Looking For Honest Answers.

Topic 8906 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Daniel Wyatt's Comment
member avatar

Hi,name is Daniel and I'm new to TT.I am not a trucker but I do dream of one day getting behind the wheel.the lifestyle of a trucker getting to be out on the road for weeks at a time and laying my head down and waking up in a different state has always fascinated me.but I do have a few questions for you experienced drivers out there and please be honest.realistically how much can and otr drive van driver make his first year going thru a company sponsored school after the school and uncle Sam gets what he want from your check.and my last 2 questions are after at least 3years experience with a good driving record what can a dry van vs a flat bed expect to bring home after uncle Sam gets ahold of your check and are there any company's that let you do both dry van and flat bed otr.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

First year is always the toughest. You're adapting to everything as a new driver and building a reputation for yourself with your company. With that in mind, if you work hard and keep your nose clean, $40,000 is achievable. With 3 solid years under your belt, again keeping your nose clean and applying yourself, I see no reason that you shouldn't be able to be in the 52-55 range.

I'm sure the veterans can chime in better than I can but that's my personal goal and you better believe I'll meet or beat it.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Daniel Wyatt's Comment
member avatar

40grand is a lot better than what I bring in now but could I still hit that going thru a company sponsored school?

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Absolutely. Just remember, your only limitation is you. The miles are there, you just have to show how much you want them.

Daniel Wyatt's Comment
member avatar

Sweet.sounds good to me.I know I'm not a trucker and I have zero experience behind the wheel of a big rig but someone once told me the only way you will succeed with a job is if you love what you do and ever since I can remember trucking has always been on my mind.the only thing holding me back tho is my dog.had him forever and I just can't imagine not seeing him everyday.

TopNotchTre's Comment
member avatar

Ive only been on the road a2 months and i am making about 3200 a month after taxes..

TopNotchTre's Comment
member avatar

Thats with going Out 11 days and home for 3.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Daniel!

There are quite a few companies out there that haul an assortment of freight. It's not uncommon for instance to find companies with flatbed, refrigerated, and tanker under one roof and it's normally not that difficult changing from one division to another within the company once you get a little experience there. In fact, getting on with a company like that is a great way to try hauling different types of freight and yet continue getting experience with the same company. That's a huge bonus right there.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

Hi,name is Daniel and I'm new to TT.I am not a trucker but I do dream of one day getting behind the wheel.the lifestyle of a trucker getting to be out on the road for weeks at a time and laying my head down and waking up in a different state has always fascinated me.but I do have a few questions for you experienced drivers out there and please be honest.realistically how much can and otr drive van driver make his first year going thru a company sponsored school after the school and uncle Sam gets what he want from your check.and my last 2 questions are after at least 3years experience with a good driving record what can a dry van vs a flat bed expect to bring home after uncle Sam gets ahold of your check and are there any company's that let you do both dry van and flat bed otr.

I will just add a couple of things to what has already been said.

I would get with a company that has variety of type of freight. I started with Prime in the reefer division and then after about 2 years, changed over to the flatbed division. Never regretted that decision. Try to minimize what you are having to learn at the start (will be enough just learning to do all the things you need to without adding to the steep learning curve). So go with something a little more simple and then change once you have the basics down (like I did with reefer, then changed to flatbed).

The money will come as you gain experience and confidence.

Ernie

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Bj H.'s Comment
member avatar

This is my story. Got my CDL almost 2 years ago with Coors. Was Bringin home $575 a week. Monday thru Friday. Rough job, a lot of labor, cheap labor. Got on with a Fracking company, 2 weeks on, 1 week off. Easiest money you will make. Bringin home between $2800-$3800 every 2 weeks. Crazy money. Got laid off on February. Now I'm drivin oil field equipment all over TX, NM, OK, and LA. Bringin home $1900 every 2 weeks. It's an on call position/salary so don't really know when I'll be workin or for how long. That's the crappy part. Other then that I'm racking up miles and getting a ton of experience on a lot of different types of equipment.

Point is, there are a lot of different ways to use your CDL. So many different types of trucks, jobs, schedules, pay and how they pay.

Personally, I'm 2 months away from a full 2 years of CDL experience and am gonna try to use my tanker and hazmat endorsements for better money/schedule etc.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More