What Would You Do?

Topic 7200 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

Ok so let me lay out the scenario for you that I came across.

It was around 4am so still get dark out. I'm traveling west on the mass pike just east of Springfield. Two lane road and I come up on a YRC truck pulling doubles. I notice right away something wrong. His rear trailer has no lights. No brake lights, no markers, nothing. I make my pass quickly because we're going uphill and in always ten times faster than doubles going up. I wanted to warn him but I didn't want to lose momentum plus I had a line of cars behind me. I also have no cb in the truck. So I have my head set and called YRC dispatch to let them know to call that driver.

Now I pose a couple questions. First. How would you have handled it or would you even bother? Also this eats at me, do you think I got that driver in trouble by calling dispatch? I don't want that but I also didn't want him to get a ticket. That was the only way I could think of to help him out.

Thoughts?

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Weatherman's Comment
member avatar

You did the right thing. Always err on the side of safety, I say. Personally, I always let a driver know if there's a problem with his/her equipment when possible.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Heavy C, this actually happened to me once, only I was the driver who had his trailer lights out. Somehow my pig tail had gotten strained in a sharp turn or something and pulled loose, but was still in the socket. It was just getting dark and I had not noticed it yet. Another driver pulled up next to me on the highway and stayed there even with me until I looked over at him. As soon as we made eye contact he started making hand signals to me, and remarkably I understood his sign language - so I pulled over just as quick as I could safely do so and corrected the problem.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Michael V.'s Comment
member avatar

I always had a cb on when driving and turned it off after i parked.

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

Problem with a cb is our trucks don't have them and we rotate trucks so I'm certainly not buying one to keep switching which truck it's in.

David's Comment
member avatar

I always had a cb on when driving and turned it off after i parked.

not everyone has them, some drivers in day cabs dont have em either especially tho's that slip seat or bounce from trucks.

Heavy, I'd have done the same.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

You might consider getting a little hand-held CB or something. Let me tell ya.....it's only a matter of time before you wind up in a situation where you desperately need a CB. There might be something dangerously wrong with your equipment one day that you're not aware of and a 10 second warning over the CB could be a life saver.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Problem with a cb is our trucks don't have them and we rotate trucks so I'm certainly not buying one to keep switching which truck it's in.

I've got a Cobra 29LX (with both pigtail & cig lighter power cords), and Wilson W1000 mag-mount antenna that I can install in a vehicle in under 5 minutes.

I don't think you're a snitch - you were tying to be a friend and help another driver out. And by helping him get the situation resolved - in addition to perhaps preventing him from getting pulled over - you may have prevented some drunk/inattentive driver from ending up as part of his ICC Bumper.

Rick

Woody's Comment
member avatar

I work for YRC and doubt that you got anyone in trouble. Doesn't matter how many times drivers check them those darn pig tails between the trailers can find a way to work loose.

To add another level of learning to this thread for new drivers I'll add that he may have known the lights were out. I say this because I've had it happen a couple times but in one case I did not immediately pull over. I was going from Indianapolis to charleston WV traveling on US35. I was on the section that is two lanes and winding road with no shoulder. Now there are a couple of places that I could stop but I decided it was actually more safe to keep going and wait until it was back to split 4 lane. At either of the available places I would have had to come to a very slow speed before pulling off. This on a road where most trucks are doing sixty and no where for them to go if they did not notice me with my lights out.

I HATE driving with no lights on a trailer but in this case there was no way i was going to take the chance of pulling over. Sometimes you have to weigh the risks and do something you normally would not do because it is actually the safer action.

BTW Heavy most drivers would appreciate you going out of your way to try and keep people safe.

Woody

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More