Literally 2 More Months ...... WOW!

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Chris's Comment
member avatar

Soooo! CRST gave me a call and she said my failure to yield right of way litarely needs to be 2 months older for them to hire me. Oh what shallll I do! Hm maybe see if the GI BILL will let me switch from fire science to truck driving, but then I run into the challenge of, who will hire me with a shaky employment history after I get it!?

HMMMMMMMMi>

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Chris, you can apply for pre-hires before you even commit to attending a school. If you can get two or three pre-hires you know you'll land a job in the industry after graduating from a Private Truck Driving Schools.

We have an excellent article on Understanding Pre-Hires for anyone unfamiliar with the process.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

DaveDiesel's Comment
member avatar

In addition to pre-hire letters, the time of year you submit your applications is also something to consider. I think companies are looking to do the bulk of their hiring in late spring in preparation for the busy summer, and they might be more willing to take a "chance" on you when the manpower demand is at a peak.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Chris's Comment
member avatar

CRST certainly sounds promising, I was thinking about this, getting my permit and finding one of the owner operators that said they would teach me everything I need to know about driving. A semi isn't much longer than my truck and trailer. I never knew my GCWR was overweight either so until I have a CDL-A I can't drive it.... I have a 2008 f-440 crew cab long bed my gooseneck horse trailer is 48 feet. The GVWR on the truck is 14,500 and the GVWR on the trailer is 15,700. WELLLLLL CRAP! I can back with ease and drive safely. My issue is going to be shifting in a rig because I only know automatic and pretrips, and i'm sure a few other surprises will be thrown at me when I start learning. My point is at least teaching me much much easier for one of these guys than most of the people who come through who can barely wield a cavalier... What are your thoughts on this? I don't think the GI BILL will let me switch this late in the game. What would the company do if one came to the company with a cdl-a with no experience. training with a mentor as if straight outta their school?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

GVWR:

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

GVWR is the maximum operating weight of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer, minus any trailers.

GCWR:

Gross Combined Weight Rating

The GCWR refers to the total weight of a vehicle, including all trailers.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

LunchBox's Comment
member avatar

What would the company do if one came to the company with a cdl-a with no experience. training with a mentor as if straight outta their school?

I'm not a trucker, yet, but if I'm not mistaken getting a CDL-A without schooling or going through company-sponsored training is almost worthless.

The 160(?) hour training certificate is worth >= the CDL-A.

From what I've seen you post, I'd say take the 2 months and figure out what kind of driving you want to do and make it happen.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Chris's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

What would the company do if one came to the company with a cdl-a with no experience. training with a mentor as if straight outta their school?

double-quotes-end.png

I'm not a trucker, yet, but if I'm not mistaken getting a CDL-A without schooling or going through company-sponsored training is almost worthless.

The 160(?) hour training certificate is worth >= the CDL-A.

From what I've seen you post, I'd say take the 2 months and figure out what kind of driving you want to do and make it happen.

I want to flatbed OTR. That is my end goal. I will do whatever it takes to get there though. I would like to get with a company that goesto the 48 and Canada. I love Canada.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

DaveDiesel's Comment
member avatar

Chris, You shouldn't have a problem adjusting your GI Bill paperwork to pay for CDL school. many CDL schools are GI Bill approved. Many companies will also allow you to draw GI Bill money during your first 1-2 years of driving in order to supplement your income. Where you will run into issues is if you are currently mid-way through a college semester using the GI Bill. If you withdraw, I don't think the GI Bill will pay the costs. Remember, you have 10 years to use it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
What are your thoughts on this?

Chris, that training certificate showing that you have had 160 hours training is very important in today's trucking business environment. I'm not going to say it is the only way you can get a job, but it sure takes a lot of the trouble and problems out of the way for a rookie trying to land their first job. If you end up trying to be a maverick and obtain your CDL by one of the many short-cuts that people foolishly try you will only hinder your efforts at reaching your goals.

I want to flatbed OTR. That is my end goal. I will do whatever it takes to get there though. I would like to get with a company that goes to the 48 and Canada. I love Canada.

Chris, have you looked into Western Express at all? I started out my career in their flat-bed fleet and during my first three months as a solo driver I had hit 46 of the lower 48 states. They ran me like I was a seasoned veteran - I'm still getting calls from them begging me to come back. They will keep you busy as long as you keep proving to them that you can handle all they give you. I never went to Canada with them, but they will certainly run you all over the lower 48.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Chris's Comment
member avatar

Chris, You shouldn't have a problem adjusting your GI Bill paperwork to pay for CDL school. many CDL schools are GI Bill approved. Many companies will also allow you to draw GI Bill money during your first 1-2 years of driving in order to supplement your income. Where you will run into issues is if you are currently mid-way through a college semester using the GI Bill. If you withdraw, I don't think the GI Bill will pay the costs. Remember, you have 10 years to use it.

I have used 3 semesters of it for fire science technology. That is my only concern with this. I'll give VA a call on this. Their next class starts this next monday lol

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Chris's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

What are your thoughts on this?

double-quotes-end.png

Chris, that training certificate showing that you have had 160 hours training is very important in today's trucking business environment. I'm not going to say it is the only way you can get a job, but it sure takes a lot of the trouble and problems out of the way for a rookie trying to land their first job. If you end up trying to be a maverick and obtain your CDL by one of the many short-cuts that people foolishly try you will only hinder your efforts at reaching your goals.

double-quotes-start.png

I want to flatbed OTR. That is my end goal. I will do whatever it takes to get there though. I would like to get with a company that goes to the 48 and Canada. I love Canada.

double-quotes-end.png

Chris, have you looked into Western Express at all? I started out my career in their flat-bed fleet and during my first three months as a solo driver I had hit 46 of the lower 48 states. They ran me like I was a seasoned veteran - I'm still getting calls from them begging me to come back. They will keep you busy as long as you keep proving to them that you can handle all they give you. I never went to Canada with them, but they will certainly run you all over the lower 48.

I will have to check them out! Thank you so much old school. I wanna run hard. Go as hard as legally possible. Amped up on onstant coffee and monster ;) lol

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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