DOT Drug Testing: Urinalysis Or Hair Follicle?

Topic 971 | Page 37

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Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Jason throws shade:

I'm not a big Swift fan

OK, Jason, can you explain? Just curious. And as of January 1, Swift uses hair testing.

There are several Swifties on this forum. (not to worry, we probably won't gang up on you!)

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bumping this...

Jason, a year ago you asked Errol what he thought of Swift because you were looking to jump ship from a company you had trained with. I think an explanation is in order about the comment you made.

Jason throws shade:

double-quotes-start.png

I'm not a big Swift fan

double-quotes-end.png

OK, Jason, can you explain? Just curious. And as of January 1, Swift uses hair testing.

There are several Swifties on this forum. (not to worry, we probably won't gang up on you!)

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Hey, Bert!

I'm not a big Swift fan, but they don't do hair testing, and they're headquartered in Phoenix. It might work out for you. Best wishes!

Swift DOES do hair follicle, now, as well as UA.

Silk G.'s Comment
member avatar

@ Brett My recruiter at Schneider National told me that they do hair test and not sure how far back they look and I'm not sure about the urine but I'll let you guys know on Monday

Silk G.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok guys today was day one of my training with shnider but it turns out to be watkins Shepard and when we went to the drug screening they collect hair samples and urine samples and sometimes even blood samples if your urine is elevated or abnormal

Lyynk's Comment
member avatar

WEL companies is UA only. Worked there for over a year and never heard of anyone getting a hair sample done. Also, First Fleet is UA as well. At least the one down here in Orlando FL is. Couldn't confirm on the other locations since they mostly act independently. Hope this helps.

Jason B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hypothetically, would a person with shoulder length hair who has not consumed cannabis for the past year need to cut their hair?

Jason F.'s Comment
member avatar

If I was a person with shoulder length hair who had not consumed cannabis for the past year, I'd shave my head, break out a bottle of Nair, and hop in the shower. My attitude is, when your employment is at stake, don't take any chances.

Hypothetically, would a person with shoulder length hair who has not consumed cannabis for the past year need to cut their hair?

Jason F.'s Comment
member avatar

My apologies to you and Errol, G-Town. I got another job and it's been quite a while since I visited the forum.

I actually did train with Swift. During the academy it was a bit of a cattle call. They had one instructor watching 20 or so drivers practicing their backing. A few months after I graduated, an instructor was killed during a backing accident in Texas.

My mentor was an O/O who had a dedicated run from Columbus, Ohio to the Chicago area. His loads were never more than 30,000 pounds, so I received no experience scaling loads or sliding the tandems. That run also had few hills, let alone mountains, so I didn't gain any experience in that area, either. My first solo trip, I got a heavy load from Vermont to Seattle, WA. FUN!

The training experiences aside, after I had been on the road about six months or so, I was dispatched on a load and the notes said, "IGNORE NO TRUCK SIGN." That seemed odd to me, so I took a photo of the message 'just in case.' Naturally, I got pulled over and was cited. Not long thereafter, I was called into my home terminal and they took me into an office, closed the door, and informed me they were going to have to let me go because of the incident. I asked why they decided to fire me over something they had told me to do, and produced the photo. Paperwork was signed, and I went out and began cleaning out my truck. About 15 minutes later, they called me back in and told me the terminal manager had decided to retain me. Swift actually paid for the ticket, but there were a lot of hoops to jump through, and I had to appear in court in Michigan, paid for my transportation, and lost income because of the time off the road.

After that, my miles were greatly reduced, and it seemed like they were looking for an excuse to fire me. I could go into a lot more detail about my Swift experiences, but I think this is enough for you to get the idea why I might not be a big fan of the company.

Bumping this...

Jason, a year ago you asked Errol what he thought of Swift because you were looking to jump ship from a company you had trained with. I think an explanation is in order about the comment you made.

double-quotes-start.png

Jason throws shade:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I'm not a big Swift fan

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

OK, Jason, can you explain? Just curious. And as of January 1, Swift uses hair testing.

There are several Swifties on this forum. (not to worry, we probably won't gang up on you!)

double-quotes-end.png

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Matthew R.'s Comment
member avatar

Does anyone know of a good company near Chico, CA. I'm looking for a company that can pay for my cdl training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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