Otr Question

Topic 9085 | Page 1

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's Comment
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If you deliver a load and the load shifted or tipped over on the wooden pallets does the place usually refuse the load?

The Persian Conversion's Comment
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It probably depends on the degree to which it has shifted and if there's any obvious damage. In my experience, most of these forklift operators just take the load off like zombies without really inspecting anything.

's Comment
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It probably depends on the degree to which it has shifted and if there's any obvious damage. In my experience, most of these forklift operators just take the load off like zombies without really inspecting anything.

How long does it take on average to get unloaded? How long you waiting on average? Thank you for your opinion.

The Persian Conversion's Comment
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So I drive flatbed so it may be different from reefer or dry van , but I'll give you my experience. On average, I'd say the wait is usually longer than the actual unloading time. It can vary a lot from place to place though. For example, I've waited about 3 hours hours in a long line of trucks all carrying lumber to a door/window factory, mainly because I didn't get there early enough (if they don't do appointments, I recommend trying to get there at least an hour before they open in the morning and waiting outside the gate). But to actually unload the lumber only took maybe 15-20 minutes. On the other hand, I delivered a hydraulic lift to a guy's farm in the muffle of nowhere, South Dakota. Obviously there was no wait for that one. So it all depends on where you're at and what you're hauling. But on average, I'd say I usually wait maybe up to an hour often sooner, sometimes much longer, and then about 15 minutes to unload. Then there could be another 15-20 minutes or so of putting equipment away (rolling tarps, straps, etc.)

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Errol V.'s Comment
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How long does it take on average to get unloaded? How long you waiting on average? Thank you for your opinion.

One forklift driver can pull out 15 pallets in 20 minutes. I had a load of tires that had been hand stacked herringbone style in a trailer I had picked up. The live unload took two hours.

Waiting to get to the dock can be a whole 'nother story. Anything from "back it in" on your Lucky Day, to 8 hours sitting in a holding area.

Chris the stick slinger's Comment
member avatar

You'll get them all.

Been a hour early, held me in staging for two hours, and then sat on the dock for three more before the actual loading started. An hour and a half later it was all over. Five and a half hours (even after you take off the early hour) WITH an appointment time.

Been in and out in an hour with an open time as well.

.02

Terry C.'s Comment
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There isn't much of an average. I've waited 22 hours after I checked in for a load at national beef in Dodge city. I've been in a loading dock for 14 hours getting loaded at Anhueser busch in NY.(They loaded pallets then stopped. Then took some back off and loaded some more after)

Delivering to Wal-Mart DC's you can only check in an hour before your appt but usually have you loaded and bills signed in under 4 hours.

If there's damage to freight, you'll be there longer and then sometimes be stuck with the damaged freight to get rid of/throw away.

But if there's an "average" wait time to load/unload from the time you check in until you get loaded/unloaded I'd say about 4 hours. But longer wait times are frequent.

Kenneth L.'s Comment
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How long does it take on average to get unloaded? How long you waiting on average? Thank you for your opinion.

On this particular load I'm on, I arrive at the consignee 16 hours early. Why? because I was hoping they would go ahead and unload me. This time they said they were too busy and to come back at appointment time. It only cost me an extra 10 minutes of driving time to get to a truck stop so no biggie. Another 10 minutes or so depending on traffic to get back and get unload tomorrow morning.

You might think this is going to cut into your paycheck. It only has a minimal effect though as long as your DM keeps giving you a lot of loads. I tend to run out of my 70 hour anyway, so It only allows some time to replenish that clock some. Which gets used up later as more loads tend to fall my way. Yesterday, I had picked up that load with only 24 minutes remaining in my 70. So as long as my 70 is keeping me down, no money is lost in the long run over long waits. Just as long as there aren't too many long waits too close together in a week.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Cody B.'s Comment
member avatar

Seems to always be different no matter what just depends on where you are and what kind of freight you are hauling I also pull a flatbed and my first few weeks I was in and out of places in no more than 2 mores a lot of times less than that, then today I picked up some coils and was there 6 hours and 4 of those hours was just waiting to back in to get loaded, from my very short month of experience I would say there is no average typical day everyday is usually different and since most of the time we deal with people live loading and unloading it just depends on them a lot too how they like to work and if they have pride in their work or if they just wanna sit around and punch a time card and could careless about anything just the name of the game but waiting at the shipper or a consignee isn't a big deal cause if you work for a good company they will keep your wheels turning day or night. That's just my .02

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
's Comment
member avatar

So I drive flatbed so it may be different from reefer or dry van , but I'll give you my experience. On average, I'd say the wait is usually longer than the actual unloading time. It can vary a lot from place to place though. For example, I've waited about 3 hours hours in a long line of trucks all carrying lumber to a door/window factory, mainly because I didn't get there early enough (if they don't do appointments, I recommend trying to get there at least an hour before they open in the morning and waiting outside the gate). But to actually unload the lumber only took maybe 15-20 minutes. On the other hand, I delivered a hydraulic lift to a guy's farm in the muffle of nowhere, South Dakota. Obviously there was no wait for that one. So it all depends on where you're at and what you're hauling. But on average, I'd say I usually wait maybe up to an hour often sooner, sometimes much longer, and then about 15 minutes to unload. Then there could be another 15-20 minutes or so of putting equipment away (rolling tarps, straps, etc.)

Thank you for your response, must be rough waiting more then an hour at these places.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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