1-year Requirement For New US DL Holder To Get CDL?

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Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

My husband is a new immigrant in the US and he's interested in getting his CDL. He's been a licensed driver in his home country for almost ten years but he just received his US DL last December. I've read something about a one-year requirement for the potential CDL driver to have had his non-commercial license for one year before he can obtain a CDL. Is that true across the board or does it vary by company/state? Thanks in advance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Gary E.'s Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

My husband is a new immigrant in the US and he's interested in getting his CDL. He's been a licensed driver in his home country for almost ten years but he just received his US DL last December. I've read something about a one-year requirement for the potential CDL driver to have had his non-commercial license for one year before he can obtain a CDL. Is that true across the board or does it vary by company/state? Thanks in advance.

Hi Amanda, I researched this a lot when I came over from the UK 2 years ago. Yes, it is a requirement by every company I found except one. USA Truck and PAM have an arrangement with a company called Driver Solutions that will allow you in schooling for your CDL after only 9 months of having held the US driving license. I tried this company but did not like the way they ran the course. Too many students to instructors and very old equipment, I left the course after only 1 day, no fee to pay. In the end I waited out the 12 months and now drive for Prime Inc. Great training and one of the best pay structures around. Hopes this helps

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

but he seems to think CDL school is a piece of cake.

Oh goodness. This caused me grief.

Amanda, please understand that I come from a good place, with nothing but the utmost concern for you, your husband, and the motoring public.

Your husband is the most dangerous driver out on the road. There is nothing more dangerous than a student driver who is underestimating the job, his equipment, and the possible consequences a mistake in a rig can make.

I was an instructor, and my student did underestimate the job. He thought he was above it and he can handle it - piece of cake he told me. This same guy almost took out an entire fuel island, switched lanes improperly and almost ran over a car. He was a liability - just like your husband.

There is nothing easy about this job, and especially trucking school. He ego will be damaged when he struggles to shift gears, or when he comes inches from hitting that pole.

I too underestimated school. I was a stubborn 21 year old kid. Believe it or not, but I injured three classmates. I took off from a hill wrong and caused the truck to bounce like an earthquake and my students had sore necks for days because of that.

Please, tell your husband it's not a cakewalk. None of it is!

You'll have to wait a year, and in this year I hope he screws his head on right. Take it from me, I was in his shoes and now I'm experienced and an instructor/trainer. Your husband is going to get someone hurt if he continues with this idea that it's a cakewalk.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Believe me Daniel, I hear you.

I think some of the blame goes to the schools, companies and recruiters who promise the world. Someone like my husband who is a recent immigrant and concerned about his English and ability to get hired has jumped on that. He was in a semi-professional job in his home country and I think he has a bit of feeling that blue-collar work is automatically easy.

I was happy to hear about the one-year requirement because it would give him time to do The High Road program and get prepared. But he just talked to someone from CR England and he said that FL would let him get his CDL here now and then transfer it to NY.

He wants to begin school on March 9th. To complicate things, I'm up for a job in NYC and if I got it, I'd be starting mid-March.

I just wish he trusted me and the very thorough independent research I've done on this as much as he trusts the recruiters. I was against OTR but I'm absolutely NOT against LTL. I just want him to succeed.

Sorry this turned into a vent.

You would have to PROVE RESIDENCY in FL, in order to get a CDL (or any license). Not that difficult to do really - a few utility bills or pieces of mail, and/or an affidavit from your landlord.

LTL off the bat - might be a little more difficult - especially with lack of previous driving history - and lack of verifiable WORK HISTORY. He may have to go OTR for a bit - before he can really start looking for local/LTL work (though nothing is impossible).

Most people say a year of US licensure, in order to develop that history and residency.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

He wanted to verify the one-year non commercial DL requirement by talking to someone so I found the number of a recruiter for CR England. From what I've read, CR England is pretty much bottom of the barrel for driver requirements, so I figured the recruiter would tell him "sorry, have to wait one year," he'd finally accept that he couldn't get it until December and it would buy us time to research and study.

