55-60 all day in a 65 70 mph zone. Company drivers are pretty much cemented in that right lane. They can't pass anyone anyways. I'll be a owner op and take my chances.

movingmetal's Comment
member avatar

I'll keep yall posted brett and old school how it works out for me. I definitely want advice. Dont get me wrong. I'm just letting yall know my plans and my story so far. Nothing wrong with ambition. I've seen enough to know I can make more leasing a truck.

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