Well, that backfired on me. The recruiter told him that FL has no such requirement. He said, "but my wife is up for a great job in NYC." And she advised him to get his CDL in FL and then transfer it to NY and then he could apparently get hired (I'm skeptical about that).

So he all of the sudden was all pumped to start school on March 9th. I tried to point out all of the logistical issues with that (pre-hires, his work history is all in a different country+a employment due to immigration, he hasn't done any studying and knows nothing about trucking, LTL is VERY competitive for rookies and he needs to have his act together to have a shot) and it was like talking to a brick wall.

After lots of arguing and some tears on my part, he agreed to start The High Road, read CDL training diaries and read 6 string's linehaul post (all 22 pages of it). He's working on The High Road materials right now. He just asked me what an upgrade was or something like that. He does say he likes this website.

Are there any truckers on here (esp LTL) who would be willing to call him and give him a first-hand perspective of the industry?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I havent been able to find any proof of it being a year although I've read that as well, Id suggest calling the state you reside in and checking with them, as well as a couple "starter companies" such as swift, CR England, prime, and seeing if they have any requirements.

Gary E.'s Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

My husband is a new immigrant in the US and he's interested in getting his CDL. He's been a licensed driver in his home country for almost ten years but he just received his US DL last December. I've read something about a one-year requirement for the potential CDL driver to have had his non-commercial license for one year before he can obtain a CDL. Is that true across the board or does it vary by company/state? Thanks in advance.

Hi Amanda, I researched this a lot when I came over from the UK 2 years ago. Yes, it is a requirement by every company I found except one. USA Truck and PAM have an arrangement with a company called Driver Solutions that will allow you in schooling for your CDL after only 9 months of having held the US driving license. I tried this company but did not like the way they ran the course. Too many students to instructors and very old equipment, I left the course after only 1 day, no fee to pay. In the end I waited out the 12 months and now drive for Prime Inc. Great training and one of the best pay structures around. Hopes this helps

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for the information Gary! We've been calling companies to try and confirm this is a requirement (hubby is really disappointed) and they keep sending us to the DMV and DOT. Ugh so hard trying to get answers! But I think hubby needs some time to prepare for CDL school in the first place (largest vehicle he's ever drove is a 17-passanger sprinter) but he seems to think CDL school is a piece of cake.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

but he seems to think CDL school is a piece of cake.

Oh goodness. This caused me grief.

Amanda, please understand that I come from a good place, with nothing but the utmost concern for you, your husband, and the motoring public.

Your husband is the most dangerous driver out on the road. There is nothing more dangerous than a student driver who is underestimating the job, his equipment, and the possible consequences a mistake in a rig can make.

I was an instructor, and my student did underestimate the job. He thought he was above it and he can handle it - piece of cake he told me. This same guy almost took out an entire fuel island, switched lanes improperly and almost ran over a car. He was a liability - just like your husband.

There is nothing easy about this job, and especially trucking school. He ego will be damaged when he struggles to shift gears, or when he comes inches from hitting that pole.

I too underestimated school. I was a stubborn 21 year old kid. Believe it or not, but I injured three classmates. I took off from a hill wrong and caused the truck to bounce like an earthquake and my students had sore necks for days because of that.

Please, tell your husband it's not a cakewalk. None of it is!

You'll have to wait a year, and in this year I hope he screws his head on right. Take it from me, I was in his shoes and now I'm experienced and an instructor/trainer. Your husband is going to get someone hurt if he continues with this idea that it's a cakewalk.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Believe me Daniel, I hear you.

I think some of the blame goes to the schools, companies and recruiters who promise the world. Someone like my husband who is a recent immigrant and concerned about his English and ability to get hired has jumped on that. He was in a semi-professional job in his home country and I think he has a bit of feeling that blue-collar work is automatically easy.

I was happy to hear about the one-year requirement because it would give him time to do The High Road program and get prepared. But he just talked to someone from CR England and he said that FL would let him get his CDL here now and then transfer it to NY.

He wants to begin school on March 9th. To complicate things, I'm up for a job in NYC and if I got it, I'd be starting mid-March.

I just wish he trusted me and the very thorough independent research I've done on this as much as he trusts the recruiters. I was against OTR but I'm absolutely NOT against LTL. I just want him to succeed.

Sorry this turned into a vent.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Believe me Daniel, I hear you.

I think some of the blame goes to the schools, companies and recruiters who promise the world. Someone like my husband who is a recent immigrant and concerned about his English and ability to get hired has jumped on that. He was in a semi-professional job in his home country and I think he has a bit of feeling that blue-collar work is automatically easy.

I was happy to hear about the one-year requirement because it would give him time to do The High Road program and get prepared. But he just talked to someone from CR England and he said that FL would let him get his CDL here now and then transfer it to NY.

He wants to begin school on March 9th. To complicate things, I'm up for a job in NYC and if I got it, I'd be starting mid-March.

I just wish he trusted me and the very thorough independent research I've done on this as much as he trusts the recruiters. I was against OTR but I'm absolutely NOT against LTL. I just want him to succeed.

Sorry this turned into a vent.

You would have to PROVE RESIDENCY in FL, in order to get a CDL (or any license). Not that difficult to do really - a few utility bills or pieces of mail, and/or an affidavit from your landlord.

LTL off the bat - might be a little more difficult - especially with lack of previous driving history - and lack of verifiable WORK HISTORY. He may have to go OTR for a bit - before he can really start looking for local/LTL work (though nothing is impossible).

Most people say a year of US licensure, in order to develop that history and residency.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah, I think trucking will whip him out of his ego. Just let it do what it does best. Trucking has a way about her, when you think you have it figured out it will put you back into place. The moment a driver stops learning is when that driver is an accident waiting to happen. You won't change his stubborn ways.

Unfortunately, he's got to open his eyes about these recruiters. Their one and only job is to bring in students and many of them will stop at nothing to convince you to join the company. He's got to learn to sift what is BS and what is true. I'm not saying all recruiters are like this, but most of them stretch the truth and all of them make you think you'll become a millionaire if you sign on with them.

i think I read correctly that you two will move to NYC? Well, good luck because the cost of living is through the roof. I honestly don't think he will make enough at CR England to live comfortably financially in NYC. They have arguably the lowest pay in the industry.

Also, he's going to begin school on March 9th? Is he somehow bypassing the 1 year wait time or is he going to try to go to trucking school now then wait a year. If that's his plan then I highly encourage him to not attempt it. Whenever he does get it, he needs to get his license and then a job immediately. No wait time in between.

Your independent research is the best thing you can do right now (so long as you stick with this site only). Why isn't he the one posting here? Is he really going to do our High Road Training Program or is he just saying that? Make sure you're on top of him. Folks like him almost never make it to solo status, and if they do, they're never happy and always on the bottom of the performance chart for the fleet.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

He wanted to verify the one-year non commercial DL requirement by talking to someone so I found the number of a recruiter for CR England. From what I've read, CR England is pretty much bottom of the barrel for driver requirements, so I figured the recruiter would tell him "sorry, have to wait one year," he'd finally accept that he couldn't get it until December and it would buy us time to research and study.

Well, that backfired on me. The recruiter told him that FL has no such requirement. He said, "but my wife is up for a great job in NYC." And she advised him to get his CDL in FL and then transfer it to NY and then he could apparently get hired (I'm skeptical about that).

So he all of the sudden was all pumped to start school on March 9th. I tried to point out all of the logistical issues with that (pre-hires, his work history is all in a different country+a employment due to immigration, he hasn't done any studying and knows nothing about trucking, LTL is VERY competitive for rookies and he needs to have his act together to have a shot) and it was like talking to a brick wall.

After lots of arguing and some tears on my part, he agreed to start The High Road, read CDL training diaries and read 6 string's linehaul post (all 22 pages of it). He's working on The High Road materials right now. He just asked me what an upgrade was or something like that. He does say he likes this website.

Are there any truckers on here (esp LTL) who would be willing to call him and give him a first-hand perspective of the industry?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Noticed an error. He has an employment GAP due to immigration. He wasn't allowed to legally work in the US during the process. With the weight trucking puts on stable employment history, I could see the gap, plus the non-US work history, being a problem.

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